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Burning grass is effectively carbon-neutral: the carbon dioxide released will get pulled right back out of the air next year as the grass re-grows. Cutting it and letting it decompose would also be carbon-neutral, just taking longer for the carbon dioxide to be released. If you want to stop the grass from being burned, you'll need another argument. I ...


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I found a few different references for this: 10 g CO2e per paper towel (from the Guardian, 2010) 10 g CO2 per paper napkin (from Treehugger, 2009) 7.3 g CO2e per virgin paper towel (from MIT/Dyson study, 2011) 7.4 g CO2e per recycled paper towel (same study) While several of these studies are looking at hand drying (for which I wrote an earlier answer), ...


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There is a 2016 report on the Carbon Footprint of Railway Infrastructure from the International Union of Railways [Union Internationale des Chemins de fer: UIC]. They express it in terms of a pay-back time: how long it takes to cancel out the emissions caused by construction through savings thought to come form reduced air and road transport. This begs the ...


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There is a 2018 study by microsoft which finds that "the Microsoft cloud is as much as 93 percent more energy efficient and as much as 98 percent more carbon efficient than on-premises solutions". The savings they are talking about come from replacing in-house servers with cloud resources. I don't know of any studies which look at the impact of just moving ...


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