Hot answers tagged

23

There are a number of questions there. "Can LED light provide same amount of energy as sunlight?" In total, no, at least with humanity's available resources. The sun is kinda big. Per unit area? Sure, if you use enough LEDs and focus them tightly enough. "Can humanity get rid of the sun" Probably not, within our currently available technology ;-) ...


17

TLDR; don't use them for lighting. Given that you could keep your incandescent bulbs for when your current energy-efficient (I will assume CCFL) bulbs need replacing, your choice boils down to: buy a new CCFL; or use an incandescent that has already been manufactured. This helpful analysis gives the embodied energy in a CCFL as 1.7 kWh. Let's assume that ...


13

i signed up just so i could make this comment. THelper♦ provided a good link to a DOE report on this topic, which i was researching because my roommate is skeptical about the advantages of efficient bulbs. the report THelper♦ cited has the following bar graph that pretty much answers the question:


11

I use them in garden/indoor. Something like this... (source : google search)


10

I think this is a great example of how sustainability really is multi-faceted. LED lighting may be great from an energy consumption standpoint, and not as good with respect to finite material usage. Energy Use vs Material Supply I think it's important, however, to apply some weighting to the different factors. I don't believe we're yet at a critical ...


9

I disagree with the answers that say not to use it. It may in fact be an excellent idea to use it if: you live somewhere that requires your home to be heated in the winter you currently heat with electricity or with something less efficient than electricity The "wasted" energy from an incandescent bulb is wasted as heat. In the summer, this is really bad ...


9

The answer you are looking for would be contained in a Life Cycle Assessment (LCA). For an LCA you first want to determine the boundaries that are important to your question. Are you considering cradle to grave (disposal)? Cradle to cradle (recycling after use)? What are the boundaries for recycled source materials if used to make the light bulbs? The ...


9

Sort of. Consider the pay back time. high efficiency lights are expensive. Expense is, at least in part, a measure of the resources used to make it.* Replacing the fixtures in the kitchen where the lights are on 8-10 hours a day is probably a good idea. Replacing the lights in the hall closet that runs 20 minutes a week is not. Example: Our kitchen has ...


8

I assume you are talking here about incandescent light bulbs. From looking around the Internet and from my personal experience, here is what I can say: In the countries I have lived in (France and Australia), I have always read that incandescent light bulbs should be thrown in the general waste bins. These kinds of specific recycling streams really depend ...


8

To answer your question about whether or not it's financially worthwhile to swap them out, I looked at two simlarly rated lamps from the same manufacturer: Philips 60W equivalent CFL: 14W power consumption, 800 Lumens, CRI 82 Philips 60W equivalent LED: 11W power consumption, 830 lumens, CRI 80 So there's a 3W difference in power consumption between the ...


7

The wattage given on the fixture refers to the maximum that can safely be used. That will be dictated by two things: The internal wiring of the fixture, and the heat that it can tolerate. In reality the additional 6W of the three 42W lamps that you are using is probably not going to be a problem, but it would be wrong of me to advise you that it's OK - you ...


7

I received a similar question on my own website a while back, and was surprised when I researched the answer. I thought it was mostly newer technology light bulbs that were recycled to avoid ewaste, etc, but my research indicated that some places will recycle incandescent bulbs as well. If you're in the United States and looking to put them in your curbside ...


7

The best analogy for this is the use of daylight savings time, where in effect people wake up one hour early than they usually do. A study by the US Department of Transport in 1975 (see page 4 of the website), showed that Daylight Saving Time trims the entire country's electricity usage by a small but significant amount, about one percent each day, ...


6

Please consider donating incandescent bulbs to a support group for diseases that can sensitize some people to light. One disease with fairly widespread support group chapters is Lupus. Lupus has various manifestations, but some individuals with it develop headaches, weakness, and/or rashes when exposed to direct sunlight or fluorescent lights, or even cool ...


6

Osram did a good comparative life cycle assessment on bulbs, including incandescent, CFLs, and LEDs. The total life cycle impacts of CFLs and LEDs are both significantly lesser in all categories than incandescent bulbs, meaning that the very best thing you can do with an incandescent bulb is not use it even if it's already been manufactured! They are ...


6

In my opinion, fixing rather than repurchasing is part of sustainability. Of course others believe otherwise, and that's okay. It depends upon the type of lamp, e.g., touch-to-light, mechanical switch, other. My guess is there is a problem with the lamp socket. The first thing I'd do is use my trusty voltage detector (VD) to verify there was voltage in the ...


6

The big advantage of GravityLight is that you can pull the weight once and then you have electricity for a relatively long period (I read somewhere it's 30 minutes). This is ideal when you need to have both hands free to do some work. This long period is also a must if you want it to replace the kerosene lamps that are currently used in rural Africa. The ...


5

There are now 60 watt equivalent LED candelabra bulbs available, which use only 7 watts. I bought 12 of them and they are working awesome. Feit PerformanceLED Chandelier / Candelabra Bulbs @ Earth LED


5

Both LED and flourescents can produce 'ideal' lighting conditions for plants. LED Lights are the most efficient measured in lumens per watt, and also in terms of material waste, since they last longer and are smaller. Their biggest current disadvantage is that they are significantly more expensive upfront. Depending on the model and how you figure the ...


4

There is a xenon (Xe 54) gas inside the bulb and this is inert. Does not harm anything in so tiny amount and it is environment friendly. Bigger xenon lamp should not be breached, because the pressure inside the lamp is different and this they could shatter/explode, but G8 does absolutely nothing, if that happen, but don't do it. To throw it away could be OK. ...


4

I would hold a few in reserve in case you ever find a need for them. For instance, I used an 85W incandescent bulb and a steel coffee can to create a small "space heater" for young chicks (chickens). The rest can probably be sold via Craigslist, eBay, or similar. There are still people unwilling to change to more efficient lighting, and those bulbs will at ...


4

What to do with existing stock of incandescent bulbs – use them up or just put an LED in any socket where a lamp burns out? As efficient LED bulbs are widely available the question comes up what is the most economical way to transition, if a household still has some “stock” of previously purchased incandescent bulbs. A white paper published by Forestfern....


4

Given the uncertainties in many of your numbers, your answer is consistent with Nate Storey's. Your assumption of 303 lm/W for LEDs doesn't look plausible to me - that's very different to the sort of efficiencies I see on the market. Half that would be much more plausible. So no, your total1 calculation doesn't look right to me. And you do need to account ...


4

I haven't had this problem either. I've never even heard of it. Of the lighting that I use regularly, almost all of it is CFL or (lately) LED. I have almost no incandescent bulbs left. I prefer the incandescent light in terms of colour, but not worth it to me for their greater power consumption. For warm light, find lights with lower Kelvin (K) numbers. ...


4

We've been using CFL bulbs for more than 15 years & LEDs for about 5, and have so far had great results with most. The few we've had difficulty with early demise were either: cheapies in challenging conditions (ie enclosed fixtures, dimming without changing to appropriate for LED dimmer switches), or bought from retailers where items are more likely to ...


3

Vertical Farming does already compete with horizontal farming. I read an article about a lettuce farm in Japan that was producing 10,000 head of lettuce a day. The research showed that the vertical farm not only used less water but it also produced more lettuce with less labour. Because LEDs have been designed specifically for this purpose by GE, the farm ...


3

There is a lot of efficiency variation that depends on the quality of the LEDs. Cheap LEDs are no better than CFLs. High quality LEDs from brands like Cree or Philips can be over double the efficiency of CFLs. Also under-powering LEDs will make them more efficient and last longer. They can last indefinitely when underpowered by a certain level.


2

Some of the steps or inputs may be missing for light bulbs in particular, but in general the U.S. Life cycle Inventory Database (http://www.nrel.gov/lci/) has this sort of data.


2

I'd been looking for a 60W equivalent candelabra base bulb for a while too. For the past few years the highest equivalent available to consumers was 40W. Now it looks like the 60's are finally making their way to market. This one claims 700 lumens which, if true, would be very close to the brightness of a 60W incandescent. http://www.wholesaleled.com/...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible