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12

If you're currently in Western Europe, then Eastern European countries may be very interesting for you to look at, because compared to Western Europe: The cost of living tends to be lower, so you could invest more of your savings into alternative technologies such as solar energy Cost of property tends to be lower (both housing and land) There's generally ...


6

The best list is probably wikipedia: Phase-out of fossil fuel vehicles There is a good review from the World Economic Forum here, dated 2017, which discusses some of the different approaches taken, which I've summarized here: UK: Ban production of petrol and diesel cars by 2040 (since changed to 2035); France: Ban sale of petrol and diesel cars by 2040; ...


6

I can only tell you about my country, Chile, where I've been watching the situation closely. But since I'm living in France now (for the moment), I'm also familiar with the situation in France and Spain. As things are in Chile right now, I believe that self-sufficiency is quite affordable. We can generate our own energy, our tax load is quite low (compared ...


4

In the U.S., building permits are generally administered and controlled by the county. Contact your local county planning office to get more information on what their requirements are for solar. If you are really lucky, you may even find you are eligible for a rebate of some sort for going "green."


4

You have to persuade people to do it and ensure the infrastructure is there. For the first, start an organisation of volunteers. Put up posters, organise lectures in schools, factories, social centres, do radio interviews... it takes time. Don't lose heart. For the second lobby your local and national politicians, make sure everybody has access to ...


3

Strawbale has established codes in many jurisdictions. Try the SB-R-US group on Yahoo groups for details. Note: 2 story bale is much dicier for standards. Notably: California has a bale code that is accepted in active earthquake zones. CMHC in Canada will loan money on bale houses, and has model codes I've not heard of an earth shelter building that ...


2

Science Daily is a good one. It discusses new scientific articles in a way that is understandable for non-scientists and it provides a link to the original article so you can read it yourself. The site has quite a bit of interesting subtopics. Just to name a few: sustainability recycling and waste pollution global warming alternative fuels solar energy ...


2

In the Netherlands gas boilers have been banned in new construction since 2018. In the UK and Austria gas boilers will be banned in new construction from 2025.


1

Almost certainly Aotearoa will phase in a ban from 2025. Currently a draft plan but likely to go ahead: https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/green-business/124127933/choosing-gas-for-new-homes-could-be-money-down-the-drain-says-consumer-nz


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In the United States Many cities in the U.S. state of California The Sierra Club has a list of 42 cities in California that have implemented some form of ban on natural gas in new construction. The list includes a brief snippet about the specifics of the rules, and links to the relevant legislation. They provide this chart showing the impact of these ...


1

Wales (in the UK) has a planning policy called "One planet development" which substantially relaxes planning restrictions for new dwellings which will "have an initial ecological footprint of 2.4 global hectares per person or less with a clear potential to move to 1.88 global hectares per person over time": http://lammas.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2013/03/...


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