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Most folks don't know that their 'frost free fridge' can be easily hacked to act as a dehumidifier. As it runs continuously, it can be used to suck unwanted moisture out of a humid home 24 hours a day. Frost free fridges actually have a heating element. This heating element comes on every-so-often to thaw out the cooling plate. Any frost/ice that has ...


4

Domestic flywheels are unlikely to happen for 3 reasons: They must be heavy to store significant energy. If you need a crane to install one at your house it’s never going to be super cheap, even with high volume manufacture. The risk of the spinning mass fracturing requires special safety precautions - commercial operators put them in the ground but that ...


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The short answer is no, not anywhere close to 200ppm and not appreciably lower than ambient conditions. The modern standard for buildings is a full air change every three hours. This means your houseplants would need to achieve your target level on a full house volume of air every three hours. There is no practical arrangement which will achieve this. ...


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EnergyNumbers has a good answer (+1), but why don't you measure it and let us know? Of course "efficiency" is a little ambiguous. Green house gas production? Just your $$? The latter is easier, the former changes over time. Get one of those power meters for the plug and see what it uses overnight. Most space heaters are ~1500 W, which is a lot. Your power ...


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I'd say that you need to analyse the use you get from each appliance, and how inefficient the current ones are - for example, if you only use the dryer occasionally when it's too damp to dry clothing on a line, that's probably a lower priority. I'd probably go for the following order: Refrigerator - This tends to be on all of the time, so it's always using ...


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That's a great question! The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) says the main reason to clean is eliminating mold, critters & other toxins, and since your gunk is dark colored it could well have mold spores so I'd vote yes. (They include lots of advice on finding, hiring & checking contractors' work, too, so it's useful as well as authoritative!...


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I doubt it. I recently bought a century home (renovated 30 years ago) where I cleaned the ducts too. There was no noticeable change in costs. Cleaning helps keep the air fresh, and your furnace filter might last longer, or at least be more effective for longer. Plus mould spores, etc. Be very careful on whom you choose. This is one of those "industries" ...


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One option is to place materials that absorb or adsorb water from the air into the house. Such materials include silica gel, clay and other mineral soils, and calcium chloride. The amount of water this materials can deal with likely makes them part of a solution, not a solution on their own. These materials may also need to be "recharged" or replaced ...


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If one's desire is to "To reduce, offset, or eliminate the impacts of new-build housing on the local environment in the most cost-effective and conventional ways possible" then this should be done in the planning/design/construction phases of a new development/build. Once the development/build is complete, it is too late — far too late — to do anything that ...


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I know you asked for a book, but until then, have you ever come across this youtube channel? Townsends has videos not only about recipes but also about different techniques of building stuff around the house, in the good old 18th century way. I found them when I was watching videos about baking bread, they have a nice one about how they make an oven out of ...


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It will depend on the age of the appliances. The refrigerator had a significant effect on my power bill. Next up is my water heater. They calcify at the bottom, limiting their efficiency over time (like your kettle). A measure of this is if you can actually get 40 gallons of hot water out of your tank - i.e. how many hot showers. Plus tanked water heaters ...


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If you shut off the heat to the rest of the house, the rest of the house gets cold. And while this reduces the gas bill, it doesn't reduce it as much as you think. You have cooled off the mass of the house, so it takes some extra gas burning time to make up for this. To put numbers on this you would need to do the following: Record the amount of gas used ...


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You pay indirectly for local landfills, regardless of where other waste is made. If people paid directly for their waste, the choice between recycling and landfill would be obvious. As an aside, I was recently at a place where they labelled their bins: "recycling", "landfill", which brings the question of options into starker relief.


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