12

I'm not sure of the legality, but here is an article on raising chickens in NYC: Urban Agriculture: Raising Chickens in New York City I looked at the NYC Ordinances and it looks like it may be possible to get a permit to keep chickens, but then it also looked like permits will no longer be issued. Check out NYC Title 24: http://72-0-151-116.tvc-ip.com/nyc/...


11

My grandmother was feeding chickens with cooked potatoes mixed with bran. They will also eat practically all other kinds of food. They love corn and noodles, even raw. But they were supplying their diet on the backyard, looking for worms, so in winter you'll have to supply them with some animal food. It can be almost everything, from worms to small fish. ...


10

It IS legal to have chickens in NYC and there is even an organization that helps people get set up and understand what they are getting into called the City Chicken Project. http://www.justfood.org/city-farms/city-chicken-project This interview with Elizabeth Bee Ayer, who runs City Chicken Institute in Metro NY also stated that it is legal to have ...


9

You're confusing concepts. Chickens are used to prepare the ground prior to the planting of the food forest. They weed the ground, fertilize and lay eggs. They are confined inside moveable fencing, and any domestic breed will do the job. In no universe do they mow lawns. See http://www.treehugger.com/sustainable-agriculture/using-chickens-plant-food-forest....


8

Chickens have a wide diet and will eat a lot of different things. They need a good mix of carbs, fats, and proteins with a variety of nutrients -- just like we do. For eating "fresh" (i.e. food that won't be stored): They can be pastured in an orchard to clean up fallen fruit and remove bugs. Any fruit tree seems like it would be fair game here. They will ...


7

FORGET chickens, bucko. They might eat seeds and seedlings but in no universe I know they actually cut grass down. My goodness. If you are wanting A LAWN forget about hiring goats, horses, cattle...sheeps. That is fine for pasture but you'd have to be able to rotate them before they eat down to the crowns and demolish any grass plants you have. If you ...


6

Chickens are not lawn mowers. They eat grass, but they select what they like (plants with relatively large leaves are preferred, like clovers, Plantago, etc). So you have no uniform cutting. They like also much the ground, so they will start to throw away grass in patches, so that they can delouse (if it is dry) or looking for worms (if is is more humid). ...


4

At least within permaculture chickens are employed to get rid of any weeds and other types of hardy plants. I dare say that "all cover crops" really means all cover crops. Don't let chickens near your cover crops. If you still want to use chickens in your forest make a movable chicken coop (a chicken tractor) of a decent (big) size and see what they do to ...


3

Quail Though I haven't kept them myself, I remember reading that quail tend to be much quieter than chickens (especially when compared with roosters!), require a smaller area to live and are well suited for suburban backyards. They and their eggs can be eaten and are generally considered a delicacy. Here's a basic introduction about them: http://www....


3

There isn't much to do at all. Chickens are just fine in snow and at night pile on top each other for warmth. The primary issue with cold weather and chickens is crop freezing. So pick a cold-hearty breed such as wyandottes, which are known to be very resistant to that problem. Obviously the chickens will want access to clean, dry nest boxes for laying ...


3

We've been keeping chickens for a few years now, and in my experience they don't seem to mind a few hours without access to the nest boxes. They will sometimes lay an egg in other places, we get to know their favourite spots, and often they wwill just hang around the entrance waiting for you to finish. Last year when we had more hens, they often all wanted ...


2

I have kept some chickens in the past and let me assure you, they eat anything. I've observed these little dutch bantams catching frogs and mice... Also, slugs, worms and other harmful insects in my cabbage patch - as well as the cabbage underneath :-( You should really try to allow them to roam free and forage for themselves (MIRG may be an option). They ...


2

Avoiding the topic of meeting all dietary needs, an early and/or cold resistant grain mixed with early corn works well. More robust grains like spelt, quinoa, hard red wheat, and amaranth can provide most of the carb and protein your girls need. Amaranth is particularly attractive due to it's nutritional density and ease of harvest when grown by the small ...


2

I use free range chickens to help with lawn management. They do an excellent job and do not destroy the lawn if they have enough space to roam. Any breed will do. I now cut the grass only a few times each year so they save me lots of work.


1

In commercial chicken operations, it's down to the question of conversion rates of feed, and it varies by breed, and that translates directly to small farm operations (though the rates go down as management gets less rigid). Here's a brief article that gives you an idea of the scope. Rotate their pasture and farm bugs in the fallow areas if you can.


1

yes. it will reduce hock burn.


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