6

This is a very open ended question. Much of this depends on the scale of operation, and your climate. You specifically said grey water, so I'm assuming this means laundry, dishwater and bathwater. The chief grey components are going to be food waste, body dirt, and soap. There will be a minor component of oil or grease. A good system would have a float ...


3

Your shower water is already going into the same waste pipe that sewage from the toilet or septic system empties into. I think if you have a lot of soap you might end up with soap suds or scum inside the tank of the toilet, but I don't think that it would hurt the waste infrastructure in any way.


3

I was faced with a similar question a couple of years ago. The best solution I could come up with was to feed the grey water into an area occupied by plants that consumed 'large' quantities of water and continuously dropped leaf litter. The leaf litter would layer on top of the particulates in the grey water and provide protection to the micro-organisms ...


2

Gray water has grease in it. Soap etc. For this reason you need a grease pit above the holding tank. Septic tank. The water can then filter from there back into the ground. Both need cleaned regular. No overflow. I live on a island also. Our water is charcoal filtered for the tap. Some what like America used in the 60s. Our well water I do not drink. ...


2

It seems you are correct: As long as your greywater lands in a septic system that ultimately infiltrates the greywater into the aquifer, you are not really wasting water. Also, as you indicate, irrigation would be an other issue due to evapotranspiration. What I don't know is how the freshwater treatment on your island works. If, as you say, there's a ...


2

I have just started recycling our Laundry Grey Water on a farm in Australia through the Toilet Cisterns. I initially had an IBC 1000litre tank on 200 litre (44 imp gallon) oil drums outside a verandah with a step down from the verandah floor of about 300mm (1foot). The washing machine would only just pump in when the tank was empty and no way would fill ...


2

Assuming you can get the appropriate variance or exception from municipal and state health and building codes to put drain water into the toilet feed at all (which is unlikely in the United States), the low cost solution uses a combination of height (which fluid systems use all the time to create pressure differentials) and a second tank. There are a few ...


1

Another strategy with human & animal waste involved is growing algae from the effluent to purify the water, recycling it then cheap and easy, uniits are insulated, LEDs via fiber optics climate controlled for 24x7 growing. This supplies biodiesel to the village, enough for heat & to replace diesel use, vehicles to snowmobiles. Nobody makes the ...


1

One possible solution would be to construct mulch pits around trees, etc. and then discharge the greywater directly into the bottom of the mulch pits. The mulch pits will help decompose any grease/particles and the phosphates, etc. should help feed the trees. Select soaps that are low in sodium. Sodium can be toxic to plants in high enough concentrations. ...


1

The main problem with recharging an aquifer with grey water is contamination, or further contamination of the water in the aquifer. If the aquifer is the island's sole source of drinking water it is best not to contaminate the aquifer by putting grey water into it. Very soon the water from the aquifer will become undrinkable & the island's population ...


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