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So the short answer is to look at 'life-cycle assessment' studies (LCA). The longer answer is to ask what you mean by 'better', and then look at a bunch of LCAs and figure out what impact categories you care about most. In either case, the goal of LCA is to collect all the different inputs and outputs for a product for all stages - not just use, but ...


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Fuel consumption is typically 70-90% of a vehicle's lifecycle energy consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, so there are lots of circumstances where upgrading to a significantly more energy-efficient vehicle makes a lot of sense. See, for details TRL VR6 and The UK Automotive Sector: Toward Sustainability. If the vehicle being replaced gets a very ...


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I find the site CarbonCounter.com, developed by MIT, useful in approaching this question. You can play around with some of the assumptions on e.g electricity supply, battery manufacture emissions and vehicle lifetime. Under most reasonable assumptions, for vehicles of comparable size, hybrids are better than pure ICE, and EVs better than hybrids (unless the ...


1

I have driven a hybrid since 2000 and noted that I get 39.6 miles per gallon. This is primarily due to the fact that I do mostly freeway driving. I do get much better gas mileage when using city streets. This is because at lower speeds the hybrids will use the battery for power in place of gas. So when looking at a car you may want to take into account your ...


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