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15

It depends on what power you can produce and the efficiency of the equipment you use to convert that mechanical power into electrical power. As a moderately fit 50+ cyclist, I can produce over 200 W for five or so hours, 300 W for much shorter periods, and levels around 1 kW for less than a minute. A commonly quoted efficiency for electrical generation is ...


5

Before you worry about charging, consider this: It takes about 85W to propel a 75kg cyclist at 20km/h under ideal conditions. Thin film (i.e. flexible) solar panels have an efficiency of ~9% and when deployed as an overhead canopy would likely deliver no more than 50W/m² in mid-latitudes. To generate the required 85W you thus would need a panel 1.7m² in ...


5

BBC1's "Bang Goes the Theory" demonstrated a human-powered home in a TK programme. In this segment, 8.5 kW of power required 70 cyclists, of fairly typical fitness, or about 107W per cyclist. The full programme shows running a household of four for twelve hours utilising 80 cyclists, working with breaks. The example isn't highlighting low-power draws, but ...


1

Based on the information on the product site, I would say no, the Food Cycler is not a good option for composting. Its method of operation prevents actual composting. Instead, it is primarily a mechanical homogenization process ("Agitators quietly break down the food waste into small particles") combined with sterilization ("sterilizing the by-product ...


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