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13

The logo means that the packaging consists of both PET and PE. Logos like this are common on packaging and are often (incorrectly) called 'recycling logos' or 'recycling codes'. Contrary to popular belief the presence of such a logo does not mean that the material is recyclable. Compostable plastic for example has code #7 and is not recyclable. Also, whether ...


10

There is a difference between reuse and recycling. Reuse is using a container again without major modifications. Recycling is transforming a container into its core elements and using that to make an entirely new object. AFAIK industrial reuse of plastic food packaging isn't done anywhere because of the risk of bacterial contamination. Many plastics are ...


9

​​Yes, blister packs are recyclable (for example with machines like this one) but chances are there's no recycling company in your area that will accept and recycle it unless you are able to separate the different materials yourself. Blister packs like the one you posted typically consist of plastic (usually PET or PVC) and aluminium. The problem with ...


8

Bags of cat food are better than recyclable! They are reusable! You know all of those trash bags that you buy? Well, save your empty cat food bags (roll them up tight and find a place to hide them), as they make great trash bags. To seal them up after they are full just fold the top over and use 3-5 staples to secure the fold. Not only do you reuse the ...


6

Depends a lot on where you live, but if you have the possibility to refill your own glass bottle, then I would call that the most sustainable option. In this part of Europe (Hungary/Romania) there are machines like this one, locals call them "iron cows". The milk comes from local farmers, but it is collected and tested by a company. The price of a liter is ...


5

If a store offers a publicly accessible rubbish bin, then it would be ethical to ask the store for permission to discretely transfer their product to your own containers inside or near the store and discard the packaging in their bin. In some cases it's already normal to discard packaging near or in the store, such as in a food court or mall. Your suggested ...


5

Apparently Nova Foods is an Italian company and apparently in Italy there are different logos for marking packaging as recyclable: I can't be sure, but I'm guessing that the symbol on your bag is a custom symbol probably indicating that the bag consists of PET and PE. Apparently this type of combination is called a PET/PE alloy. ptonline.com ...


4

Simon W is overall correct. While when the size gets large enough the walls have to be thicker because of the weight involved, for small products, the problem is that they have to be strong enough for the handling machinery. However there is an easy way to test this: Weigh them. Empty of course. For each container wash it and weigh it. Don't forget the ...


4

Almost certainly the 200g containers. Imagine a cube of yoghurt (ugh!). Think about the amount of material that will required to fully encompass that cube. That is the 1kg container. Now imagine that that cube is partitioned into five parts, and think about the amount of additional material required to accomplish this. That is 5x 200g containers. The only ...


4

There are blister packs which appear to be made entirely from aluminium and I put these in the recycle bin in their entirety. I have also been recycling the blister packs made from plastic and aluminium. I do this by occasionally separating the aluminium from the plastic in a sort of game of 'patients' by trying to separate as much of the aluminium from the ...


4

The City of Vancouver’s Waste Wizard says put them in the green bin. They also have a hotline you can call. Why wait for an answer here?


4

As with most candy wrappers, it's a combination of plastic and aluminium also known as metallised plastic or metallised film. The material is hard to recycle because it's difficult to separate the two materials. There are a few recyclers that accept this material (e.g.TerraCycle in the US and the UK or the Recycle program in Australia) but not many do. It's ...


4

It's all a matter of how you do the counting! If you take into account how much diversity you destroy, non-organic food is worse than "too much" cardboard packaging. But how do you count this? Life has no price, and damages are potentialities. On the other hand, the more you use "non-organic" method for farming, the more you need them. So it's even worse on ...


3

I've experimented with soaking foil-backed blister packs in caustic soda solution, commonly sold as a material to unclog drains. Caustic soda (sodium hydroxide, NaOH) dissolves the aluminium foil. The caustic soda solution can burn skin, so it needs care in using it. The dissolved aluminium produces sodium aluminate solution which can be flushed away with ...


3

Depends the type of cheese (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Types_of_cheese). Hard (type gouda) to half-hard half-soft (type monastery cheese) cheeses have a more or less hard crust (rind?). There is no more packaging needed if sold in one piece (unless maybe the rind is edible and should be wrapped for keeping it clean). Slices of hard/semi-hard cheese: let ...


3

Only thermo plastics have a recycle value, thermoset plastics do not. Even the thermo plastics are limited as recyclate - grade 1 recyclate, by grade 2 the polymers strands will no longer bond and the resultant product will develop weaknesses and start to split. As stated in the first answer, 'Yes... ...need to separate the different materials' it is this ...


3

NO! Tea tree oil is toxic when swallowed, so I'd strongly advise against any intake of tea tree oil, and even more so if you are using it regularly. Even if you spit it out, some may be left behind and adverse effects may build up over time. Also, be very careful when taking medical advice from people on the Internet. Imagine if instead of the above I told ...


3

Currently, tin or aluminum cans are easier and more environmentally recycled than Tetra Paks. That said, Tetra Pak is working hard to improve their product. One issue is that they mixed many materials in the Tetra Pak, while a tin can have a relatively simple recycling process. Metals have also been recycled for a longer amount of time, so there are more ...


3

You can make them yourself fairly easily by buying full sheets of seaweed in bulk at an Asian grocery store (some regular chain grocery stores carry them too). The big packs of seaweed do still contain plastic, but it’s less than in a single-serving container. “Roasted seaweed snack recipe” will get you lots of google hits. Here is one link: https://www....


3

You (probably) cannot do it on demand side. The reason this is impossible is that 99% of aluminum users don't care if their aluminum comes from recycled sources. Let's say there's need for 100 units of aluminum, out of which 50 units are new, and 50 units are recycled. Now, you introduce one unit of aluminum consumption, with the requirement that it comes ...


3

You can advocate for a carbon tax. When fossil fuel energy costs more, recycling is more economically valuable. Cheap power means easier to mine new aluminum. We really need a carbon tax for many reasons. They used to make a zillion tons of aluminum in the United States Pacific Northwest with dirt-cheap hydro power. But when electricity got expensive in ...


3

You forgot about a fourth option: The tube. Originally it looked like this: It was a bit flimsy and is easier punctured than the TetraPaks, so it isn't produced anymore (at least not in Germany, at least not widely). Still, over the past years it got a redesign. Now it can stand up on its own, is a bit more resilient to puncturing and it also comes in a ...


2

Packaging Considerations In your example of using bottles to contain a liquid being transported. All containers have a certain amount of required and excess material to enable them to hold a desired quantity of liquid. In the case of the bottles this material is in the thickness of the bottle, both the walls and the base. The large the container the ...


2

More reasons: The plastic makes it possible to see the bread. Shelf appeal. The paper allows them to be bagged warm. This gives a fresh bread smell around the shelf, and it feels warm in the customer's hand. Bag only: People have took in the bag to see it. Plastic only: Bread can't be bagged warm. A third option is to put naked loaves on display, and ...


2

You could either make your own or buy pre-made beeswax cloth. It behaves like plastic wrap and can be washed with cold water and soap. Here is a link on how to make your own.


2

For many things, just don't use a bag. I watched a man struggling to get a bunch of bananas into a plastic bag at the supermarket yesterday. There was no reason for it: the peels protect the bananas and they are collected into a bunch already. If I buy two or three of something, I don't need to put them in a bag. The cashier can put your three tomatoes on ...


2

This is not ethical. From an economic ethics point of view, you are throwing away your own trash (which you bought and thus acquired a responsibility for) in someone else's dumpster. This basically amounts to stealing, since someone else is paying to have that trash disposed of. From an environmental ethics point of view, you are not reducing the amount ...


2

I don't think so and I do not think it would be an effective statement. The store will likely have practical reasons for packaging and could not change their ways even if they wanted to. And they would probably be happy to dispose of your trash for you as long as you buy from them. But ethically, I would say once you buy it, it is your responsibility. For ...


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