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15

It's part of nature that the corpses of dead animals are recycled by other organisms. But a corpse degraded by bacteria releases many dangerous toxins, for example botulinum toxin, which can contaminate the water and be dangerous for people and other animals. Please note what happens to the corpse of the animal in the natural environment. Firstly, most of ...


12

Since the food source that is attracting the rats is the food store next to you, you should talk with the owners of the store about taking one or more of the following measures: Make sure the rats cannot access any food or leftovers. This may be hard to do as rats can eat their way through various materials. Storing all food and garbage in metal containers ...


8

Outdoors Snakes and owls are the rat's natural predators out doors. If you can encourage their population in or near your yard you will decrease the rat population. Any bird of prey will hunt rats but Owls especially because they are nocturnal so they are most active when the rat is. Rodents are not fond of the smell of mint or citronella. Planting these ...


8

Depending on the size of the animal, you can try hot composting it. This should keep any toxins out of the water supply, while also giving you a good fertilizer. The basic steps are start with lots of wood chips. You want a base layer of at least 18 inches. (Again it depends on the size of the animal, larger animals need a larger base.) Add the animal ...


7

Silvopasture refers to practicing forestry and animal husbandry (grazing) in the same area. It isn't clear from your question if you're trying to raise animals in an existing forest or if you're trying to reforest a grazing area. I don't know of how you'd do this in a "wild nature" context, but practices that I've heard of would include harvesting the wood, ...


6

Methods There are several methods of livestock disposal to choose from, each has its own benefits and drawbacks. While there may be no correct answer for everyone, there are better approaches - especially as we factor in sustainability. Inspiration for this Q&A layout is drawn primarily from Amundson (2013). While this book concerns husbandry (see ...


6

My wife and I have about 100 free-ranging chickens. For bug control, they are a mixed blessing. Chickens eat just about any kind of insect they can find, excepting small ants, and thank goodness they don't appear to eat bees. But they also eat frogs and lizards, which also eat insects. We try to create environments where the frogs and lizards can hide ...


6

You seem to be well aware of the "cooking applications" of lard, but just in case you haven't heard of it, I'm particularly fond of Schmalz a German spread made from lard, together with small amounts of pork scratchings/cracklings, apples and onions. (For example, see here for a basic recipe.) As for candles, you can make about 12 candles from 2 pounds of (...


5

You can use it to replace oil when cooking things that would benefit from the pork flavour like soups. You can use it in any situation that requires deep frying. Chips taste especially nice when cooked in lard. It can be used as a wood preservative. It makes amazing pastries. If done properly and doesn't smell, you can add fabric dye and use it as shoe ...


5

Great Pyrenees (Pyrenean Mountain Dog) If you're in an area with a high-threat of animal attack (bear, wolf, coyote), consider 1-2 dogs specifically bred for the purpose of protecting livestock. This breed, specifically, has deeply-bred territorial instincts - which make it a desirable watchdog. They are capable of long-term, independent action and are ...


5

I would use a donkey. The dairy and sheep farmers I visited in the UK as a child used them, and there's a field of cows near me that has a pair of donkeys in it. When I go by on my bike, the donkeys clearly and obviously arrange themselves protectively between me and the cows. (We have coyotes and wolves near us - you can hear them howl at night and a ...


5

To be honest, I think this part is somewhat self-defeating: But how to best utilize a forest for animal husbandry, in the way that hopefully interferes with wild nature as little as possible? From a permaculture perspective the goal isn't to avoid interfering with nature, but to try to ensure that interference is constructive. In other words, ...


5

Unless there is lack of upland habitat, for example if you live in a highly developed area, then the conversion of any wetland area to upland area would almost certainly have a net negative impact on the system as a whole. Freshwater wetlands are comparatively rare and have been disappearing rapidly. Populations of the plants and animals that depend on ...


4

It sounds like you're mainly using hay as animal bedding, and possibly for a bit of food for the rabbits? With respect to mulch in the summer, it would make sense to put the used bedding to service as mulch -- it will carry along a bit of extra nutrient enrichment. (Of course, being careful not to use it around crops that would come into contact with manures ...


4

Your question seems to be specifically limited to grain fed to livestock, even though a great deal of the feed grown for livestock is not grain, and most livestock are not fed, let alone fed grain. It's likely based on stories like this one saying "U.S. could feed 800 million people with grain that livestock eat, Cornell ecologist advises animal scientists". ...


4

We kept 70 - 80 wild guinea pigs in the back of our lot for perhaps four months. They free-ranged the pasture during the daytime and slept in sturdy cages at night. Every few weeks we would move the cages, till the manure into the ground, and plant a garden. Here are some insights: 1) The guinea pigs did a fantastic job of eating down about half an acre ...


4

Possums are not farmed in New Zealand or in Australia. They're an Australian native, where most species are protected. The brushtail possum that's a major pest species in New Zealand is only minimally protected in Australia as it's very common. To the best of my knowledge there is no possum real industry in Australia, just some experimental outlets. So ...


4

I have an incomplete answer, but at least this is something to get the conversation started. At the bottom of your comments, you restate the question as "is organic any better because it costs more, meaning consumers buy less?" Throughout this sustainability Q&A forum, there is a misunderstanding that sustainability equates to the minimization of ...


4

No. Hemp apparently was, for medieval Europeans, a generic term used to describe any fibre. Thus there is a bewildering variety of plants carrying the name hemp, including; Manila hemp (abacá, Musa textilis), Sisal hemp (Agave sisalana), New Zealand hemp/flax (Phormium tenax), Brown/Madras/Sunn hemp (Crotalaria juncea), Indian hemp (jute, ...


3

More uses... Lard or the fat can be made into Lardo - or cured pork fat (Italian name). This is done without rendering it. It's remarkably tasty. There are many versions of this around the world. Lard can be 'cleaned' to remove much of the pork flavor too, and then is usually for nearly everything. You can look this up, but is mostly a process of ...


3

I have been told that pine is a natural de-wormer for goats. I always give mine a few descent size branches when they show signs of worms. They usually will try their hardest to get to the branches even when they have plenty to forage on. Never had any issues and the worm problem is usually eliminated.


3

If you can get a sticky rat mat, then place it in areas where they are sure to come. You can get scented mats, for e.g peanut butter etc. From your name, it appears you are from India. I was able to get those from local stores in Bangalore. One for your reference http://www.gluetraps.co.uk/rat-glue-trap-boards-2-c.asp


3

My father's goats love pine, not just the needles but the young and flexible twigs too. So much so that most of the pinetrees in the feeding area lost the branches under 1,5 meters or so. They never had a miscarriage, but had a lot of false pregnancies. I do not know if those have anything to do with pine.


3

Since asking the question I have been thinking about this quite a bit, and I believe the fundamental difference boils down to the balance between preventing and repairing negative externalities: cost[s] that [are] suffered by a third party as a result of an economic transaction. In a transaction, the producer and consumer are the first and second ...


3

A good question, but one for which the answer will differ for different locations around the world. Here in New Zealand, for example, very little feed is brought in from outside of the farm upon which the animals are being raised (for cattle and sheep). Livestock are grass fed and the norm is for each farm to produce enough hay/silage to get them through ...


2

If you install a basic filter (gravel, mesh, coarse sand, mesh) before the reservoir, close the system to reduce insect access, and make the barrels completely opaque that water should be safe for your livestock, well...forever. If there is no sunlight, and little to no organic matter in the water, it will be safe for you to drink! At least those measures ...


2

As with anything, what you really want to do is a basic risk assessment first. What are you worried about? What can you do about it? Initial thoughts of things to worry about: Fecal-oral pathogens (salmonella, fecal choliforms, etc). Birds may poop where the rain falls and that poses some concerns. Obviously the birds aren't dropping like flies but it ...


2

TLDR - Get a straight edged bucket, put one handful of chicken/rabbit/duck pellets and half fill with water. Put in easy to access area. The greedy buggers will jump and won't be able to climb out. I accidentally discovered this because we had a rat population explosion in our yard due to heavy rain and an abundance of food a few months ago. I am in the ...


2

If you're next to a feed lot of some sort, it's next to impossible to get rid of the rats completely. I live in a rat infested neighborhood and have done the following. Call the county and asked them to put out poison. There are two bait stations placed and maintained by the county in the creek that goes through my yard. Pick them off one by one. Rat ...


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