5

It undoubtedly uses more energy to leave a computer on than to turn it off. A PC will draw a few hundred Watts when on, compared to a few Watts powered down but plugged in. The biggest hardware failure issue (and the one in the accepted answer to the linked question) tends to be hard drives, potentially leading to data loss as well as the need for hardware ...


3

This Zero Carbon Britain report gives a detailed answer to your question. Their plan sees emissions being reduced to 8% of the current levels, and the rest being balanced by carbon capture. This requires, they suggest, setting aside around one third of Britain's land area for carbon capture and one sixth for fuel (bio-fuels ... land area for solar isn't in ...


2

tldr: yes, with sufficient political will, an incremental approach is sufficient - we could decarbonise our energy consumption in 20 years. There are still a lot of unknowns (like just what we do about long-haul aviation, intercontinental shipping, cement production). However, some things we can be sure about, and one of them is that there's way more than ...


2

I found a few different references for this: 10 g CO2e per paper towel (from the Guardian, 2010) 10 g CO2 per paper napkin (from Treehugger, 2009) 7.3 g CO2e per virgin paper towel (from MIT/Dyson study, 2011) 7.4 g CO2e per recycled paper towel (same study) While several of these studies are looking at hand drying (for which I wrote an earlier answer), ...


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