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25

TL;DR The chart is misleading since it compares carbon imprint by mass instead of a measure of how much a human needs to survive. Argument The chart you link contains false comparisons. They are comparing mass of foods against each other. However, you don't eat for mass, you eat for calories (or protein or nutriment, or whatever). A better comparison ...


20

Personally I use a wire rack over a cookie sheet to drain fried or greasy foods. The oil drips to the pan below and I can pour the oil into a container or dispose of it however I need to.


16

1kg of cheese takes around 10kg of milk to produce (more for some cheeses - e.g. parmesan is around 1:16; less for softer cheeses). So the carbon footprint of cheese is going to be at least that factor higher than that for milk (there will be a little extra from any heat/energy input into the cheesemaking process but this will be small). Sources: http://...


14

In How to Grow More Vegetables, John Jeavons claims you can sustain one person on 4,000 sf (372 m²), with 60% of that space dedicated to interplanted grains and legumes. The rest of the space would be taken up by high calorie root crops (30%) and vegetables (10%). That's with high soil fertility and in a climate with at least a six month growing season, so ...


12

Yes, being a vegetarian is more environmentally-friendly than otherwise This question has been asked and answered on Skeptics Stack Exchange, based on a claim by PETA to that point. Full details are in this answer. To summarise the summary: Production of meat is a major source of anthropogenic greenhouse gases. A vegetarian diet therefore leads to less ...


12

There are several reasons for this. Some are subjective and some are objective. producers use different breeds of animals and different strains of plants. Instead of selecting for taste, they may select for fast growth, disease resistance, appearance, transportability (eg an apple or tomato that stays hard and won't bruise) and so on. If you have access to ...


11

Example of two edible plants growing in Europe which can be used as a drinking straw: lovage - This plant is being used in salads and soups. The stem could be about 30 cm long and 2 cm in diameter. The plant has a pleasant aroma somewhat similar to celery. Here is an example of lovage as a drinking straw. "Liebstöckel" by 4028mdk09 - Own work. Licensed ...


11

To add to Chris' answer, I'd say eat them after doing the usual look-, smell- and taste-checks. Above all, make sure the can hasn't been deeply dented, is rusty or is bulging; in those cases, don't even taste-test it: the severity of botulism (or any other illness originating from bacteria in preserved food) is just too serious to take the risk (and, talking ...


10

Jon Seymour, in his book The Complete Book of Self-Sufficiency, mentions that 5 acres (about 2 hectares) of good quality, well drained land could sustain a family of 6 persons. The answer to the question will partly depend on whether or not one chooses to consume meat and dairy products and whether or not the land should also provide timber for energy. ...


10

Though locally "canned" food refers to food in a metal can, I understand that in the USA the term "canning" is also used for preserving food in glass jars. I suspect you're talking about metal cans anyway. If the can is made of metal, the metal can start to corrode (ie react with oxygen) soon after the can is opened, especially since salt in the food can ...


10

There are two relevant disadvantages to beef: Cattle produce a lot of methane, which is a greenhouse gas. The amount of land (and energy, and fertiliser) needed to grow enough grass to feed enough cattle to provide enough beef to feed a human is many times more than that required to grow crops to feed the human directly. This is generally true for eating ...


10

I've done this to get a drink from a very shallow spring (seep really) Most grasses stems are small in diameter, and you have to suck pretty hard to get fluid through them. In addition, you have to cut the stem with an eye on the nodes (fat bits) in the stem. They aren't hollow there. If you are serious about this, look at some the varieties of bamboo, ...


10

There is a difference between reuse and recycling. Reuse is using a container again without major modifications. Recycling is transforming a container into its core elements and using that to make an entirely new object. AFAIK industrial reuse of plastic food packaging isn't done anywhere because of the risk of bacterial contamination. Many plastics are ...


10

Eat them. Then look into what the different types of expiry date mean. Tins, dried pasta and many other foods have a best before date based on guesswork about quality. Most foods sold chilled and some others have a use by date based on safety. I won't try to convince you to ignore use by dates though I don't always stick to them myself. Display until dates ...


9

Air is much more energy intensive. Gucwa and Schaefer looked at the impact of scale on energy intensity in freight transportation, and the chart below is taken from that paper. They looked at varying loads, across four modes - the line in the lower left is trucks, the cluster above it is air, the long spread-out light grey dots in the bottom-right is ships, ...


8

That very much depends on how good a gardener you are. At least the following factors come into play soil fertility weather (esp. sun & rain) length of planting season I remember a quote from Bill Morrison I heard from a recorded lecture that, with permaculture methods, one can sustain a family (2 adults, 2 children) on 50m² (with around 2 hours of ...


8

There are two very obvious answers to this. First, which no one has mentioned, is that the sense of taste deteriorates with age. The meat &c probably hasn't changed, YOU have. (In much the same way that I sometimes think gravity is quite a bit stronger than it was a few decades ago :-)) Here's one reference, of many: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/...


7

Tune your fridge. We keep ours just barely above freezing. Enough that if we get a package of hamburger out of the freezer it takes several days to thaw in the fridge. We don't throw much away -- about a 2 gallon compost bucket a week, and that includes all the peels. Plan your meals to use leftovers. We routinely make twice as much rice as that meal ...


7

As for saving energy in the fridge, vegetable storing does not make a difference.* If you want to prolong the life of your produce to reduce waste, it depends on the vegetable. Many veggies and greens generally need to 'breathe', so non-sealed bags/containers or just in the 'crisper drawer' is good. You can buy specialty bags such as perforated ziplocs or ...


7

I would argue that by using non-dairy you are already putting yourself into the top 20% of low impact because any plant based alternative to dairy is significantly better than dairy itself. As you have pointed out the question of one type of plant over another then becomes quite subjective. The only other thing you could consider is looking at the attitude ...


7

From the Encyclopedia of Country Living by Carla Emery, which I cited here before and can warmly recommend to anyone: This makes about 5.5 sqm per kg of rye (grain or flour, doesn't really make a difference).


7

Several news outlets and popular science publications have reported on this subject in the last few years. Often, the focus is not specifically on vitamins, but on nutrients in general (i.e. "phytonutrients"). One study often cited is Donald R. Davis' publication from 2004 that showed that 6 out of 13 nutrients had declined (statistically significant) in ...


6

Figures for land area have been stated, it is perhaps important to consider where that land is, its inherent soil quality and type, inclination towards the sun, altitude and longitude, precipitation - or available atmospheric moisture to be extracted - and short, medium and long term long term climate conditions. That's one heck of a lot of variables to ...


6

I think Western kitchens have a much different focus on foods, as well. Meat is often the center of many meals, for instance. I find efficiently storing (freezing, thawing, cooking, storing prepared meat) to be difficult to manage without waste. Your choice of foods can dramatically decrease your waste. I recommend using more curries (stored as curry ...


6

I like to use wire cooling racks, brown paper bags, and cloth dishtowels dedicated to this endeavor would work for draining. Paper towels you do use might be compostable.


6

It's not an all-or-nothing scenario. It depends on how beef is raised. Poorly fed (e.g., corn fed) cattle and cattle on an open range will have negative effects on greenhouse gas levels and land quality. In contrast, managed grazing of cattle can have a positive effect in both regards. Here is a starter link for more info on why beef production can help ...


6

(Draft answer till I get around to find some figures) There's a few ways I see to go about this: Running a Haber Bosch process or similiar with a non-fossile source for energy and H2, or finding other N sources. There's principally two routes, N fixing plants in crop rotation + organic fertilizer and reusing N-rich wastes and wastewater. The key difference ...


6

TLDR; it depends on what you want to grow, but generally speaking a depth of 20-25 cm (8-10 inches) suffices to grow many vegetables and herbes, but do investigate if your roof supports such a weight because a rooftop garden can become very heavy when it's soaked with water! Once you are set up, rooftop gardening is similar to container gardening. The main ...


6

You seem to be well aware of the "cooking applications" of lard, but just in case you haven't heard of it, I'm particularly fond of Schmalz a German spread made from lard, together with small amounts of pork scratchings/cracklings, apples and onions. (For example, see here for a basic recipe.) As for candles, you can make about 12 candles from 2 pounds of (...


6

Would levying taxes on non-organic meat be an effective means to reduce consumption and thus reduce the environmental harm? Yes. But. It would add complexity compared to just taxing all meat, and thus make the tax less efficient. The increased costs would be the primary cause of reduced consumption. Whether only taxing conventional meat would have a ...


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