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13

The typical Permaculture approach is to cultivate habitat for animals that will eat the insects. It is hard to say without knowing more about the insects but if they are aphids, maybe ladybugs will be helpful. If they are big beetles, maybe frogs and lizards. And don't forget birds! In general it is important to cultivate habitat first before trying to ...


12

Here are some ways you can help protect your plants from insects: Fertilize and water your plants regularly. Insects are less likely to infest healthy and well-nourished plants. Pull weeds around your plants as well. Insects such as aphids and stinkbugs feed on weeds; if they surround your plants, they're likely to attack them as well. Plant herbs and ...


9

Since nobody answered, I thought I’d post an answer with what I’ve been able to find out myself Types There is a list of 7 different neonicotinoid insecticides on Wikipedia: Acetamiprid Clothianidin Dinotefuran Imidacloprid Nitenpyram Thiacloprid Thiamethoxam Some say that Sulfoxaflor is also a neonicotinoid, but not everyone agrees with this. The ...


8

There are two important variables and one important caution here. The caution is that containing grasshoppers in an area may be very difficult, You may have to have insect screens fully covering an area. Keeping flying migratory livestock contained is somewhat difficult. The variables regard climate. Grasshoppers don't survive freezing so you have a ...


6

You should try boric acid. Yes, it is an acid, but it is safe enough to be used as an eye wash for medical purposes. It is also toxic to ants and safe to use around the kitchen. I'm not sure if you consider it sustainable or not, but mixed with powdered salt or sugar, it gets rid of ants quite effectively. I'm not quite clear on what you mean about non-...


6

Compost probably won't work, as you need something that emits carbon dioxide. Something starchy (eg potato, flour), chopped into small pieces, and mixed with some yeast and water may still work as well as sugar. However, as @THelper says in his comment directly against the question, the swamp is probably the wrong place to put a trap to get an effective ...


5

I just came across this page as I was looking for a list of products with neonicotinoids in them. I found a list for the UK and another one for the US. The Xerces Society link includes links to additional articles with slightly different lists of products. I have also heard nurseries use potting soil with neonicotinoids in the potted plants they sell. Haven'...


4

My position on mosquitos is that they are welcome to live where they belong, and to serve their purpose there. I just don't want them biting me. Therefore I would not try to kill them in the swamp. I would instead try to: keep them out of the guesthouse keep them away from guests if they do get inside the guesthouse keep them away from guests in the ...


4

I would suggest a combination of methods to control the mosquitoes. The Lethal ovitrap is one approach, but if we look at the mosquito life cycle, we see multiple points of attack. Adult breeding. Government and Aid Agencies breed and release huge numbers of sterile male mosquitoes to interrupt breeding in some parts of the world. I assume that such an ...


3

I personally use a combination of d-limonene & borax. First, borax is a natural occurring salt from lake beds and d-limonene is basically just orange oil, a solvent. Mix the two together and spray on nest. *****NOTE***** Because the d-limonene is a solvent, it will disolve plastics & rubber seals. Use a solvent safe sprayer. OR You can use ...


3

I am a grower of herbs and alpines. I use only bioinsecticide ie critters that control other critters. In the uk as far as I can tell there is only one product still in use as an insecticide from the group of chemicals known as neonicitinoids. It has very strict conditions of use one of which is that treated plants must not be planted in the ground for 9 ...


2

I lived in the tropics for a year. The three repellants that seem to work well are either: 1) Permetherin - a common insecticide and repellant. It's safe enough to use on your clothes and camping gear, but not directly on skin. It's also effective as a general insecticide around the house. 2) Citronella incense - very easy to get a hold of and it'll ...


2

The two methods I have used recently is: 1. smoke - I have worked with a cigar which helped keep mosquitoes away. I have also had a controlled burning with much smoke which will help very much depending on the environmental conditions. I was working down in a swampy area and the smoke dropped into the swamp bottom and helped much. 2. onion - I take one ...


2

I found what looks to be a fairly comprehensive (and easily printable!) list of products to avoid here: http://www.beyondpesticides.org/pollinators/documents/pesticide_list_final.pdf


2

Another way is to use a trap to get rid of them. I hate wasps and these devices work quite good and most importantly passively (i.e. you don't have to spray the wasps). It's also very easy to build one yourself if you want to try it out without spending money. The traps work by luring the wasps in with something they like (e.g. sweet soda). Due to the trap's ...


2

Audibon Magazine distilled the following from Bat Conservation International: Here are some tips for installing a bat house, from Bat Conservation International, a science-based bat conservation organization. Design. All bat houses should be at least 2 feet tall, have chambers at least 14 inches wide, and have a landing area extending below ...


2

It's common practice for professional growers to use pesticides when cultivating flower bulbs. Greenpeace investigated the use of pesticides in commercially sold flowering plants in Europe and found that: Only 2% of the samples contained no detectable residues. Insecticides regarded as of particular toxicological significance to bees were found frequently....


2

One method that I have found to be particularly good is using a soap with surfactants in a Hand Pump Garden Sprayer which can be found for under $20, for example here is one on Amazon that looks similar to the one I have. Fill the tank with some water and enough mild dishwashing soap such as Dawn to make a soapy feeling liquid between your fingers. I found ...


1

DE will kill most soft-bodied insects by causing them to become dehydrated due to miscroscopic cuts incurred from contact with the razor-sharp ancient fossil dust. Wasps definitely will die from DE exposure and contact. These cuts drain their fluids and dessicate their bodies. I have used it succesfully with ants as well as grasshoppers. Each requires a ...


1

I've found that, if you aren't apposed to something genetically engineered, the Mosquito Shoo Geranium has some use. It doesn't drive away mosquitoes, as advertised, but it does contain citronella, and when rubbed over bare skin it works well. Note: Those with a lot of allergies shouldn't try this, or perhaps on only a small area at first. Also, be aware ...


1

I think you are asking about plants planted in the bucket (?). Actually these plants need direct sunlight (but not too much) and fresh air, as well as water. You can put it in shade in a terrace. And while watering the plant, be careful that you are not giving too much water, which will spoil the health of that plant. And as much as possible, keep ...


1

I had tried Lemon juice spray on Ants and it worked well. I used un-fresh lemon and squeezed its juice into spray-can containing water and sprayed it on ants. On next days, ants weren't there!


1

There are several products on the market that use mint oil such as this one. While I haven't used the one linked, I have used ones sold at home depot branded as "safer" and they worked well. I sometimes had to do multiple applications over time, but in the long run, the ants subsided. In my case, I had sugar ants.


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