10

Aquaponics seems to be popular lately. The idea is to grow both vegetables and fish, using the nitrogen-rich fish water for the vegetables. This can be done very small scale and with very limited resources and has the great advantage of using the waste water for something useful. You can build the fish tanks wherever you like, around corners, up on a shelf, ...


9

You're confusing concepts. Chickens are used to prepare the ground prior to the planting of the food forest. They weed the ground, fertilize and lay eggs. They are confined inside moveable fencing, and any domestic breed will do the job. In no universe do they mow lawns. See http://www.treehugger.com/sustainable-agriculture/using-chickens-plant-food-forest....


9

we actually bred snails for quite a while on 6 boxes of 1 square meter. I never weighed the annual production, but these 6 square meter were by far sufficient. We actually stopped breeding snails because of "overproduction". They were fed on our vegetables garbage. The problem with snails is not so much the insufficient area to feed them, but more the ...


8

There are two important variables and one important caution here. The caution is that containing grasshoppers in an area may be very difficult, You may have to have insect screens fully covering an area. Keeping flying migratory livestock contained is somewhat difficult. The variables regard climate. Grasshoppers don't survive freezing so you have a ...


7

FORGET chickens, bucko. They might eat seeds and seedlings but in no universe I know they actually cut grass down. My goodness. If you are wanting A LAWN forget about hiring goats, horses, cattle...sheeps. That is fine for pasture but you'd have to be able to rotate them before they eat down to the crowns and demolish any grass plants you have. If you ...


7

Silvopasture refers to practicing forestry and animal husbandry (grazing) in the same area. It isn't clear from your question if you're trying to raise animals in an existing forest or if you're trying to reforest a grazing area. I don't know of how you'd do this in a "wild nature" context, but practices that I've heard of would include harvesting the wood, ...


6

In large numbers, horses are more problematic than cars. According to Eric Morris, in 1898 delegates from around the world gathered to discuss urban planning. The issue they were "desperate" to solve was what to do about horse manure. Rutgers University has a fact sheet about horses and manure. It states that a 1000 lb horse will produce about 9.1 tons of ...


6

Chickens are not lawn mowers. They eat grass, but they select what they like (plants with relatively large leaves are preferred, like clovers, Plantago, etc). So you have no uniform cutting. They like also much the ground, so they will start to throw away grass in patches, so that they can delouse (if it is dry) or looking for worms (if is is more humid). ...


5

I think the main problem is that commuting is almost never "eco-friendly". There's a lot of energy that's needed to carry your behind (and your carriage) from your home to your workplace. I think the most efficient way to commute it is to use public transport, for which the weight-of-vehicle to weight-of-passenger ratio is lowest. For trains, the amount of ...


5

To be honest, I think this part is somewhat self-defeating: But how to best utilize a forest for animal husbandry, in the way that hopefully interferes with wild nature as little as possible? From a permaculture perspective the goal isn't to avoid interfering with nature, but to try to ensure that interference is constructive. In other words, ...


5

Great Pyrenees (Pyrenean Mountain Dog) If you're in an area with a high-threat of animal attack (bear, wolf, coyote), consider 1-2 dogs specifically bred for the purpose of protecting livestock. This breed, specifically, has deeply-bred territorial instincts - which make it a desirable watchdog. They are capable of long-term, independent action and are ...


5

I would use a donkey. The dairy and sheep farmers I visited in the UK as a child used them, and there's a field of cows near me that has a pair of donkeys in it. When I go by on my bike, the donkeys clearly and obviously arrange themselves protectively between me and the cows. (We have coyotes and wolves near us - you can hear them howl at night and a ...


3

The cost of "Organic" dairy At least within the United States, certifying something as organic requires time, effort, and paperwork. There does exist an additional administrative burden for farmsteads wishing to market their products as organic, but if we are invested in the organic method as part of a greater commitment to increasing sustainability, then ...


3

We've been keeping chickens for a few years now, and in my experience they don't seem to mind a few hours without access to the nest boxes. They will sometimes lay an egg in other places, we get to know their favourite spots, and often they wwill just hang around the entrance waiting for you to finish. Last year when we had more hens, they often all wanted ...


3

There isn't much to do at all. Chickens are just fine in snow and at night pile on top each other for warmth. The primary issue with cold weather and chickens is crop freezing. So pick a cold-hearty breed such as wyandottes, which are known to be very resistant to that problem. Obviously the chickens will want access to clean, dry nest boxes for laying ...


3

When I visited Peru, EVERY house had a guinea pig pen in the back yard. Peru doesn't prep food like north Americans do, so there was a lot of husks, stems, trimmings, peelings. These went to the guinea pigs. They were either used by the household, or sold to street vendors who would sell barbecued GP on the street. In 1969 you could get one for about 20 ...


3

From Guide for Organic Livestock Producers.pdf @ www.ams.usda.gov/nop I will make a case for yes, microchipped animals are organic but then again I am not affiliated with USDA so you might want to check with them. CHAPTER 18 PHYSICAL ALTERATIONS The term “physical alterations” refers to irreversible procedures that alter the natural appearance or ...


3

There are a few factors to consider which would change the results, such as: Animal welfare issues What sort of animals you're eating What you feed the animals on How much of the animal you're prepared to eat For example ruminants such as sheep/cattle tend to have more of an impact on global warming due to higher methane emissions. However they may also be ...


2

Pretty much everything is toxic if you have too much of it. Water, for example, can be toxic to humans. The trick to not going insane in this world is to stop looking at lists on websites that claim things are toxic and just approach the issue with logic and caution instead. If there is no grass in your paddock, your sheep are starving, and you put up a ...


2

I use free range chickens to help with lawn management. They do an excellent job and do not destroy the lawn if they have enough space to roam. Any breed will do. I now cut the grass only a few times each year so they save me lots of work.


2

When you got the rabbits last winter, did you get any guarantee of their age. As a general rule, Does stop breeding at about 4 years old while Bucks stop at about 5 or 6. I don't have any literature to back this up as this is just from personal experience but I'm sure you can google this. Since they all stopped breeding at the same time it is likely that the ...


2

poultry. if you and your family eat animal protein the rewards might be worth it.


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