7

On the positive side economically you are expanding the market for sustainable products, which will help lower their price and make them more likely to be developed. Another reason to make the effort is that the grandchildren of the people who aren't pursuing sustainability may be, for example, traumatized like the grandchildren of war criminals, and wish ...


7

Another sustainability aspect of bitcoin (and cryptocurrencies in general) is the electricity consumption of mining: "The electricity used to mine bitcoin this year is bigger than the annual usage of 159 countries" (http://businessinsider.de)


5

There are lots of ways to subcategorise renewables, for example: Indirect + direct solar (wind, wave, hydro, biomass, biogas, PV, CSP, solar thermal, - and what's used up here in all cases is incoming solar energy), versus others (tidal & geothermal) Combustion (biomass, biogas) versus others Heat engines (geothermal, biomass, biogas) versus others ...


5

The sustainability of fiber farming Cotton, Bamboo, and Hemp all depend heavily on the cultivation methods being used. That being said we can compare the function stacking ability of these crops. Organic Cotton is an perennial plant that is grown as an annual crop so requires effort and Energy every year to get the crop started. It also require a great deal ...


5

Sustainability = the ability to continue a particular behavior, lifestyle or process indefinitely Living off the grid = living without using public supplies of utilities such as water, electricity or natural gas Green = beneficial to the environment. A problem with the above definitions is that many people will disagree and define these terms ...


5

It's reasonable to say that a lifestyle can still be sustainable even if not everybody could live that way. It's like filling a niche in an ecosystem. Obviously we can't all eat discarded/excess meals, but there is certainly room for such behaviour to be part of a system that is sustainable as a whole. You almost certainly can't live that way your whole life ...


5

There isn't really a single agreed-upon definition of sustainability. Everyone has a basic idea of what it is, but the exact meaning differs from person to person. Most common definition The most common and often-cited definition of sustainability, or to be more precise that of sustainable development, is the one in the Brundtland report "Our common ...


5

Broadly speaking the two are orthogonal. That is, financial sustainability isn't related directly or consistently to environmental sustainability. Specifically, there are examples that swing strongly in both directions. At one extreme, you have subsistence farmers or hunter-gatherers who don't use value-based exchange at all, and different groups of those ...


4

The issue with answering this question is that there are inherent assumptions in how one creates a boundary for answering. For example, Voreno's answer suggests comparing two similar products in terms of the eco-footprint of their lifecycle. This is sound, but assumes that use of any product is warranted, and that levels of use and maintenance are fixed. ...


4

However, in the cases of wind, solar, and geothermal, this isn't so obvious -- nothing is being used up (at least not in a measurable quantity) which would need to be renewed. Furthermore, there's no need to manage wind, solar, and geothermal energy -- it isn't possible, on human scales, to overuse these. For wind and solar there isn't a "store" ...


4

The social signals you send might well be more important than the economic ones. Consumers are not rational. Look at what people spend money and time on - it does not make them happier. We know what causes mental well being (such as these five steps). So people's consumption is highly illogical and does not follow economic theories of maximizing happiness. ...


4

Yes, to a certain extent. In economics this is called the 'rebound effect'. The rebound effect is that the effectiveness of a new techology or measure is reduced because it is counter-acted by other parts of the system. To give an example: people who insulate their house tend to keep their house at a higher temperature than before the insulation was done. ...


4

they remove the centralised middle man from individuals transactions Indeed. However, this doesn't mean that the resulting system is more sustainable. people will be able to use a more secure version. Security is not the #1 concern with BTC. I would be much more worried about volatility. Providing security is an engineering exercise. Stability, however, ...


3

Industrialization and globalization don't really want to "do" anything. These are social descriptions to abstract the behavior and actions of people. The problem is that a capitalistic society tends to not allocate costs properly, especially environmental costs, without government regulation. Feedback loops that would ordinarily limit or constrain people and ...


3

Your life is never worthless if you are setting a good example. You can increase the worth of your efforts by spreading the word, by setting up programmes in your area to help people recycle etc, you can help your less able neighbours "I'm going to recycling, shall I take that stuff of yours?". Do not lose heart.


3

Actually with wind power it may be possible to overuse them. From the wiki article: "Environmental Impact of Wind Power" Weather and climate change Wind farms may affect weather in their immediate vicinity. This turbulence from spinning wind turbine rotors increases vertical mixing of heat and water vapor that affects the meteorological ...


3

No, decentralised currencies won't help society be more sustainable. Removing the role of a Central Bank makes it much harder to cope with macroeconomic changes in circumstances. There's nothing sustainable about making the whole economy more volatile. am making the assumption that decentralised communities are more sustainable That's a really big ...


3

No, it's not sustainable. As per your comment, you're not doing anything economically productive, but you are consuming goods and services. It doesn't matter that those goods and services are free to you at the point of consumption - what matters it the consumption itself, which is happening without you contributing to economic replenishment. That's not ...


3

I don't think it's as simple as two contexts. Just taking "sustainable" in the sense used by environmentalists, corporate "sustainability policy" covers everything from the goals of an organic farming co-op through to the greenwash applied by the nuclear industry. These days almost every company has a sustainability policy, just as they have a policy against ...


3

Yes and no. Item price doesn't include 'externalized costs' E.g. An item produced in China or under Trump's toothless EPA will likely have greater associated pollution compared to a similar product produced in a nation that has strict pollution laws. This one is hard to find information about. All the 'externalized costs' estimates I've seen are just ...


2

I think this is a good question. From my experience, developing an understanding for sustainability is best done via "criticism, questioning, discussion, and voting" as Highly Irregular mentioned. The reason for this is that the definition of sustainability can vary greatly (depending on the scope with which you analyze something, or the domain you ...


2

Many free-market advocates would say that the two should be equivalent. One can reasonably argue that they would be equivalent if every consequence of a given action were reflected fairly in its financial cost. An example of this is that producing electricity from coal is currently cheaper than producing electricity from wind farms, but this might not be ...


2

Ӎσᶎ summed up what corporate sustainability is about. I want to try a different angle. On one hand, at all scales the basic question is the same: What goes into your system (stuff, energy), what comes out (stuff, waste), where does is all come from and go to? What does this mean for sustainability? What can I change (choosing different inputs, avoiding some ...


2

I think this is a very good question which is quite a challenge to permaculture. The answer depends on what it is you are trying to sustain. My understanding of the aims of permaculture is that it attempts to sustain the people dependant on the system while minimising other impacts. So it aims at sustainability at the household scale. What this doesn't ...


2

Communities are more than what currency they are using, whether Bitcoin or cash or debit/credit cards (considering a debit/credit card as a proxy for cash). Thinking about what makes a currency useful there are a couple of important characteristics: stability of value, portability, and acceptability for transactions. Bitcoin fails on two of these at the ...


2

What are the gotchas in comparing the prices of similar objects to determine sustainability? What do you mean by "sustainable" (an early question here). Some people focus only on short-term financial sustainability ... "do I have enough money to buy this?". A more documented example of the other extreme is The Green Party(s), who have ...


1

Sustainable: To continue a practice over a long period with little or no impact on the underlying resource. I don't think that "sustainable" is an absolute. And too many people are using it that way. E.g. "Meat animals are unsustainable" "Coal power is unsustainable" "Organic farming is unsustainable due to weed issues" "Zero till is unsustainable due ...


1

There is no standard for this, but if a city offers its own recycling pickup or works with a small number of pickup companies, it would be simple to track recycling pickup quantities and consider that to be the diversion rate as a percentage of regular waste pickup. Otherwise, the city could simply measure the reduction in waste pickup compared to ...


1

There's a term used which may apply to such a lifestyle: freeganism. From Wikipedia: Freeganism is a practice and ideology of limited participation in the conventional economy and minimal consumption of resources, particularly through recovering wasted goods like food. The word "freegan" is a portmanteau of "free" and "vegan". ...


1

I wouldn't focus on negative answers... It's ALL POSSIBLE! Yes it is sustainable... At least for one person as well as you are doing already, dealing with unconscious waste. MAYBE it will be sustainable for an entire family, moreover if you are all CONSCIOUS human beings and focus on some CURRENT tendencies in that direction around the world (YES, you're ...


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