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According to figures from Alko (the Finnish state-owned alcohol distributing organisation), producing packaging for a 1,5 L (~4 gallons) wine pouch creates 96 g (~3,3 ounces) of CO2e/L whereas a 0,75 L (~2 gallons) traditional glass bottle hits almost seven times that figure at 675 g (~23,8 ounces) of CO2e/L. Source Additionally, the answer depends on your ...


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The simplest answer I could find comes from this 2019 New York Times interactive about food and climate change. Based on a serving with 50 grams of protein, the average greenhouse gas impact of beef is 17.7 kg CO2 and the average impact of cheese is 5.4 kg CO2. So to conclude: beef is worse than cheese for global warming. But be careful to note their caveats:...


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You will not be able to sustainably hunt and fish on land you actually own. You can't buy enough land unless you are wealthy. Hunter gatherer bands typically have hundreds of square miles per band, and often had a seasonal migration route. E.g. Move to a particular prairie region to harvest camas bulbs; to a stream for the salmon catch; to a marsh for the ...


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Also worth noting that these figures are based on a "high productivity" Wisconsin farm. I've got nothing against Wisconsin, the problem is the huge reliance on results from a single farm. A large part of the dairy related emissions are in the form of methane .. and dairy farmers in NZ appear to have achieved significantly lower emissions by changing the ...


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Europe produces bananas. The come from Spain, in particular The Canary Islands and the fruit is called Platanos (which is Banana in Spanish). You can identify them because they use this stiker


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I can't think of any leguminous trees which produce edible fruit. Olives are the obvious trees for a dry Mediterranean climate. Then the citrines and Almonds Wallnuts and sweet chestnuts. But if you are emphasizing dryness what about coming down to ground level with pineapples?


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The “it would go to waste” is often a marketing gimmick. Much of that produce would be sold anyway or it would be used for juice, purée, etc. where the end user doesn’t see the “ugliness” anyway. To check for local alternatives: grocery stores (even mainstream) have a section for discounted ugly produce that’s tucked away in a hidden corner, farmers ...


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The quantity of imperfect produce that never makes it to market is staggering. This is a huge opportunity for enterprising individuals who are able to recognize how much money can be made by simply identifying useful sources of waste. Nevertheless, the nuances of your question imply much more than the the basic economic aspects of the equation, even though ...


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The answer by Jean-Paul Calderone correctly specified how much population the food can support. I'm not focusing on that at all in my answer; I'm only focusing on energy. This answer, however, did not take into account energy aspects, only mentioning than an unlimited supply of natural gas is needed. That is most certainly false: methane can be created with ...


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Our World in Data recently put together an interesting chart on this topic. From the article "You want to reduce the carbon footprint of your food? Focus on what you eat, not whether your food is local": The article provides a specific (extreme) example for someone in the UK getting beef from their neighbor, vs a ranch in Central America: ...


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There is an extensive study by the UN Food and Agriculture Organization: Tackling climate change through livestock. Their key facts and findings summary has a comparison between cow and small ruminant (i.e. sheep and goats) milk. The comparison is done in terms of kg of CO2 equivalent emissions per kg of milk protein produced. The conversion from milk to ...


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