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Available data indicates that; 1) electricity usage for water pumping at homes is minimal; and 2) most municipal water systems provide more pressure than required for residential uses Is it common for people on city water in the US to have their own on-site pumping as part of the "standard" delivery system? The U.S. Energy Information Agency's 2015 ...


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This question needs to consider waste management for two phases: construction/renovation and occupation. During the construction phase the design should consider the materials used and how they are provided. For example, if rafters are needed, it might be cheaper to only use one length of lumber and then cut it up as required during construction of the ...


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These are just simple means: Place water dispensers that replace the usage of canned and bottled beverages place recycling bins near the front entrance, nudging occupants into using them provide space for composting organic waste This list is probably not complete, feel free to add


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I've used them. I've never been happy with them. If you do use them you need to follow these rules: If you wrap them you must have the wraps evenly spaced. You can't have 3 turns per foot at one end of the pipe and 6 turns per foot at the other end. The temperature sensor (disk on the orange blob) must be pressed tightly against the pipe. The full ...


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Place built-in bins for different waste streams A lot of office kitchens/lunch rooms I've seen have only had one available bin (i.e only landfill). The designs of these kitchens did not account for having multiple waste streams - thus there was only one cupboard/cabinet or freestanding bin. Some buildings awkwardly 'solved' this by having another free-...


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