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13

The big problem in the US is with expectations. I remember the first time I ordered a beer in Quito and it came in an obviously re-used bottle and I was both amazed (in a pleasant way) and shocked at the same time. Bottle re-use is obvious. You see wear lines develop around the bottles. This is one reason I think remanufacture is preferred to re-use in ...


13

In Germany there is a system, just the way you describe it. It is something like, anything container that contains a drink, which is not a milk product has to charge extra money for the container (e.g. bottle), which is to be refunded on return of the container. (Aluminium cans are also exempt.) There is a special word for this amount of money, which at the ...


10

I have seen broken glass (± 1" (~25 mm) square pieces) used effectively as the drainage backfill around a residential foundation. The owner reported that it worked very well. An internet search shows other situations where the crushed glass is used as aggregate in construction, including some cases where the aesthetics are used to an advantage. See ...


8

Good question, the german recycling system can sometimes be a little overwhelming. First, don't mix up "Pfand" and "Recycling". "Pfand"-bottles will go back to the manufacturer, be cleaned and reused. None of your pictures belongs to the "Pfand" system. But all three can be recycled. The glass-bottle should be the easiest: search for the nearest "Glas-...


6

I studies Physics in the days when a Physicist made their own equipment; a mandatory subject was scientific glass blowing. There are various kinds of glass. The main type used for ordinary bottles and such is soda glass. This answer will focus on this glass. Soda glass can be worked (from memory) at around 600°C. So if you had some glass rods or tubes, you ...


6

This is one of those economics things. Small towns often have very cheap landfills. Glass in the landfill is not particularly harmful, it's just bulky. The uses mentioned above glass is essentially competing with either gravel or sand. So it has to be roughly the same price. If there is a reasonable dumping fee at the landfill then glass doesn't ...


6

In the UK, milk bottles used for home delivery of milk are reused (being collected by milk deliverer). This system has been in place for as long as I can remember (50 years) - and probably a lot longer. I remember that, about 30-40 years ago, there was some serious discussion of standardising other drinks bottles, to allow reuse, but this was opposed by ...


5

After reading carefully about the question on internet and how other have fix their glass' frame, It is known that acetate frames (or any other thing made of Acetate) can be "melt" using Acetone. You must be sure that your frame are made of pure acetate, which was my case. I dipped both broken parts into acetone for about 2 minutes I sticked them together ...


5

Depends a lot on where you live, but if you have the possibility to refill your own glass bottle, then I would call that the most sustainable option. In this part of Europe (Hungary/Romania) there are machines like this one, locals call them "iron cows". The milk comes from local farmers, but it is collected and tested by a company. The price of a liter is ...


4

Just to expand on Werner's excellent response as well as your original linked article: Pfand eligible bottles will usually have some sort of designation on the bottle itself; often times there will be an icon like this and / or the term "Pfandflasche" on the label. Most grocery stores will have an automated kiosk like this to return them and you will receive ...


3

Check out Sugru http://sugru.com/ It is a self setting silicone that cures in 24 hours. I have used it to perform a number of repairs, and it is pretty amazing stuff. I repaired a pair of sunglasses with Sugru when the arm broke. The arm remained in a fixed open position, but it worked until my wife folded the fixed arm and broke it again. Most useful ...


3

Energy input for a given crucible is the main factor. You need energy input to exceed losses from radiation, and some convection and minimal conduction to give net energy gain so temperature will rise. While notionally you can achieve this with as little energy input as you wish, in practice it helps to have a healthy net energy input so that losses are ...


2

You forgot about a fourth option: The tube. Originally it looked like this: It was a bit flimsy and is easier punctured than the TetraPaks, so it isn't produced anymore (at least not in Germany, at least not widely). Still, over the past years it got a redesign. Now it can stand up on its own, is a bit more resilient to puncturing and it also comes in a ...


2

Well, here's an "out of the box " answer to broken glasses. If it's at the bridge and a pretty even brake use some electrical heat shrink tubing. It comes in lots of colors (including clear) it's cheap and it's soft on the nose too. I recommend judicious use of a lighter to shrink it as it's more focused than a heat gun and shrinks it tighter. You could ...


1

Here there is a very interesting case study by the government of Oregon. It is not as specific as you want but they give a lot of figures to understand the cost of processing and collecting glass and to give a quantitative estimate of the average saving caused by recycling. You can find much more examples googling , like this British one, which is much more ...


1

The state of Oregon (U.S.) just began a beer bottle re-use system: "Oregon Launches First Statewide Refillable Bottle System In U.S." Bottles are collected throughout the state by the infrastructure that already exists to collect bottles for recycling. From the article: [The] new bottle [was] developed by the Oregon Beverage Recycling Cooperative, the ...


1

In Canada we return wine and beer bottles and beer cans, and the super large water bottles you see used in water coolers. You pay a deposit when you buy them, and you return them to the place you bought them (mostly; wine bottles are returned to a place that sells beer, not wine, because they have the contract.) Time was, the beer bottles were all the same ...


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