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Yes, being a vegetarian is more environmentally-friendly than otherwise This question has been asked and answered on Skeptics Stack Exchange, based on a claim by PETA to that point. Full details are in this answer. To summarise the summary: Production of meat is a major source of anthropogenic greenhouse gases. A vegetarian diet therefore leads to less ...


10

There are two relevant disadvantages to beef: Cattle produce a lot of methane, which is a greenhouse gas. The amount of land (and energy, and fertiliser) needed to grow enough grass to feed enough cattle to provide enough beef to feed a human is many times more than that required to grow crops to feed the human directly. This is generally true for eating ...


6

Would levying taxes on non-organic meat be an effective means to reduce consumption and thus reduce the environmental harm? Yes. But. It would add complexity compared to just taxing all meat, and thus make the tax less efficient. The increased costs would be the primary cause of reduced consumption. Whether only taxing conventional meat would have a ...


6

It's not an all-or-nothing scenario. It depends on how beef is raised. Poorly fed (e.g., corn fed) cattle and cattle on an open range will have negative effects on greenhouse gas levels and land quality. In contrast, managed grazing of cattle can have a positive effect in both regards. Here is a starter link for more info on why beef production can help ...


5

Methane emissions from livestock make up about 50% of the greenhouse gases (weighted by severity of the impact that each type of greenhouse gas makes) from New Zealand, so it's a big problem. For those interested, it seems it's mainly burped out of cows. The link in the previous sentence also discussed measurement technology so that a better understanding ...


5

Here in The Netherlands we have the 'Viswijzer' (link is to Dutch version only). It is an index where you can lookup which types of fish you can buy just fine and which types you should not buy because they are endangered and/or not caught sustainably. I'm not sure about the exact criteria they have but according to this index: CERTIFIED/GREEN (ok): ...


5

I grew up very poor, out in the country, the youngest of seven, and my mom was a widow. She canned everything over an open fire outside, in a galvanized tub, the same one we used to take our baths in. She had a piece of plywood cut to fit the top, and a "handle" of plywood nailed to the center. Three or four cinderblocks under the edges of the tub, and a ...


4

The above answers are correct for 'traditional' composting but by using bokashi composting you can compost all of your food scraps, including meat, bones, cooked food, dairy etc. The bokashi process works by first pickling or fermenting your food scraps using healthy bacteria. Once the fermentation process is complete (after about 2 weeks) the pre-compost (...


4

When I visited Peru, EVERY house had a guinea pig pen in the back yard. Peru doesn't prep food like north Americans do, so there was a lot of husks, stems, trimmings, peelings. These went to the guinea pigs. They were either used by the household, or sold to street vendors who would sell barbecued GP on the street. In 1969 you could get one for about 20 ...


3

I received the following answer after emailing a company that raises crickets. We use a agricultural feed that includes feed beans, buckwheat, and feed corn non of which are edible by humans. We don't use any pre- or post-consumer waste to feed the crickets for two reasons: we can't control the consistency of taste with a non-regular feed stock and our ...


3

There are a few factors to consider which would change the results, such as: Animal welfare issues What sort of animals you're eating What you feed the animals on How much of the animal you're prepared to eat For example ruminants such as sheep/cattle tend to have more of an impact on global warming due to higher methane emissions. However they may also be ...


3

Get a pig. Or some chickens. You still need to follow some hygiene rules before feeding them meat scraps, check your local agri/health advisory office.


3

You must read The Vegetarian Myth by Lierre Kieth: http://www.bookdepository.com/Vegetarian-Myth-Lierre-Keith/9781604860801 It's an excellent book, well cited and rich in information, presenting a factual viewpoint that my vegetarian-of-17-years self had to stand up and take notice of. Such a complicated topic, this book really opened my eyes. Needless to ...


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You could either make your own or buy pre-made beeswax cloth. It behaves like plastic wrap and can be washed with cold water and soap. Here is a link on how to make your own.


2

Please eat tuna only from the cans with MSC (Marine Stewardship Council) label, avoid pizzas or sandwiches that cannot provide such certification. (See the approved answer of @THelper (and the comments) for more details, this is the short answer!)


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Are you on a biodynamic septic system? Flush them. The bacteria should chew them up happily.


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The most sustainable way is reuse. Perhaps you can eat the leftovers later, or use it as ingredients for soup. As others have also suggested here, you can feed leftovers to animals if you have them (like a dog, chickens or pigs). But be warned that local regulations may not allow this! For example in the EU you are not allowed to feed kitchen scraps from an ...


2

Both of Tim's points (re: negative population growth and elastic demand) are important points, but I don't think they're doing a good job of answering your question. Unlike people living in the 1980s, a lot of people today expect marginal changes in their carbon footprint to have marginal global effects within their own lifetimes. Therefore, a plan of not ...


2

The simplest answer I could find comes from this 2019 New York Times interactive about food and climate change. Based on a serving with 50 grams of protein, the average greenhouse gas impact of beef is 17.7 kg CO2 and the average impact of cheese is 5.4 kg CO2. So to conclude: beef is worse than cheese for global warming. But be careful to note their caveats:...


1

Mass producers of the grain consumed in feedlots proudly assert that they are feeding the world, as if they want a medal for their efforts. This is an obvious consequence of cognitive dissonance. They have doubts about their own activities, but if you ask them what they fear about the future based on what they know, you will see "environmental impacts" in a ...


1

Someone has to suggest the obvious answer... for the record. Q: "is there an entirely different solution?" A: Don't have children. Earth's problem isn't solely and exclusively with what its Human inhabitants are doing... how many are doing it is the main problem. No matter how carnivorous and voracious a single Human is (or could be), their consumption ...


1

Google is your friend, a cursory search for "ethical butcher UK" came up with some good results. You want a local butcher, who you can develop a relationship and trust with. There are some great books out there as well, on the question of buying meat. The vegetarians are right that eating lower on the foodchain can reduce your carbon footprint, but farming ...


1

In general crickets are not that selective about their food, they take wet and dry food, could even be fed waste food. Dry food examples: compressed pellets from chicks, fish food, oat flakes, flakes made from vegetables, dry food for cats and dogs, wheat bran. Wet food examples: fruits, salads, dandelion, carrots, herbs. If animal-based food wastes are ...


1

provide them with brush piles and only release them into a free range area when you have alot like at least 20-100. and keep a few backups in a pen. we had a guinea pig live to almost 9 years living in our yard with dogs snakes skunks and hawks it will work fine. i was in texas with one acre.


1

In north america we have Seachoice.org. They make a handy pocket guide. Yellowfin tuna is on the red (bad) list. But they say canned Albacore is ok. http://www.seachoice.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/SC_card_2012_5panel_web.pdf


1

The problem with packaging starts in the grocery store where styrofoam trays are used for all meat.How about using containers like milk cartons which are wax coated. Can cardboard be coated with wax and used or is this also not biodegradable? I'm just posing some possible alternatives and looking for answers from anyone out there.


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I don’t eat meat but anything I need to freeze, I normally slice it up and keep it in reused glass jars and freeze it . It works perfectly and you end up reusing old glass jars. Although i believe that if you truly worried about sustainability the best think to do is stop contributing to meat and dairy industry .


1

there is the possibility for hot composting. I read if you use the Johanna Green bin that you can put everything in this bin. Temperature get so high that it decomposes everything.


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