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There are many different types of systems. The flood and drain system described by Earthling is one, very popular, style of system. It success is due to the fact that the grow bed where the plants are living is slowly filled, and then quickly drained. This quick draining pulls oxygen into the bed. This effectively is providing three things to the plant ...


10

The thing that matters most here are biomass producing ammonia, and surface area for bacteria in the grow beds to live on -- there must not be too much ammonia produced for the bacteria to handle, otherwise the fish will be stressed and later harmed. A good rule of thumb I've seen (links escape me right now) is 0.03Kg of fish per litre of growbed volume, or ...


9

Some experience with this. You won't get a yes/no answer. In general many omnivorous fish (carp, catfish) will eat lots of things but they may not be able to chew or bite with much force. This limits what they can eat. Additionally some can be somewhat picky eaters. Here are some suggestions I have found helpful: Unless it is really easy to chew (think ...


6

Definitely doable. As a 'proof of concept' water lilies can be grown in floating pots and survive many years. We found the limiting factor was preventing ducks eating them - a losing battle :-). Air lift or bubble pump: You can make a water lift pump using a "bubble pump". Some of your air bubbles are lead into the bottom of an open tube whose top ...


5

Added at top May 2016: @Johann commented on May 20th : Please note that the Question is talking about an Aquaponics system, not Hydroponics. The entire water system needs to completely recirculate at least once an hour due to fish/oxygen needs. Your pump will be a very large one or a multi staged set up. This suggests that while my advice may be ...


5

The design may vary, but I am familiar with the following system: The vegetable beds are filled with clay pellets (which do not retain much water) and the vegetables are planted inside the pellets. A pump continuously pumps water from the fish tank into the vegetable beds. Only when the beds are almost full with water do the roots touch the water surface. A ...


4

I love lotus root and am a bit prejudiced against styrofoam, so I would probably try to grow lotus plants. They supposedly clean the water as well, so I am sure they'd be a good addition to your system. I don't much about it, but in Japan the lotus is harvested in winter (December–January), when the fields look like all harvest has long rotted away: (...


4

The different organic waste should be tested, one by one, feeding them to the fish in small quantities and processing it before to have it edible by the fsh (maybe dedicate an old blender to pre-chew it). Other direction would be to compost it and use them in an other beneficial way. The solution of the compost tower in the middle of grow beds is a good ...


4

This is a fun question. I am not against plastics in my designs but lets see what we can do to get around this! Wood? I would think that a good hard wood with closely packed grain would be a great building block for grow beds and even the fish tank. If you employed basic boat building skills and adhesives such as a resin you might be "sustainable". You ...


3

I think deep water systems, if I understand them correctly, would be problematic because hops plants become quite large (larger, perhaps, than cucumber plants!). Now it might be possible with proper training and support, since these are vines, but that's where your limitations are likely to be.


3

Either method will work. Your primary consideration is simply keeping air out of the siphon while it is operational. If you can heat and bend this has the advantage of avoiding joints which might eventually be weak points, but the joint and glue approach has the advantage of being more flexible to repurpose. If it were me, I would choose the join and glue ...


3

You can try lots of things but Swiss chard, lettuce, pickles / cucumbers, tomatoes, strawberries and chilis should all be relatively easy. Leafy vegetables should generally be easy but do experiment as in part the question of what crops work with your system will depend on the specifics of what you build and how it is positioned...


3

I don't know much about aquaponics, aeroponics or fogponics, but I from what I've read on wikipedia I think those require more maintenance and resources than a simple vegetation-covered roof. Therefore I will focus my answer on the latter. The most low-maintenance, low-resources solution probably is to build a green roof covered with sedum plants. Sedum can ...


3

(This is only meant as an extended comment. I hope someone with aquaponics experience will be able to answer your question. I have only seen much bigger aquaponics set-ups, outside.) I unfortunately don't have any experience with aquaponics, but it looks like your system is inside. My experience with tomatoes is that they need lots of warmth and light. My ...


3

This looks like the yellow spotted millipede, which exudes cyanide as a self defense. Some people will smell the cyanide, which smells like almonds when handling these millipedes, though not everyone is able detect it. I don't know what the exposure would be to a fish eating one of these, but studies have been conducted on the effects on tilapia of ...


2

Any type of micro-green is generally very easy to grow, but I have seen people grow tomatoes, squash, peppers, etc. As long as you have the room and the light required otherwise, you shouldn't have a problem growing food in an aquaponic system that you wouldn't otherwise have.


2

You can put a compost pipe in the middle of your grow beds. A 6" pipe for example perforated at the end that is submerged in the grow bed. Worms will go into the pipe during flood cycles and break down the organic waste. Then during drain cycles they will go into the substrate of the grow bed and continue spreading their goodness. The power of worms in AP is ...


2

So far the best over all design I have seen is provided by Affnan, Rob Torcellini, and TCLynx. Affnan has expanded on Murray Hallam's original design using a venturi on the internal stand pipe to create better suction. Rob introduced a j tube set up under the tank connected to the stand pipe to create additional back pressure - which once broken also ...


2

Tomatoes sound like a good start, easy to grow and they like the structure you could provide.


2

You didn't mention if you had done any Ph readings, so it seems like a good to consider the ph balancing process that aquaponic systems are known for, there is a ph plummet issue which can happen as a new system balances. It seems that my fish are living in 8.0 water after the winter ice melted, so I"m trying to keep it down toward 6.5


2

I don't know if I would mix the tea with the aquaculture, maybe feed the fish worms instead? I think that by adding the nitrogen from the tea, you would just be adding more nitrogen to a system with it's own nitrogen input (fish poo), possibly more than the plants could take up, which could lead to algal blooms, and de-oxygenation, which might kill your ...


1

To determine if lighting levels are responsible, I suggest you put similar plants (tomatoes, cucumbers and green beans) into self-contained pots (using potting mix) and sit them within the same lighting as what the aquaponics system gets, and see how well they grow. You will of course need to water them manually as appropriate. It may also be worth double ...


1

No experience at wicking beds, but a couple alternatives: Can you circulate the water through an evaporative cooler? This could be as simple, as a place in the shade with a small pond and a pump that converted some of the pond to mist. The aquaponics solution remains separate, and is circulate by a separate pump. Is the diurnal temperature swing large ...


1

Why not simply get a food waste composter with earthworms? This allows worms for fish food, a place to make use of food waste, it gives valuable organic liquid and solid fertilizers that can be used for wheat grass or other edible plants. The water from the fish tanks are used to water the plants, and the plant system is used to filter and clean the fish ...


1

I had the same system with the same result as yours; my lettuce seeds germinated but later all the plants wilted. My suggestion, and what I have done in my system, is just let the grow-bed "mature" -- let the water cycle for a week. The reason might be that the water may not have enough nutrients for it to grow and support plants. Try cycling, continually ...


1

If your system does not flood and drain somehow, it is to be expected that the plants will dry out. Without the flood and drain, the plants will have a hard time getting their roots all the way to the water. You can accomplish a flood and drain via two methods: Use a timer on the pump and use a standard 2-outlet setup like in a hydro tray. One short ...


1

I have been wanting to make a aquaponic system as well. The biggest problem, for me, is that I live in Denmark and I am sure that I can't get enough sunlight all year to keep the ecosystem running. I would think the same problem, not enough light, might be present in an apartment.


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