13

If you are able to, you could discontinue the use of deodorant. I haven't used any in years and don't miss it a bit. However, I know that isn't for everyone. My boyfriend swears by using baking soda mixed with cornstarch (and I can vouch that it really works). This great article on My Plastic-Free Life looks at a bunch of home made deodorants. The ...


12

The logo means that the packaging consists of both PET and PE. Logos like this are common on packaging and are often (incorrectly) called 'recycling logos' or 'recycling codes'. Contrary to popular belief the presence of such a logo does not mean that the material is recyclable. Compostable plastic for example has code #7 and is not recyclable. Also, whether ...


10

There is a difference between reuse and recycling. Reuse is using a container again without major modifications. Recycling is transforming a container into its core elements and using that to make an entirely new object. AFAIK industrial reuse of plastic food packaging isn't done anywhere because of the risk of bacterial contamination. Many plastics are ...


9

​​Yes, blister packs are recyclable (for example with machines like this one) but chances are there's no recycling company in your area that will accept and recycle it unless you are able to separate the different materials yourself. Blister packs like the one you posted typically consist of plastic (usually PET or PVC) and aluminium. The problem with ...


7

Bags of cat food are better than recyclable! They are reusable! You know all of those trash bags that you buy? Well, save your empty cat food bags (roll them up tight and find a place to hide them), as they make great trash bags. To seal them up after they are full just fold the top over and use 3-5 staples to secure the fold. Not only do you reuse the ...


6

Some stores (for example the co-op in Northfield, MN) allow you to bring your own reusable plastic or glass containers, but you need to weigh your containers before you fill them. The co-op in Bozeman, MT provides clean glass jars for bulk liquids, and when you have finished with them you can bring them back to the store to be cleaned and set out for other ...


6

Does anyone use wood wool anymore? It's all peanuts and bubbles now a days. Wood wool depends on pulling long shavings with the grain. If you cut across the grain, the strand will break on a growth ring. With scraps, I think it would be hard to maintain the orientation of the scrap to the strand knives. Successive layers of wood have grain at right ...


5

For produce, you can make or buy mesh bags for use just as you reuse the grocery bags. We made some but I would think that bags made to hang items for drying (e.g. while camping) would work well. For powders you could use glass jars if your grocery has scales that can be tared. You could also use a stronger storage bag like Ziploc that is more likely to ...


5

In New Zealand, deep fried fish and chips are a very popular takeaway food, and an icon of NZ culture. The normal way to package them is in a single sheet of blank newsprint paper with newspaper wrapped around the outside for extra strength and insulation. The paper also helps excess moisture to breathe (often helped by a few holes punched through the ...


5

Apparently Nova Foods is an Italian company and apparently in Italy there are different logos for marking packaging as recyclable: I can't be sure, but I'm guessing that the symbol on your bag is a custom symbol probably indicating that the bag consists of PET and PE. Apparently this type of combination is called a PET/PE alloy. ptonline.com ...


5

If a store offers a publicly accessible rubbish bin, then it would be ethical to ask the store for permission to discretely transfer their product to your own containers inside or near the store and discard the packaging in their bin. In some cases it's already normal to discard packaging near or in the store, such as in a food court or mall. Your suggested ...


4

It's all a matter of how you do the counting! If you take into account how much diversity you destroy, non-organic food is worse than "too much" cardboard packaging. But how do you count this? Life has no price, and damages are potentialities. On the other hand, the more you use "non-organic" method for farming, the more you need them. So it's even worse on ...


4

Almost certainly the 200g containers. Imagine a cube of yoghurt (ugh!). Think about the amount of material that will required to fully encompass that cube. That is the 1kg container. Now imagine that that cube is partitioned into five parts, and think about the amount of additional material required to accomplish this. That is 5x 200g containers. The only ...


4

There are blister packs which appear to be made entirely from aluminium and I put these in the recycle bin in their entirety. I have also been recycling the blister packs made from plastic and aluminium. I do this by occasionally separating the aluminium from the plastic in a sort of game of 'patients' by trying to separate as much of the aluminium from the ...


4

As with most candy wrappers, it's a combination of plastic and aluminium also known as metallised plastic or metallised film. The material is hard to recycle because it's difficult to separate the two materials. There are a few recyclers that accept this material (e.g.TerraCycle in the US and the UK or the Recycle program in Australia) but not many do. It's ...


4

The City of Vancouver’s Waste Wizard says put them in the green bin. They also have a hotline you can call. Why wait for an answer here?


3

I often use a vacuum sealer to seal up food, including meat. I don't know how the freezer shelf life compares to the other answers, but anecdotally I can attest that I've never encountered problems using the stored food several weeks later. I buy vacuum sealed bags that I can reuse (albeit sometimes I have to cut off a small amount of the plastic to open ...


3

NO! Tea tree oil is toxic when swallowed, so I'd strongly advise against any intake of tea tree oil, and even more so if you are using it regularly. Even if you spit it out, some may be left behind and adverse effects may build up over time. Also, be very careful when taking medical advice from people on the Internet. Imagine if instead of the above I told ...


3

Simon W is overall correct. While when the size gets large enough the walls have to be thicker because of the weight involved, for small products, the problem is that they have to be strong enough for the handling machinery. However there is an easy way to test this: Weigh them. Empty of course. For each container wash it and weigh it. Don't forget the ...


3

Only thermo plastics have a recycle value, thermoset plastics do not. Even the thermo plastics are limited as recyclate - grade 1 recyclate, by grade 2 the polymers strands will no longer bond and the resultant product will develop weaknesses and start to split. As stated in the first answer, 'Yes... ...need to separate the different materials' it is this ...


3

Depends the type of cheese (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Types_of_cheese). Hard (type gouda) to half-hard half-soft (type monastery cheese) cheeses have a more or less hard crust (rind?). There is no more packaging needed if sold in one piece (unless maybe the rind is edible and should be wrapped for keeping it clean). Slices of hard/semi-hard cheese: let ...


2

Where I live, stores do not recycle as thoroughly as people do. Therefore, when I buy meat on a Styrofoam tray, I want to put that (rinsed) tray in my home recycle, not the stories generally mixed-together trash or garbage. So your approach isn't going to be effective as a short term way to reduce food packaging in the landfill. Further, the people who take ...


2

This is not ethical. From an economic ethics point of view, you are throwing away your own trash (which you bought and thus acquired a responsibility for) in someone else's dumpster. This basically amounts to stealing, since someone else is paying to have that trash disposed of. From an environmental ethics point of view, you are not reducing the amount ...


2

I don't think so and I do not think it would be an effective statement. The store will likely have practical reasons for packaging and could not change their ways even if they wanted to. And they would probably be happy to dispose of your trash for you as long as you buy from them. But ethically, I would say once you buy it, it is your responsibility. For ...


2

Baking Soda baking soda is said to be a great alternative to deodorant. Aloe Vera I myself sometimes use aloe vera. It stays moist a little longer, but the you'll also protect your skin as well. Mother Dirt Someone also spoke about a thing called mother dirt which would prevent corporal odors to develop by replacing ill-smelling bacteria


2

Packaging Considerations In your example of using bottles to contain a liquid being transported. All containers have a certain amount of required and excess material to enable them to hold a desired quantity of liquid. In the case of the bottles this material is in the thickness of the bottle, both the walls and the base. The large the container the ...


2

More reasons: The plastic makes it possible to see the bread. Shelf appeal. The paper allows them to be bagged warm. This gives a fresh bread smell around the shelf, and it feels warm in the customer's hand. Bag only: People have took in the bag to see it. Plastic only: Bread can't be bagged warm. A third option is to put naked loaves on display, and ...


2

Currently, tin or aluminum cans are easier and more environmentally recycled than Tetra Paks. That said, Tetra Pak is working hard to improve their product. One issue is that they mixed many materials in the Tetra Pak, while a tin can have a relatively simple recycling process. Metals have also been recycled for a longer amount of time, so there are more ...


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