7

You need neither a tumble dryer nor a drying cabinet. I haven't used either for years, and we are a two person household in a 36m² studio apartment in England (so winters are rather humid). By far the most sustainable way to dry clothes is by drying on a line or a clothes horse. Tumble dryers use a lot of energy and damage your clothes. Drying cabinets ...


5

The generic and vague wording of the question seems deliberate, but unfortunately a meaningful answer can't be so simple. The primary factor that determines how long it will take a dryer to dry a load of clothes is not actually temperature, it's airflow. All the heat in the world won't help you if your dryer is overloaded, the lint tray is full/blocked, and ...


4

The discrepancy you find is about 30 %, and is probably in the range that you have to expect. The Report on a fair energy label for consumers "CLOSING THE ‘REALITY GAP’ – ENSURING A FAIR ENERGY LABEL FOR CONSUMERS" by CLASP, ECOS, EEB and Topten, 2017 says: Fridge energy consumption is tested and reported according to a norm (EN 62552:2013) that basically ...


3

Having shut off many fridges and freezers for storage, I can tell you exactly what happens and why. It will quickly become contaminated with mold The interior of a freezer has some plastic "skin" to present a surface that is more aesthetic and easier-to-clean than galvanized steel. However, the freezer does not stop at the skin; behind the skin is ...


2

I faced the same question with our new home recently. Ultimately I went with a conventional electric dryer. Whilst the trend in the last couple of decades has been to ridicule/dismiss conventional electric dryers because they are "inefficient", I believe that mentality is simplistic and outdated. The argument only really holds true if your dryer is solely ...


2

I'd say that you need to analyse the use you get from each appliance, and how inefficient the current ones are - for example, if you only use the dryer occasionally when it's too damp to dry clothing on a line, that's probably a lower priority. I'd probably go for the following order: Refrigerator - This tends to be on all of the time, so it's always using ...


1

I tested this with two identical loads of laundry, mostly socks (so, plenty of retained moisture after the spin cycle). I then checked my smart meter's records of how much power was used during that period, and subtracted the "baseline" usage. Tumble dry high: estimated 2.0 kWh, elapsed time 48 minutes Tumble dry low: estimated 1.4 kWh, elapsed ...


1

Some resources that I know of: Current recommendations from the EPA are to look for products that are EPEAT registered. iFixit produces repairability scores for smartphones, laptops, and tablets. In 2018, The Green Electronics Council released their State of Sustainable IT procurement report. In 2017, Greenpeace produced a Guide to Greener Electronics ...


1

Word of caution: If it's truly an antique and is in working order, upcycling the fridge may not be in your best interests. Depending on how you upcycle it, you may have to make irreversible changes to the fridge which could lower it's potential value. Definitely double-check with someone specialising in antique appliances first. With that out of the way, ...


1

It will depend on the age of the appliances. The refrigerator had a significant effect on my power bill. Next up is my water heater. They calcify at the bottom, limiting their efficiency over time (like your kettle). A measure of this is if you can actually get 40 gallons of hot water out of your tank - i.e. how many hot showers. Plus tanked water heaters ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible