Stack Exchange Network

Stack Exchange network consists of 175 Q&A communities including Stack Overflow, the largest, most trusted online community for developers to learn, share their knowledge, and build their careers.

Visit Stack Exchange
25

I found an article at this old house which listed ten ideas that I filtered down to these which might work in a city apartment: Melt Ice. Spreading ash along the surface snow and ice covered walkways gives extra traction and helps melting due to the darker color absorbing more sun energy. Clean glass fireplace doors. You can use a damp sponge and dip it in ...


7

This only addresses part of your question, but this question could be answered with a whole book. Homebrewing Biodiesel I do want to clarify that biodiesel is not only a potential "industrial" reuse for used cooking oils. Used cooking oil can be processed into biodiesel by a modestly savvy do-it-yourselfer at home, with a simple processor that you can ...


7

One of the key considerations here is how much time the appliance will spend turned on. If an old CRT TV is hardly used, then the environmental footprint of continuing to use it is very low, even if it uses 5 times as much electricity as an LCD one. Secondly, the way the electricity is generated makes a substantial difference. If renewable energy is used to ...


6

Yes -- with caveats. It will decompose. Even motor oil will decompose. (Don't use this as a way of disposing the used stuff. It has lots of ungood things besides oil by the time it's used.) However it will attract animals, dogs, cats, squirrels, mice, rats, bears, porcupines,chickadees, bluejays... A better solution: Mix it with oatmeal, or some ...


6

There is a market for human hair: Hair can be sold to people who create wigs or hair extensions. There is even an online calculator to determine the value of your hair. Apparently hair is a good animal repellent so some gardeners will gladly take it (altough others say there is no proof for the effectiveness). Hair is an organic material that can be ...


5

You can compost the oil / grease if you have the room. It's just not as easy to do as most kitchen waste. Oil tends to make your compost pile anaerobic, so its gets smelly and can attract vermin. But if you have the space for a second (or more) composter / compost pile, and can control the vermin, it will work. Since the pile will likely be anaerobic, just ...


4

This might help answer the question, as some reasoning has been given with the advice: In New Zealand Disposing of old smoke alarms When your smoke alarm fails, you can put it out in your normal rubbish disposal. On average, a cubic metre of New Zealand soil is about as radioactive as 13 smoke alarms. Disposing of smoke alarms in a landfill ...


4

Don't break it into pieces and breathe the dust. And don't eat it. Avoid doing those two daft things, and you'll be perfectly safe during disposal. The smoke detector itself is electronic waste, and should be handled accordingly: so find an electronics recycler, and give it to them. It sounds like your local Kidde aren't being very responsible manufacturers ...


4

You can compost vegetable oil but when doing aerobic composting the disadvantage is that oil will reduce the amount of air that can get in your compost heap. If you add too much oil and/or don't aerate your heap properly the compost will start to smell and turn into an anaerobic process. Additionally oil may attract animals. Recycling the oil via a local ...


3

While you have dismissed it in your question, I'd say that the best way to dispose of old oil is to convert it to Bio-Diesel and burn it - that reduces the amount of conventional Diesel that is dug from the ground, or made from virgin plant oil (which has the associated issues of using fertile ground for fuel instead of food). Oil-fuelled vehicles are going ...


3

You can also consider using vegetable oil as fuel for diesel vehicles modified for such purposes. There may be a site for people running on vegetable oil in your area, and you could donate your extra oil for this use. You should also be aware that you can reuse cooking oil if you strain and refrigerate after cooking, and don't take it over 375 degrees F ...


3

Biogas This is not for DIY (as far as I know), but I know that it can be turned into biogas through fermentation. In my city (Zurich, Switzerland) food scraps are collected and they specifically request for fats and cooking oil (also liquid ones soaked up by a paper towel). Of course it's up to debate how sustainable that is.


2

Burying it is a bad idea particularly for lead acid batteries. The case will eventually break down, then the solutions will leach downward into the water table. Here we have to put down a $10 deposit on a car battery. The deposit is waived if we bring a battery with us. The current limit for Pb in water is 5 ppb. And there is some discussion that ...


2

Firstly: Reuse of the oil for food use isn't a good one. Oil goes rancid. This is why you change the oil in the fryer. Alternataive uses: Here most restaurants have a grease and oil bin in back. It's collected to make soap. No reason you can't make your own soap. I use solid fat to make bird food blocks. The school I get it from changes the grease ...


2

Get a pig. Or some chickens. You still need to follow some hygiene rules before feeding them meat scraps, check your local agri/health advisory office.


2

There is much more at stake here that just the car fuel. Batteries contain all kinds of metals that have to be mined and processed, that are a danger when released into the environment (e.g. seeping out of landfills), and that can be re-used when the batteries are properly recycled. Just collect your spent batteries and then once of twice a year, hand them ...


2

In your question you assume that it is then processed into biodiesel. This is not always the case, for example it can be converted in lubricating oil and glycerol to make soap. In the abstract of the paper Applications of Waste Cooking Oil Other Than Biodiesel: A Review many examples of applications apart from biodiesels are listed. It can be processed to ...


1

A: Reexamine your life style. How are you producing this fat? Can you produce less? Looking at our life, we probably produce about 4-5 tin cans of fat a year. When the can is full, it goes in the food garbage if it didn't get sidetracked to the dog dishes. (We have 3 garbage streams -- anything with food; recyclables -- paper, plastic, metal all meeting ...


1

The most sustainable way is reuse. Perhaps you can eat the leftovers later, or use it as ingredients for soup. As others have also suggested here, you can feed leftovers to animals if you have them (like a dog, chickens or pigs). But be warned that local regulations may not allow this! For example in the EU you are not allowed to feed kitchen scraps from an ...


1

Are you on a biodynamic septic system? Flush them. The bacteria should chew them up happily.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible