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The old farmers' rule of thumb is that you can harvest a cord of wood per acre per year. (For everyone not in the US, a cord is a unit of measure equivalent to 128 cubic feet of tightly stacked firewood, or 3.625 m3. An acre is about 0.4 hectares. So the rule of thumb corresponds to about 9m3/hectare.) (For anyone questioning the validity of this estimate, ...


12

Wood is close to the most eco-friendly building material around: It's renewable. It's production overall pulls carbon out of the atmosphere. Material tied up in construction is carbon that isn't in the atmosphere. A lower fraction of its cost is transport since the building grade wood is sourced locally when possible. The issues people have with the ...


10

While wood-burning fireplaces have a shorter carbon cycle than coal and gas derived heating and help you to get off-the-grid, they are in no way "clean". The pollution emitted from a domestic fireplace is much worse than the equivalent pollution emitted from dedicated power generation plant for the same amount of heating. The pollution is also local to ...


8

Well, I'm by no means an expert on giving this answer, and yet I'll take a go at providing something reasonable. Assuming a 1ha biodiverse, properly hydrated, young stage forest with optimal leaf coverage that gives us a solar catchment area of 10,000 square metres. Subtract say 20% to account for immature trees amongst the larger growth, another 20% for ...


7

A forest of old trees sequesters more carbon per year than a forest with the same quantity of young trees. When I first saw this question I thought I knew the answer -- trees grow faster when they're young, therefore they sequester carbon at a higher rate. When I went looking for the data to back this up, I found that this is still a somewhat controversial ...


6

True sustainability is not dependent on outside sources. Try to learn the art of coppicing for fire wood, along with growing self propagating plants such as black locust which grows fast and produces more saplings along the root system and then can be cut for wood within a year or two. You would not need to purchase trees often once the coppice method is ...


6

Conservation It is a fundamental law of physics that matter/mass/energy (all being, ultimately, the same thing) cannot be created or destroyed — they just change form. Under 'normal' conditions on Earth, any carbon atom that exists will continue to exist in perpetuity. It can and will form temporary bonds with other atoms to form distinct substances with ...


5

As LShaver writes, larger trees sequester more carbon than smaller trees, but only if they are still growing. In a "fully-grown" forest (as per the title) that process has ended — decay and regrowth are in equilibrium. Fully-grown forests are carbon-neutral. All of them. The Amazon rainforest — all 5,500,000km² of it — is carbon neutral. If you plant a ...


5

I am not sure I am qualified to answer all your questions but here are the ones I feel qualified to answer. Phased selection The first point I would make is that trees in the wild do start off in dense thickets and naturally self-select as they get larger. I would expect that this has a number of benefits for the soil such as reduced erosion. I would ...


5

Coconut tree and Bamboo are two alternatives of timber i can think of, if you want wood's characteristics you mentioned. strength acceptable rate of biodegradability you'll worry about how to preserve it instead safe for the environment just chop em up and burn (as fuel) However it only work if the source is near your place (plant them yourself or with ...


5

Be gentle with an existing forest. If your trees are already in place, then you may put the biochar directly in place around the trunks of the trees you want to help grow. You may rake the soil to put the biochar beneath the normal humus forest ground, to avoid it to be washed away to quickly. Depending on how you created your biochar (it may contain more ...


4

We kept 70 - 80 wild guinea pigs in the back of our lot for perhaps four months. They free-ranged the pasture during the daytime and slept in sturdy cages at night. Every few weeks we would move the cages, till the manure into the ground, and plant a garden. Here are some insights: 1) The guinea pigs did a fantastic job of eating down about half an acre ...


2

How much energy could we actually gain from biomass from a given forest size if it was actually green? Primary productivity is the term used to describe the rate at which energy is converted into organic material via photosynthesis. Deciduous temperate forests have a net primary productivity of: ~6000 kCal/m²/year ~16 kCal/m²/day ~67 kJ/m²/day ~0.0186 kWh/...


2

I think a review of photosynthesis is in order. The CO2 plants take in are actually stored as sugars. Burning this will release it, but wood that decomposes naturally would have those sugars broken down by animals and fungi etc (who will release co2 via respiration) but will actually use much of that carbon to build their own bodies and keep the carbon ...


2

Typically, where I live, forestry professionals use solid cubic meter of wood as the primary measurement. But, let's define all of the measurements. In this answer, I use the metric ton (1000 kg) as the definition of 1 tonne. Loose cubic meter of wood is the amount of wood that will fill a container of 1 cubic meter, if the wood is thrown there in random ...


1

Yes and no. The answer to the question you asked is yes. Biodegradation produces carbon dioxide and heat. The heat of biodegradation will be wasted. It makes much more sense to usefully harvest the heat stored in wood, and thus, not letting it biodegrade but rather burn it in power plants. However, you seem to think there are only two options: ...


1

The simple answer is that burning it would be roughly carbon neutral (it releases what it absorbed during growth) versus letting it decompose where it would be a carbon sink. Fossil fuels in the ground came from this vegetative carbon (+ millions of years and pressure). Burning renewable fuels is considered better than burning fossil fuels in the ground ...


1

Buy degraded/abused land in strategic locations (which should be cheap as a result). (Re-)Plant trees. Place a conservation covenant over the property so that future owners are legally required to preserve it. In Victoria, Australia, organisations like the Trust For Nature can help with this process. If you're not sure what a conservation covenant is, ...


1

I'll start with my own answer including some examples I'm aware of to help set context, and I'll highlight in bold some uncertainties. This will be a community wiki so we can build this list together and clarify uncertainties over time. Actions Today Contribute to non-profits and charities focused on forest conservation, reforestation, and sustainable land ...


1

Summer can be a bad time for planting trees. I normally overlay a google map with topography and design on that map. I am not an expert on companion planting with the species you list, but a fungal dominated environment would benefit forest / tree system. Wood chip mulch will encourage fungal activity, remember rabbit guards rodents also like wood chip ...


1

No animal no person could or should do the work for you. You HAVE to put some time and effort into learning about these plants, their height, width, how fast they grow, whether they need low pH or high pH, how much sun they need, are you able to chop your yard into different, separate sections so one section could be less than 6 pH and another 7 pH? Have ...


1

Well, steel that is recycled in arc-furnaces produces less air-pollution than iron-ore processed in blast-furnaces. One way to increase the recycling of steel would be to use stainless-steel which would be more valuable in recycling. Now 304L and 316L are available in standard structural shapes and are designed for simple arc-welding. Then 304L and 316L ...


1

A good sustainable substitute for wood is Clay and Stone as they are renewable and stronger than wood. Although it is costy, it is worth it


1

I have been cutting poplar trees for firewood on my 11 acre mixed use property for a few years now , since I have retired . I discovered many 50 to 60 foot tall trees , straight with few limbs , and 12" to 15" and more at the base . Last year I cut 30 down of these large trees and wound up with 6 cords of stacked firewood , cut and split. 5 trees to the ...


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