Hot answers tagged

7

This only addresses part of your question, but this question could be answered with a whole book. Homebrewing Biodiesel I do want to clarify that biodiesel is not only a potential "industrial" reuse for used cooking oils. Used cooking oil can be processed into biodiesel by a modestly savvy do-it-yourselfer at home, with a simple processor that you ...


5

I question the blanket assertion of 1 liter of oil contaminating 1 million liters of water. That's 1 part per million. This article: https://www.who.int/water_sanitation_health/water-quality/guidelines/chemicals/petroleumproducts_2add_june2008.pdf?ua=1 talks in detail about certain volatile fractions of various petrochemicals. Some of these have ...


5

There are two issues with used motor oil. One is that PCAH forms Thats Poly cyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Benzene like rings with odds and ends attached. Many are biologically active, some are carcinogenic. If burned at high temp, with sufficient oxygen, they aren't a problem. Incompletely burned they are serious problems. The second issue are the very ...


5

Commercial/ Factory designs have been replacing the power transmission of "lubricated chains" and "gear mechanisms" with high performance "Timing Belts" made of special polymer composited with steel fibre etc. One of our family was extensively involved in such redesigns/ solutions in all possible industries beyond automotive that you can think of (hydro ...


5

It doesn't. Assuming you're referring to wind capacity additions, it most closely tracks the political winds in the U.S., in the form of the Production Tax Credit (PTC), a federal incentive program for construction of new wind capacity. The U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Vision report makes this relationship clear: This chart ends at 2013 when the ...


4

I did some digging and found data with a bit more resolution. First, polysilicon prices since 2010: Source: Fu, et al, Economic Measurements of Polysilicon for the Photovoltaic Industry: Market Competition and Manufacturing Competitiveness. Then, crude oil prices since 2010: Source: www.macrotrends.net, Crude Oil Prices - 70 Year Historical Chart. Note ...


4

No. As the graphs provided show, the prices both spike during the GFC, loosely speaking, but the oil price spikes later and declines faster, then continues a general slow rise while the price of silicon falls. Note that in late 2005/early 2006 oil drops abruptly while silicon is rising sharply, but during the 2011 blip in silicon prices you see a similar ...


4

Here's a quick answer; hopefully we'll see some more in depth answers too. Looking at the given charts closely, the price of polysilicon appears to decline from around $75 in early 2010 to $17 in 2014, but the price of oil appears to gradually rise from $80 to $100 over the same period. This is very different behaviour, and says to me the relationship ...


4

You can compost the oil / grease if you have the room. It's just not as easy to do as most kitchen waste. Oil tends to make your compost pile anaerobic, so its gets smelly and can attract vermin. But if you have the space for a second (or more) composter / compost pile, and can control the vermin, it will work. Since the pile will likely be anaerobic, just ...


4

tl;dr: Oil wells produce some natural gas, and natural gas wells produce some oil, but natural gas wells tend to be more "specialized," meaning that as their quantity and productivity increases, the linkage between these two fuels diminishes. This answer looks mainly at oil and gas production in the US (since that's what I'm more familiar with, and the U.S. ...


3

Biogas This is not for DIY (as far as I know), but I know that it can be turned into biogas through fermentation. In my city (Zurich, Switzerland) food scraps are collected and they specifically request for fats and cooking oil (also liquid ones soaked up by a paper towel). Of course it's up to debate how sustainable that is.


3

While you have dismissed it in your question, I'd say that the best way to dispose of old oil is to convert it to Bio-Diesel and burn it - that reduces the amount of conventional Diesel that is dug from the ground, or made from virgin plant oil (which has the associated issues of using fertile ground for fuel instead of food). Oil-fuelled vehicles are going ...


3

TL, DR Solar thermal with a gas burner for peak demand. Possibly improved isolation. First, you need exact data on how much heat you need, and when, during the year and during each day. This should help you get an idea if the insulation of your house can be improved. Once you have the numbers, ask here for a first orientation. Without seeing the house (...


3

The problem is not the pipeline itself. Large pipelines are standard engineering. The disruption is fairly short term. The problem is that it would make a ready market for Canadian Oilsand oil to get to the gulf coast refineries. This drops the price of oil on a long range basis. (The Athabasca tar sands have more oil in them than ALL of the known ...


2

I'm going to be politically incorrect and say yes. "The solution to pollution is dilutions" Toxicity is in the dose. The amount of heavy metals and PAH's (Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) is significant. This is likely causing the anti-termite effect. A 1980 paper reports lead content of around 7500 ppm Zinc at 1500 ppm. (Note that zinc is a ...


2

Firstly: Reuse of the oil for food use isn't a good one. Oil goes rancid. This is why you change the oil in the fryer. Alternataive uses: Here most restaurants have a grease and oil bin in back. It's collected to make soap. No reason you can't make your own soap. I use solid fat to make bird food blocks. The school I get it from changes the grease ...


2

You could definitely switch to an efficient gas boiler system with proper controls to run "cleaner" and more efficiently. Depending on gas/oil prices in your area, this may or may not be economically beneficial (short or long term). Varying with your current setup, electrical prices in your area (and their generation method) you could also change about ...


2

In your question you assume that it is then processed into biodiesel. This is not always the case, for example it can be converted in lubricating oil and glycerol to make soap. In the abstract of the paper Applications of Waste Cooking Oil Other Than Biodiesel: A Review many examples of applications apart from biodiesels are listed. It can be processed to ...


2

This is quite a difficult question to answer with precision, because the impacts of mining depend a lot on how you do it. I can offer a few references which give a guide to the scale of the problem. There are many environmental concerns around the impact of Lithium mines on the environment and local communities (e.g. Reuters article on Salar de Atacama). ...


1

Your best bet to offset is not via some carbon-offset program that are a big con, but rather by directing your money into green investments. Invest in wind power, solar power, geothermal heat pump etc stocks. And when you have enough money invested in these stocks that you could purchase a geothermal heat pump system, you can decide whether the biggest ...


1

Hmm. Going after your intent, I'm going to lump all fossil fuel into this, and include coal and natural gas too. I'm going to also assume that while the chemical engineers can turn almost any organic into any other organic for a price, we will consider that you really mean, "without breaking the bank" Asphalt. Used in huge quantities, and the ...


1

How do the impacts of mining lithium for one electric vehicle (EV) for it's lifetime compare to the impacts of extracting oil for one internal combustion engine vehicle (ICEV) for it's lifetime? There's one fundamental difference in the comparison that cannot be ignored. It is the impact of lithium recycling. Lithium as an atom cannot vanish so recycling is ...


1

Geologically and by origin, yes, they are linked. Politically they've started to split. Its use is much less detrimental environmentally than oil or coal - it burns clean and is nontoxic. And it was termed an important “transition fuel” by President Obama as part of his administration’s clean energy goals. Gas companies glommed onto to that by marketing it ...


1

Simpler answer: In the context of the question, gas and oil are two names for the same thing, hydrocarbons. Whether a hydrocarbon is a gas or liquid depends on the temperature. Methane "natural gas" ( one carbon atom) is a liquid below -259 F. Ethane ( 2 carbons) liquid below -127 F. Propane (3 carbons) liquid below - 44 F. Butane ( 4 carbons) liquid below ...


1

They are inherently linked. Every oil well produces some gas. A few gas wells produce only methane and ethane but a majority also produce some propane, butane, and heavier hydrocarbons. It depends on whose definition you are using as to when LPG ( liquid petroleum gas) becomes an oil component. And oil wells normally produce more gas and less oil as they age ...


1

A: Reexamine your life style. How are you producing this fat? Can you produce less? Looking at our life, we probably produce about 4-5 tin cans of fat a year. When the can is full, it goes in the food garbage if it didn't get sidetracked to the dog dishes. (We have 3 garbage streams -- anything with food; recyclables -- paper, plastic, metal all meeting ...


1

If you have it available switching to natural gas will produce less CO2. If you have renewable energy surpluses, then TES (Thermal Energy Storage) makes lots of sense. You use MUCH larger water tanks, and heat it electrically when there is a surplus of power. Your air systems can be heated with hot-water fan coils -- cheap conversion. Look at roof ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible