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Cotton industry produces hundreds of time more volume than the Hemp industry does. Cotton: world production estimate is about 25 million tonnes. Hemp: approximately 37000-45000 tonnes fiber - most of it used by the specialty paper's industry It allows cotton industry to do huge Economies of scale, making the size of the primary intrans and transportation ...


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The sustainability of fiber farming Cotton, Bamboo, and Hemp all depend heavily on the cultivation methods being used. That being said we can compare the function stacking ability of these crops. Organic Cotton is an perennial plant that is grown as an annual crop so requires effort and Energy every year to get the crop started. It also require a great deal ...


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The United States Federal Trade Commission reports that many "bamboo" fabrics are simply rayon that had been produced using bamboo as a raw source material. This appears to be the prevalent method of producing fabrics from bamboo, and several companies in the USA have been penalized for false advertising as a result of claims they made regarding "bamboo" ...


3

Your assumption seems to be correct -- consuming paper towels demands about eight times more energy than machine-washing and hang-drying reusable rags made from discarded textiles. In order to provide an answer that fits within the character limit, I'm going to focus on energy as the measure with which to compare paper towels against machine-washed rags. ...


2

It would help if you mentioned what type of fabric you are planning to use since there are several types of fabric. In the U.S., wool is pretty common and can be purchased through small websites. Since you are in Asia, perhaps you can look into cashmere or silk and look for "organic" producers, probably very difficult since certification is not as organized ...


1

This is highly variable depending on the material. For example, if the textile is made from oil-based materials (i.e. plastics), disposing it improperly might accelerate the microplastics problem in oceans. You could: Burn it, to offset other fossil fuel uses, preferably in a large commercial waste incinerator Bury it underground in a landfill, to make it ...


1

That will very much depend on the material from which it is made. Assuming that the clothing cannot be repaired, the next best thing to do is to re-use it - for example, cut the cloth into squares and use them for cleaning, instead of buying new cleaning cloths.


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Fed says inflation will rise but not fast enoughAs a hemp clothing retailer I can tell you that I mostly just get the product from the manufacturer and pay about 50% of what they sell it for. I dont mark it up to the full 100 though but nobody is really buying that stuff right now so in that way it is more of a novelty. Because the manufacturer knows I will ...


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