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Geologically and by origin, yes, they are linked. Politically they've started to split. Its use is much less detrimental environmentally than oil or coal - it burns clean and is nontoxic. And it was termed an important “transition fuel” by President Obama as part of his administration’s clean energy goals. Gas companies glommed onto to that by marketing it ...


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Simpler answer: In the context of the question, gas and oil are two names for the same thing, hydrocarbons. Whether a hydrocarbon is a gas or liquid depends on the temperature. Methane "natural gas" ( one carbon atom) is a liquid below -259 F. Ethane ( 2 carbons) liquid below -127 F. Propane (3 carbons) liquid below - 44 F. Butane ( 4 carbons) liquid below ...


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They are inherently linked. Every oil well produces some gas. A few gas wells produce only methane and ethane but a majority also produce some propane, butane, and heavier hydrocarbons. It depends on whose definition you are using as to when LPG ( liquid petroleum gas) becomes an oil component. And oil wells normally produce more gas and less oil as they age ...


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tl;dr: Oil wells produce some natural gas, and natural gas wells produce some oil, but natural gas wells tend to be more "specialized," meaning that as their quantity and productivity increases, the linkage between these two fuels diminishes. This answer looks mainly at oil and gas production in the US (since that's what I'm more familiar with, and the U.S. ...


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