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It is 9 degrees and front room space heater has quit. Thinking of taking kitchen space heater to front room and turning new elec oven on to protect plumbing. BRRR

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    Welcome to Sustainable Living. It's not clear what your question is; the title doesn't quite seem to match with the body of the question. – Flyto Mar 8 '15 at 22:39
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    @SimonW I think the OP is asking if he/she can use the electric oven temporarily to heat up the front room and/or kitchen so the water pipes don't freeze. – THelper Mar 10 '15 at 21:33
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Taking this as a question about how to stay warm without having the resource cost of replacing the space heater.

An electric oven is simply an electrical resistance heater in an insulated box. Sometimes with a fan. So probably not that different to your space heater. Running costs should be very similar.

You'll need to have the oven door open. And you'll need to keep an eye on it, and probably have the oven temperature turned down to its minimum - after all, a space heater would normally stop heating when its thermostat reaches 22°C or so, whereas an electric oven stops heating when its thermostat reaches, say. 200°C.

The other thing is that you can move a space heater around with you, to only heat the place you really need heating. Whereas ovens tend to be a lot less mobile.

So it's not really a long-term viable solution. More of a stop-gap for a few hours.

The good news is that most components in your space heater are probably recyclable. It may need to be treated as electronic waste, if it has a circuit-board controller. And it may be possible to get it repaired rather than replaced, meaning much less material waste.

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    With the door open, the oven will likely never reach the thermostat's shutoff temperature, so he should definitely keep checking the room to turn the oven off when the temperature reaches his target level. Also, it should go without saying that this is only safe with an electric oven, this should never be attempted with a gas oven, because it may emit dangerous levels of carbon monoxide. – Johnny Mar 7 '15 at 0:42

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