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That the scheme actually has a net positive effect, both in the short and long-term How effective a tree planting scheme is in capturing and storing carbon dioxide, is for a large part determined by what happens to the trees after they are planted. When trees mature and are harvested for wood that's used in construction, then the captured carbon dioxide is ...


31

There are different levels of service. In itself planting a tree is very easy and cheap, of the 3 billion trees in the UK, most drop thousands of seeds each year and some germinate all by themselves for free. On the other hand, planting seedlings can be done mechanically using a Damcon PL10 with four row attachment, you can plant 20,000 in a day, costing ...


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Questions about tree planting have come up on StackExchange quite often, and in the news various countries have great drives to plant vast numbers of trees in a single day. A common issue seems to be a misunderstanding of the relationship between planting 'a tree' and 'offsetting carbon'. Whilst its true that a single mature twenty year old tree will both ...


7

Any time you want to give money to a charity, you should do some basic research on how the charity spends donated money. Some charities spend over 90% of donated funds on charitable works, with minimal overhead, others spend a lot of money on salaries and perks for executives, and some spend a lot of money on lobbying politicians or educating the public to ...


6

There isn't an easy answer on offsetting time: in theory, the sooner the better, because every year that passes with higher greenhouse gas levels. increases the heat content of the Earth. If you wanted it just to come out net zero addition of greenhouse gases to the atmosphere, over the PV's whole lifetime, then reckon on 20 years if it's monocrystalline. ...


5

There is a saying in the sustainability world; "Reduce what you can, offset what you can't". If you burn fossil fuels, you are adding CO2 to the atmosphere. While it is possible to reduce atmospheric CO2 levels with an off-setting scheme, for example by planting new trees that take up CO2, burning fossil fuels still raises the amount of carbon that is ...


3

One concern is that it takes too long. Because a sustainable forest needs decades to grow it is a midterm solution only. Another concern that comes to mind which I have not yet heard is that the forests compete with farming over land use: Both need reasonably fertile land. This conflict resembles the one created by plants grown for fuel: Rich countries ...


3

The simple answer is that the "completed" project is ongoing. Much as a motorway doesn't stop emitting once it's completed, a landfill gas capture system does not stop reducing emissions once construction is complete, and a forest doesn't stop absorbing carbon once it's planted. But the exact answer is generally in the fine print. Often those ...


1

Carbon offsets for completed projects seem like a major con but then again carbon offsets are a major con anyway. If you buy something that has been already completed, remember to ensure you will be the new owner of the thing that was completed. Examples: A car maker completes building an electric car. You can buy it. A heat pump company completes ...


1

Your best bet to offset is not via some carbon-offset program that are a big con, but rather by directing your money into green investments. Invest in wind power, solar power, geothermal heat pump etc stocks. And when you have enough money invested in these stocks that you could purchase a geothermal heat pump system, you can decide whether the biggest ...


1

I don't think "people " buy them . Corporations or companies buy them as required by law ( in USA). One instance is auto manufacturers : When the new automobile fleet average does not meet the EPA requirements . GM may purchase credits from Tesla ( Tesla has a bunch of credits because carbon used to generate electricity is not counted ) . This is done ...


1

Yes. Account for as many externalities as possible. Ticket price Flight £100 Train £170 Environmental Impact Cost Calculate the offset costs for both options, so that they would both be equally Carbon Neutral. The flight, as you've calculated is £100 + £10 = £110 The train is about 40Kg CO2 so £170 + £1 = £171 Perhaps we can assume that CO2 footprint ...


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