6

You seem to be well aware of the "cooking applications" of lard, but just in case you haven't heard of it, I'm particularly fond of Schmalz a German spread made from lard, together with small amounts of pork scratchings/cracklings, apples and onions. (For example, see here for a basic recipe.) As for candles, you can make about 12 candles from 2 pounds of (...


5

At the risk of suggesting something too obvious: contact the manufacturer. Hats off to Wendy from Moral Fibres for doing some research on this: http://moralfibres.co.uk/is-there-plastic-in-your-tea/


5

Mallets/Sacks I think you're going down the wrong track with the sack idea. I doubt any kind of fabric or material that could be used to make a sack would stand up to much hammering, and even if it did I would also expect that if your end goal is flour then using a mallet would not give a quality result. If you wanted rolled oats for porridge, you might ...


5

You can use it to replace oil when cooking things that would benefit from the pork flavour like soups. You can use it in any situation that requires deep frying. Chips taste especially nice when cooked in lard. It can be used as a wood preservative. It makes amazing pastries. If done properly and doesn't smell, you can add fabric dye and use it as shoe ...


4

Many mineral bases are in essence ground rock. You can find some of them in 50 pound bags at any shop that deals with brick mortar and concrete colorants. Ferrous oxide, and ferric oxide give you reds and pinks. (See Grand Canyon) Some of the metal oxides are very toxic. Lead oxide produces a lovely white. cadmium a school bus yellow. But Titanium ...


4

This isn't a complete answer but I would avoid buying PV panels built in countries with poor environmental regulations. That would be a good place to start. For example China. Then if possible avoid companies that mine the materials they're built from in places like China or Africa. Again, the regulations allow much more pollution than places like Europe ...


3

More uses... Lard or the fat can be made into Lardo - or cured pork fat (Italian name). This is done without rendering it. It's remarkably tasty. There are many versions of this around the world. Lard can be 'cleaned' to remove much of the pork flavor too, and then is usually for nearly everything. You can look this up, but is mostly a process of ...


2

It is also possible to use clay of different colors than the object you wish to paint (there is clay in many different colors: blackish, grey, yellow, red etc). You add water untill the clay becomes liquid and then simply paint it with a brush. I once painted a white vase with red clay like this ... unfortunately I don't have a picture of it.


2

What the best recycling policy is is a political question. As you mentioned in your question there are many aspects to this and all good recycling policies will address issues such as cost, environmental impact, human health impact, end-user awareness, convenience of using the system, compliance, amount of generated waste, worker safety and more. Which ...


2

In e.g. China, L-cysteine is produced from human hair (among other things) and used as a dough conditioner (bread 'improver') https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rKoi3P84OQU Or Google for l-cystine bread improver human hair


1

I have found it good to deter rabbits from eating shrubbery/gardens, sprinkled on the ground. You don't need much as it lasts a long time.


1

Wood is the best choice for furniture from an environmental perspective, and substituting wood where possible for other products would have a net environmental benefit. 2003 review of available studies A good starting point is a review produced by the Australian government in 2003 which looked at about a dozen different studies including life cycle ...


1

This is not an answer, but rather my attempt at a road map of what you need to know to answer your question. Much depends on externalities. Wood is an awfully cheap resource. You plant trees, and mostly ignore the land for 20 to 80 years depending on what you want. (Not quite true: It is usually worth your while to thin about 1/4 of the way through. ...


1

If you ship stuff from far away it increases the carbon footprint of whatever you buy. You could find some dark and light river stones in your local river, or find a beach and look for shells. Buying exotic material from far away places, regardless of how sustainable the material is not sustainable bc it creates a bigger carbon footprint to transport the ...


1

Milling by hand is very hard work, that's why most traditional mills are animal, wind or water powered. I have used a commercially made hand-powered grain mill, and it was very hard work. A cup of flour took a minute or more of fairly strenuous work (I cycle and use a power meter, so I'm guessing more than 150 Watts which is a lot of arm power - it's the ...


1

I disagree with Helios's answer. If you are going to rule out anything non-renewable in our lifetime, then we are constrained to a wood and plant society. Can't even chip flint arrowheads by that standard. I have trouble when a resource whose transport costs more than the material itself is called 'rare' and whose primary use is filtering beer, pool water,...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible