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12

I understand that the main principle in permaculture and related (e.g. Fukuoka) is that of planting a garden, which is more or less a perpetual motion machine, self-sustaining and strong enough to support a person/family/community living off it. In accordance to this principle, the most important point is to design a garden that self-sustains. For example, ...


9

Surely it makes sense to move the planting around into some sort of rotation scheme? The backbone of most permaculture plantings are perennials, including trees and shrubs. These, being more or less permanent plantings, do not lend themselves to rotational schemes. You could, however, as mentioned, rotate some of the plantings in the herbs layer under them ...


8

Why do existing systems continue? There are several reasons. There are many ways that the current system does work. Perhaps not in the long-term sustainable sense, but in the sense of feeding billions of people every day. That's not a small feat. The existing system has an entire global supply chain built around it. A different system would need a ...


5

It is my understanding that there have been studies proving nutrient depletion in the soil of conventional farming. These studies (Haughley Farms in the mid to late 1930's) at which time states more people should be made aware of the facts that organic farming methods are far more sustainable than conventional. Such as in the area of chemical fertilizer and ...


3

What to do with waste products, if not feed them to animals? Organic (of or relating to an organism) waste products all compost and if you want everyone in the world to live on grains and vegetables then you want all the compost you can get. In fact, you want to start using some of the waste products that the west mostly does waste already (nightsoil). ...


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