Hot answers tagged

61

I include all organic materials in my compost, including meat, bones, dairy, grains, oils, and citrus - all of which are often listed as inappropriate for compost. Meat attracts pests such as dogs, mice, and flies. After adding new material to my compost pile, I put a thick layer of straw on top, and then a scrap of metal mesh fencing on top of that. This ...


32

As I see it, there are 5 options: as detailed below, canning is an option; in @Nis' answer, salting, smoking, and drying are options. The fifth, and possibly the best option, is: Store it "on the hoof" That is to say that if you want to "store" pork for several months, perhaps you should wait until the beginning of winter for slaughter and processing. Or ...


25

Anything that has been living can be composted. Local compost manufacturers in Finland suggest strongly that meat can be composted. As I understand the problem with meat has something to do with attracting anaerobic processes and overheating the compostor slowing the process down. Make sure your compostor gets enough air and the contents are not too tightly ...


23

I would probably go with either: Salting Smoking Drying Or a combination of those three. Salting has been done for quite a while here in Scandinavia, but mostly with fish. Herring to be precise.


21

The main/most convincing reason I have heard not to compost meat (as well as dog or cat manure) is due to the possibility that it may harbor pathogens harmful to humans or other animals. There are steps that can be taken to reduce this risk--mainly high-temperature composting. Although it can be difficult or impossible to achieve the necessary temperatures ...


16

From http://www.treehugger.com/green-food/meat-eaters-guide-get-to-know-the-carbon-footprint-of-your-diet-lamb-beef-cheese-are-the-worst.html we have which I find pretty fascinating — certainly I would have put pork much closer to beef than either salmon or Turkey... really interesting stuff. I'd like to see as well the same graph but per calorie rather ...


14

You can compost meat, but the problem is that it will start to smell and attract flies and maggots (as well as neighbourhoods cats and dogs possibly). It also slows down the composting process. You can use a bokashi bin to preprocess all left-overs including meat, fish and dairy. It doesn't smell and after about 2 weeks the bin contents can be mixed with ...


11

Yes, being a vegetarian is more environmentally-friendly than otherwise This question has been asked and answered on Skeptics Stack Exchange, based on a claim by PETA to that point. Full details are in this answer. To summarise the summary: Production of meat is a major source of anthropogenic greenhouse gases. A vegetarian diet therefore leads to less ...


11

Although @Nis already gave an answer, I want to expand on it a little. What does it mean to preserve food? One would be to put the meat into an environment, where bugs, moulds, etc. don't exist (i.e. can't survive). The common way of doing that is to put your food in the freezer, although I have also seen people preserve grain in barrels filled with ...


10

Some concerns I would have about putting meat in the composter: Attracting rodents, dogs, and cats Things like bones aren't going to compost well (whether very heavily boiled chicken bones might compost is another matter entirely) Meat is going to be very high in nitrogen and consequently may pose problems unless you mix in low-nitrogen/high-carbon mixtures ...


10

There are two relevant disadvantages to beef: Cattle produce a lot of methane, which is a greenhouse gas. The amount of land (and energy, and fertiliser) needed to grow enough grass to feed enough cattle to provide enough beef to feed a human is many times more than that required to grow crops to feed the human directly. This is generally true for eating ...


8

One of the overlooked means of storing meat is fermentation. This is a bit of an art form so I will leave a few pointers here, but it is important to use salt and to ferment in a proper environment (sometimes starter cultures are added). You may not know this but salami is basically raw meat (beef and pork) which has been salted, fermented, and dried. It'...


7

In a case like yours you're probably better off composting the things you generate that you fed to the hogs and buying the meat from a good responsible local farmer. Even better buy from a CSA. Since you weren't generating enough food for the hogs on site, you may want to consider a smaller animal(s) that eat most of the same waste. A dwarf/pygmy/mini hog ...


7

Although I think the other answers do provide good information, I would argue that, as posed on sustainability.stackexchange.com, all of them are still wrong (albeit maybe Chris Travers' answer is only partially so). You should not put meat in your compost pile. Sustainability of Eating Meat in the First Place If you're even remotely concerned with ...


6

I've been told to not put meat in compost heaps because it would attract rats. I've only seen one rat in the 15 years I've been living here, and that rat was nowhere near the compost heap. So it must be working ;)


6

It depends on how you define "sustainable" and what your goals are. If your intention is to provide meat for yourself and your family independent of community or industry, in other words "self-sustainability" then raising livestock yourself makes sense but you need to be prepared to provide feed for your animals independently as well as enough room to keep ...


6

It's not an all-or-nothing scenario. It depends on how beef is raised. Poorly fed (e.g., corn fed) cattle and cattle on an open range will have negative effects on greenhouse gas levels and land quality. In contrast, managed grazing of cattle can have a positive effect in both regards. Here is a starter link for more info on why beef production can help ...


6

Would levying taxes on non-organic meat be an effective means to reduce consumption and thus reduce the environmental harm? Yes. But. It would add complexity compared to just taxing all meat, and thus make the tax less efficient. The increased costs would be the primary cause of reduced consumption. Whether only taxing conventional meat would have a ...


5

Here in The Netherlands we have the 'Viswijzer' (link is to Dutch version only). It is an index where you can lookup which types of fish you can buy just fine and which types you should not buy because they are endangered and/or not caught sustainably. I'm not sure about the exact criteria they have but according to this index: CERTIFIED/GREEN (ok): ...


5

Methane emissions from livestock make up about 50% of the greenhouse gases (weighted by severity of the impact that each type of greenhouse gas makes) from New Zealand, so it's a big problem. For those interested, it seems it's mainly burped out of cows. The link in the previous sentence also discussed measurement technology so that a better understanding ...


4

The above answers are correct for 'traditional' composting but by using bokashi composting you can compost all of your food scraps, including meat, bones, cooked food, dairy etc. The bokashi process works by first pickling or fermenting your food scraps using healthy bacteria. Once the fermentation process is complete (after about 2 weeks) the pre-compost (...


3

I grew up very poor, out in the country, the youngest of seven, and my mom was a widow. She canned everything over an open fire outside, in a galvanized tub, the same one we used to take our baths in. She had a piece of plywood cut to fit the top, and a "handle" of plywood nailed to the center. Three or four cinderblocks under the edges of the tub, and a ...


3

I often use a vacuum sealer to seal up food, including meat. I don't know how the freezer shelf life compares to the other answers, but anecdotally I can attest that I've never encountered problems using the stored food several weeks later. I buy vacuum sealed bags that I can reuse (albeit sometimes I have to cut off a small amount of the plastic to open ...


3

Whole chickens I would expect to be a bit of a freezer burn problem with or without ziplock bags. Freezer burn occurs with air contact and I don't see how to deal with this problem without (or, post-cleaning, even with!) a vacuum sealing machine and I suspect ziplock bags may be superior sustainability-wise in the sense that there is at least a chance of ...


3

You must read The Vegetarian Myth by Lierre Kieth: http://www.bookdepository.com/Vegetarian-Myth-Lierre-Keith/9781604860801 It's an excellent book, well cited and rich in information, presenting a factual viewpoint that my vegetarian-of-17-years self had to stand up and take notice of. Such a complicated topic, this book really opened my eyes. Needless to ...


3

In this TED talk Marcel Dicke mentions that from 10kg of feed you will get: 1kg of beef or, 3kg of pork or, 5kg of chicken or, 9kg of locusts I believe that he talks about locusts emitting less greenhouse gases as well. You can see the chart at about 9:30 into the talk. The whole talk is quite good.


3

When I visited Peru, EVERY house had a guinea pig pen in the back yard. Peru doesn't prep food like north Americans do, so there was a lot of husks, stems, trimmings, peelings. These went to the guinea pigs. They were either used by the household, or sold to street vendors who would sell barbecued GP on the street. In 1969 you could get one for about 20 ...


3

There are a few factors to consider which would change the results, such as: Animal welfare issues What sort of animals you're eating What you feed the animals on How much of the animal you're prepared to eat For example ruminants such as sheep/cattle tend to have more of an impact on global warming due to higher methane emissions. However they may also be ...


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