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If you can eat it and not die, it's probably reasonable to compost it. Tons of those additives are used yearly, small quantities in the compost system would not be significant.


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According to figures from Alko (the Finnish state-owned alcohol distributing organisation), producing packaging for a 1,5 L (~4 gallons) wine pouch creates 96 g (~3,3 ounces) of CO2e/L whereas a 0,75 L (~2 gallons) traditional glass bottle hits almost seven times that figure at 675 g (~23,8 ounces) of CO2e/L. Source Additionally, the answer depends on your ...


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The simplest answer I could find comes from this 2019 New York Times interactive about food and climate change. Based on a serving with 50 grams of protein, the average greenhouse gas impact of beef is 17.7 kg CO2 and the average impact of cheese is 5.4 kg CO2. So to conclude: beef is worse than cheese for global warming. But be careful to note their caveats:...


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You will not be able to sustainably hunt and fish on land you actually own. You can't buy enough land unless you are wealthy. Hunter gatherer bands typically have hundreds of square miles per band, and often had a seasonal migration route. E.g. Move to a particular prairie region to harvest camas bulbs; to a stream for the salmon catch; to a marsh for the ...


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It's not that difficult to make plastic from strong sugars. The trick is to make plastic from less expensive weak sugars like wood chips. One company making plastic from wood chips has given up on a quick biodegradable action because of shelf life requirements of food. https://www.avantium.com/technologies/dawn/ Here is another link in the news: https://www....


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Europe produces bananas. The come from Spain, in particular The Canary Islands and the fruit is called Platanos (which is Banana in Spanish). You can identify them because they use this stiker


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The answer by Jean-Paul Calderone correctly specified how much population the food can support. I'm not focusing on that at all in my answer; I'm only focusing on energy. This answer, however, did not take into account energy aspects, only mentioning than an unlimited supply of natural gas is needed. That is most certainly false: methane can be created with ...


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Our World in Data recently put together an interesting chart on this topic. From the article "You want to reduce the carbon footprint of your food? Focus on what you eat, not whether your food is local": The article provides a specific (extreme) example for someone in the UK getting beef from their neighbor, vs a ranch in Central America: ...


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There is an extensive study by the UN Food and Agriculture Organization: Tackling climate change through livestock. Their key facts and findings summary has a comparison between cow and small ruminant (i.e. sheep and goats) milk. The comparison is done in terms of kg of CO2 equivalent emissions per kg of milk protein produced. The conversion from milk to ...


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