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Like all organic matter banana peels can simply be buried & allowed to compost in place. My grandmother preferred this method to piles & just dug a new, small hole every day- one beside the other- in the grass alongside her multiple planting beds. In the course of a year she went all around her yard! Banana peels are especially valuable because they ...


5

As this reference states, Shelf life depends on the degradation mechanism of the specific product. Most can be influenced by several factors: exposure to light, heat, moisture, transmission of gases, mechanical stresses, and contamination by things such as micro-organisms. Product quality is often mathematically modelled around a parameter (concentration ...


5

It's reasonable to say that a lifestyle can still be sustainable even if not everybody could live that way. It's like filling a niche in an ecosystem. Obviously we can't all eat discarded/excess meals, but there is certainly room for such behaviour to be part of a system that is sustainable as a whole. You almost certainly can't live that way your whole life ...


4

From many references, e.g. this good one, The best foods to offer birds in colder weather have a high fat or oil content that will provide abundant energy for winter survival. Nutritious winter foods for birds include: Black oil sunflower seed Hulled peanuts or peanut hearts Nyjer (thistle) seed Suet mixes with seeds or fruit Peanut ...


4

We used to throw away our banana peels and all other fruit and vegetable peels in our veggie patch, but they take a long time to decompose and also invite snails. Especially the orange peels, which are a good amount of biomass are a good attraction for snails. We now collect peels until they fill up our grinder, and then grind them before throwing them into ...


3

They compost slowly even by the standards of my undersized compost bins. But the big lumps can always go back in for another go. If you have access to a garden shredder, put them through that first. It's designed to handle wood, unlike your kitchen equipment. In the garden they can also be used as a mulch. Burn them (for heat perhaps) if you've got the ...


3

There's nothing particularly magic about banana peels compared to other peels. But if you're putting these in the garbage, you totally should stop doing that and use them in your garden. Cutting up individual peels and adding them to the garden is way too much work for me. Instead, I have a small lidded bucket on my kitchen counter. I add all fruit peels, ...


3

No, it's not sustainable. As per your comment, you're not doing anything economically productive, but you are consuming goods and services. It doesn't matter that those goods and services are free to you at the point of consumption - what matters it the consumption itself, which is happening without you contributing to economic replenishment. That's not ...


2

I can only answer regarding the actual plant. If food wastes need to be trucked all around Sweden when the incinerator is down the road, the picture may be different. Biogasification of food wastes, market wastes and similar stuff is certainly better, for the reason you describe in your last paragraph: Kitchen wastes are typically 70-80% moisture. ...


2

The date is determined by local\federal law based on all of the reasons listed above. It seems Water normally only has a two year best by date. If properly stored that 2 year shelf life on water can be longer. Id recommend boiling and filtering after two years however.


2

If you find that certain foods are contributing to a lot of "scraps," try googling that specific item to find if there is an alternate use for them. If there is none, and you can't find a creative way to reuse or reduce the production of the scrap (see more on this below), then you can consider garbage vs. disposal. In regards to those options, you could ...


2

When you seal everything airtight the contents of your bin will start to decompose anaerobically. There are no big problems with this, but there are a few downsides: anaerobic decomposition is slower than 'regular' aerobic composting during anaerobic decomposition methane gas is formed which is a much more potent greenhouse gas than the CO2 that comes from ...


2

I assume you are already putting some or all of the egg shell in with your plants. I looked around and using egg yolk as a fertilizer has several issues. If you have an outdoor compost pile you could add them to that, but mixing large amounts of animal protein in a compost pile can be problematic, so I would use caution depending on how much plant organics ...


1

The “it would go to waste” is often a marketing gimmick. Much of that produce would be sold anyway or it would be used for juice, purée, etc. where the end user doesn’t see the “ugliness” anyway. To check for local alternatives: grocery stores (even mainstream) have a section for discounted ugly produce that’s tucked away in a hidden corner, farmers ...


1

The quantity of imperfect produce that never makes it to market is staggering. This is a huge opportunity for enterprising individuals who are able to recognize how much money can be made by simply identifying useful sources of waste. Nevertheless, the nuances of your question imply much more than the the basic economic aspects of the equation, even though ...


1

Any organic material decomposing in a anaerobic or near anaerobic situation will produce methane. I question your assumption that the source in landfills is mostly food in origin from individuals. Other sources: Processing waste -- All those corn husks, apple pulp from making applejuice. Grocery store waste -- imperfect veggies, old food. Yard waste. Grass ...


1

I can't imagine this will cause you any problems. The only difference is the anaerobic (no oxygen) bacteria will be doing more work in your sealed container instead of aerobic bacteria (requiring oxygen). Aerobic is faster. But as you have no use for the hummus (sad). You should be fine. Here's a link: if you are more interested


1

There's a term used which may apply to such a lifestyle: freeganism. From Wikipedia: Freeganism is a practice and ideology of limited participation in the conventional economy and minimal consumption of resources, particularly through recovering wasted goods like food. The word "freegan" is a portmanteau of "free" and "vegan". While vegans might avoid ...


1

I have added banana peel to my garden compost bin in the past but how quickly they break down depends on the climate. Here in Northern England our weather is generally fairly cool so the banana peel only breaks down slowly. I use homemade garden compost as a general soil feed in early Spring.


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