11

An interesting question you pose. I'm writing my answer via a computer that is 7 years old and has been using GNU/Linux for 3 or 4 years. The battery or battery charger no longer works, but everything else does, and everything else is original. When I got this computer, new, it run Windows NT. After about 3 years it was virtually unusable due to the ...


8

According to this link, an average router will use 6w. Leaving it on all the time will therefore use approximately 0.14kWh per day - about the same as using a 60W laptop for 2.4 hours, or boiling a kettle once. While it will make a tiny difference if you turn it off, there are many other things you can do that will save a lot more energy.


7

Definitely YES. As currently supported versions of MS Windows (7,8,10) now will have problem to run on older machines with RAM under 500MB and CPU under old Intel Core2/CoreM, you can find plenty Linux distributions with equivalent functionality, which are supported and will run on even lover configurations. Therefore some platforms as RapsberyPi was ...


6

In fact there is an actual increase in energy consumption, though not much. What is done at the end devices is one thing (the encoding-decoding part). This answer from stackoverflow provides a good example: When Google switched Gmail to use HTTPS, no additional resources were required; no network hardware, no new hosts. It only increased CPU load by ...


5

It undoubtedly uses more energy to leave a computer on than to turn it off. A PC will draw a few hundred Watts when on, compared to a few Watts powered down but plugged in. The biggest hardware failure issue (and the one in the accepted answer to the linked question) tends to be hard drives, potentially leading to data loss as well as the need for hardware ...


5

I will address just a tiny part of your (great) question. It seems to me that a key factor is the simple fact that Microsoft is a huge corporation, who delivers a software used by hundreds of millions of computers, tablets, smartphones. It's deeply entangled with a whole industry based on fashion, software/hardware obsolescence, status symbols. It's ...


4

The terms are used in different ways in different contexts I'm going to define them: centralised computing: every device does its own computing distributed computing: device sends off as much computation as possible to other computers For example, to supercomputer users "centralised computing" means sending jobs off to the supercomputer, but you're talking ...


3

I found (parts of) 2 studies but as far as I can tell neither included readability. 1. Consumer Reports At the bottom of the first article you link to, they credit the original source and link to this Consumer Reports webpage. However that page was updated earlier this year and it seems the original report is not available anymore. Other sources (like this ...


3

It's a better question than it appears at first. Consider the amount of energy consumed by data centres, the proportion of data held and transferred in graphic formats and the increasing use of png. The effect on power usage in data centres and communication systems will be an important consideration for the decision makers. The end user's energy use, ...


3

AFAIK there hasn't been much research on this topic, at least not about energy consumption of encryption on a global scale. Most research I've seen is concerned with the impact of specific types of encryption on the battery life of wireless devices (e.g. this article or this article) Estimates are that the ICT sector is responsible for around 0.6% of the ...


2

Yes, you are on the right track. You need to measure or estimate how much less electricity is used after your optimization, and multiply that by the (average) emissions caused by generating electricity. 1. Calculating electricity usage reduction If your calculation is done always on the same server, then you may be able to find out how much energy you ...


2

Not much at all. Since we waste more electricity waiting for a page to load with your monitor on. You would probably reduce your environmental cost by reading faster and not staring at the screen to think - leaving your monitor off as much as possible. This may help regarding the over all cost Using a tablet to read and recharge the batteries with a ...


2

OK, writing on a used piece of paper is hard to beat. Because you own the laptop already and the paper is from the waste I would say the remaining factors are the pencil vs. the energy and the computers wear. Then it starts: How is your energy produced? What kind of pencil? What's the livespan of your computer? Since I'm quite sure there is no definite ...


2

As you probably know, the whole tech industry is not very sustainable. Actually far from it. Most manufacturers obviously don't really care but even for the rare concerned company it's very hard to make any significant steps. (Mines…) So to answer you question: For your requirements I would say it's the most sustainable option to use a second hand laptop ...


1

I wish to look at this in terms of CO2 footprint, rather than ink consumption. Some random source on the internet suggests that the CO2 footprint of a toner cartridge is around 5Kg for a new cartridge or 2Kg for a refilled one. The laser printer in my office gets around 31,000 pages at 6% coverage, or around 2,000 pages 100% coverage. Arguably with 30% ...


1

Yes, definitely! While today we often think of sustainability considerations as secondary, up-and-coming, or even fringe, at some point in the future (hopefully soon!) they will be a standard and even primary component of any business model. In the same way, information technology and computer science were once secondary considerations - and today they are ...


1

Look at your system usage right now. Is anything near maxed out? Very unlikely. I'm only using 1% of my CPU right now. Although that must mean my system is using less power than if it was at 100%, it can't possibly be scalable with every other components power consumption. By "distributed computing" do you mean like Folding@Home which can use your spare CPU ...


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