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Home compostable standards The Australian AS 5810 is a standard that guarantees composting at low temperatures. Heavy metals and plant toxicity requirements are similar to those for industrial compostability (AS 4736). Biodegradation and disintegration however need to be performed at ambient temperature instead of at elevated temperature (source) The ...


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The general rule of thumb that I have heard is no. I can't seem to find a good resource at this time that breaks it out conclusively, but the logic that I have heard goes as follows. Composting happens at different speeds and different heat levels. Your typical worm bin tends to operate at a low temperature (otherwise the worms would bake!). This would be ...


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Conventional plastics All conventional plastics marked with the 1 to 6 resin identification codes are recyclable. Some types are more easy to recycle than others, for example recycling PVC is more difficult than PET. Also very little polystyrene (PS) is recycled simply because it is not cost-effective to do so. The majority of conventional plastics is ...


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It doesn't appear that there are any specific studies comparing the environmental impact of dog waste disposed of in biodegradable vs non-biodegradable bags, however there's quite a bit of work that's been done to compare these two types of plastic, considering production, use, and disposal. Bio-based and petrol-based plastic production comparison One of ...


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The point of compostable plastics is that they can be processed in the same way as the rest of the garbage stream they are mixed in with. If a fast food outlet uses 100% compostable packing and cups etc, then they can compost everything in their bins without having to separate. The process start off with a fine shedding and mixing of everything, so ...


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The problem with PLA-based plastic is that it requires high temperatures and moist conditions for a relatively long period to actually degrade and turn into compost. Theoretically it is possible to compost it along with all other compostables (food leftovers, garden wastes), but PLA takes much longer to fully decompose than 'normal' organic waste and it ...


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Sugarcane and natural fiber are your best bets, but even they won't hold up to hot wet food over time. You could consider corn-based plastic, but these are biodegradable rather than compostable; still that's better than styrofoam. You may also be able to find better prices on your heavy duty lined sugarcane or natural fiber containers if you buy very large ...


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The pen you just used up Paper Mate offers a free recycling program that doubles as a charity fund-raiser. Only Paper Mate pens are accepted. Send your used writing instruments to The Pen Guy who uses them in art projects (with the actual pens/pencils, not the ink!). He is aiming to collect one million used pens. In Canada, you can drop off old writing ...


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I found information about composting conditions on this website: The conditions PLA needs to degrade are exposure to temperatures greater than 140°F (60°C) and relative humidity greater than 90%, for approximately 60 to 80 days. This is confirmed in this paper where it also says that: ...once exposed to the proper combination of oxygen, moisture ...


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