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9

For certain materials, you can use them to make bug hotels with the material. Fine materials (hair grass, small twigs, seed fluff) can be left as nest making materials. Fine materials can also be used as firestarter. Some material, such as prunings, can be used in various crafts: for winter decoration, basket weaving, etc. If you are in the right city, ...


6

Water has a heat capacity of 4.1814 J/g which means that 1 gram of water requires 4.1814 Joules of heat to increase 1°C. The definition of Watt is Joules / second so the formula you need is: heat capacity * mass * temp. increase / time in seconds I'm assuming the water was at 30 degrees before you started heating it, just like the room. Since water boils ...


5

Chimneys almost never clog from soot/creosote buildup, so your assumption is flawed, but thick buildup is dangerous because of the potential chimney fire. A well-designed, well-managed rocket mass heater will produce a tiny fraction of the buildup of a conventional woodstove. So the concern is minimized. You can build a cleanout at each corner to let you ...


4

I have been pursuing this problem for many years and I have come up with a viable solution that I have developed from my 10 years of research and commercial application. I have developed a system called SSTCS-"Synergistic Sustainable Tumble Culture System" that can take eutophic water from point source pollution from effluent or no point pollution that ...


4

Want to agree with Sherwood Botsford's answer in that you should try to recycle the nutrients in weeds back into your soil via composting as the first priority. You might see that many weeds have quite long taproots, which draw up nutrients from much deeper soil than other plants can reach. So this would be a way to get more nutrients to your wanted crops. ...


3

The article you mention in the comments under the other answer describes several ways in which (at least some forms of) biomass for energy are problematic from a carbon point of view. In summary: Clear cutting of existing forest releases carbon now, which then takes decades or centuries to be recaptured by replacement trees. Using every scrap of wood/energy ...


3

Depending on the size (esp height) of your growing spacec. One of the following would work: willow (Salix spp), elephant grass (Miscanthus fuscu), or as @JChomel mentions, bamboo. Willow is especially useful as it can grow in ground that is saturated for much of the time. Occasional flooding with the human waste would be less of an issue. It makes an ...


3

Growing plants inside to consume CO2 will need a huge energy input. If your plants are indoors behind a huge window with long sun exposure, then it is ok. If you intend to provide artificial light to them, then it won't be environmentally sustainable at all: your light input will need so much energy and reject so much CO2... Anyway, this set aside, a good ...


2

I guess the sustainability depends strongly on how the pellets are produced. Often pellets are made from by-product from other forest industry which makes it trickier to calculate emission and carbon footprint. I took a quick look at IEA (International Energy Agency) and they had a general article about bio-energy: http://www.iea.org/techinitiatives/...


1

On behalf of the global MSDS (Mustard Seed Day Society) initiative, I present our answer. Before we can understand how biomass can be a viable alternative, we must first become intimate with the original meaning of the word, which describes all that is (or was) alive. The answer to your question can be found in a clump of turf. To help on that journey of ...


1

The carbon that gets released by burning them was first stored in the plants, so the CO2 was taken out of the atmosphere temporarily. The idea is that if you do this continously, you create a carbon sink whose size corresponds to the total amount of plant material that is currently growing.


1

In e.g. China, L-cysteine is produced from human hair (among other things) and used as a dough conditioner (bread 'improver') https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rKoi3P84OQU Or Google for l-cystine bread improver human hair


1

I have found it good to deter rabbits from eating shrubbery/gardens, sprinkled on the ground. You don't need much as it lasts a long time.


1

I place my weeds right down where I pulled them up. All stages of the plants decomposition are beneficial, not just having them ready composted and dug into the soil. The first stage of having the wilted plant there is useful because slugs often prefer to eat it instead of live plants. The next stage of having brown straw like matter on top of the soil is a ...


1

There isn't one general sustainability metric that can easily be calculated or derived to compare the various options, so this question is rather difficult to answer. The choice of feedstock for producing any type of product from biomass has an influence on: GHG emissions (the method and amount of energy required for harvesting and processing) use of ...


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