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Bacteria grow well at temperatures between 4 C and 60 C, generally, the warmer the better for the bacteria. Generally refrigerators are set to operate at temperatures around 4 C. Freezers operate at temperatures below zero degrees Celsius. Most bacteria do not thrive in such cold temperatures. Mould/Mold also like warm temperatures and as with bacteria, the ...


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Having shut off many fridges and freezers for storage, I can tell you exactly what happens and why. It will quickly become contaminated with mold The interior of a freezer has some plastic "skin" to present a surface that is more aesthetic and easier-to-clean than galvanized steel. However, the freezer does not stop at the skin; behind the skin is ...


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One way to increase the efficiency of an upright refrigerator or freezer is to fill up all of the "unused" airspace with something that won't flow out of the unit every time your open the door (as air will) nor facilitate convection heat transfer from the bottom to the top of the compartment even when the door is closed. If you have some plastic ...


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So if you only need a small capacity and high energy efficiency, one model that is popular in the sailing community is https://engelcoolers.com/ They have a reputation for efficiency. Can be used with 12/24v DC or 110/220 AC There are cheaper brands, but whether that is the most economical in the long term is another issue.


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10 CFR 430.32 - Energy and water conservation standards and their effective dates is the U.S. government standard defining (among other things) how energy consumption of refrigerators is to be tested. The standard references the test procedure AHAM HRF-1-2008, developed by the Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers, an association which "is an ANSI ...


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A properly made normal thermometer will function perfectly well in a refrigerator, as you describe. As with all mercury based thermometers be careful not to break it. Cleaning up and then dealing with the released mercury would be problematic. If that were to happen contact the waste disposal department of your local municipal council and get advise because ...


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Although it seems logical that a refrigerator would be more efficient since it doesn't have to keep things as cold, there are a few different factors affecting real-world performance. Freezers are simpler to operate. In a freezer there's only a top end on the temperature range. From refrigerator manufacturer LG you can see the range in the refrigerator is ...


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Some years ago I read of an off-grid farmstead in Australia that used a conventional chest freezer as a refrigerator. The way he did it was to use a probe and temperature controlled relay to turn the freezer on and off. He added 2" of closed cell XPS polyurethane sheet to the front, ends and top, but not the back, as the radiant grid was under the skin ...


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Nutshell answer: Residential use: nil. Commercial use: Significant. Any reasonably large building has a larger problem getting rid of extra heat compared to heating. All those lights and photo-copiers add up. Many commercial buildings and large facilities like University campuses will buy power when it's cheap at night and use it to chill water or brine. ...


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There are ways but not without adding to existing systems. When I was in the service our furnaces were just like yours 70’s . We did have swamp coolers, I installed an over ride switch to turn the house fan on. The cool air generated by the swamp cooler was circulated through the home and cooled the upper floor by more than 20 degrees F . (I added the bypass ...


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No, it would be expensive and not effective, it only recirculates air in the house. What works very well is a "whole house fan". It can be located anywhere despite the instructions to centrally locate it. I have one in a utility room at the corner of the house; open windows in rooms that need most air. Of course you are limited to the outside ...


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Imma use metric here. If you explore this field any more, you'll be swimming in metric, so might as well jump in now. 0C is freezing, 100C is boiling point (212F), and body temperature is 37C. Use a fluid-sourced refrigerator. Your refrigerator is a heat pump. It is using a fluid (a type of freon) to pump heat from inside the fridge to outside the fridge. ...


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It appears that some of these thermostats have "compressor delay protection," such as this one: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01HXM5UAC/?th=1


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I think the greatest efficiency improvement can be obtained by cleaning the condenser coils on the bottom and/back . In a home unit the coils,especially on the bottom collect a lot of lint , pet hair , etc. Vacuum them annually or more often. I have also added aluminum window screen to protect the coils from lint. If you use foam ,I think you will find ...


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No, closing the air vents will increase your energy bill. The added pressure from closing a vent can cause air leaks in your system, causing long-term and unnecessary energy waste. The heater or air conditioner will produce the same amount of air whether or not you have them closed. Not recommended.


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