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34

According to Stanford University, soiled food packaging should not be recycled like unstained paper and cardboard waste: Q: Why can't pizza boxes be recycled? A: Pizza boxes are made from corrugated cardboard, however the cardboard becomes soiled with grease, cheese, and other foods once the pizza has been placed in the box. Once soiled, the paper ...


31

In India you have to look hard to find toilet paper and if you do it is expensive. They wash themselves after each time the use the toilet (longer). For this purpose, public toilets (train stations, hotels, restaurants) in India sometimes have a (fairly high-power) shower head installed next to them. If you use shower gel for your washing process, the result ...


30

it is worth noting that although you can't recycle pizza boxes as cardboard, this doesn't mean you have to merely throw them away either. They form an almost perfect barrier layer for sheet mulches for example and you can compost them otherwise keeping in mind that they are a "brown" (i.e. high carbon, low nitrogen) and therefore act as a bit of a nitrogen ...


29

I started using a toilet paper alternative about nine months ago. I was tired of the old plumbing in the house clogging up, and knowing that toilet paper is a cut down tree used so I can wipe my ass, felt very wasteful. At the same time, we're living in a modern society. I'm a software engineer by trade, so I prefer using technology when I can. I found ...


20

Strictly in terms of energy efficiency, you're not gaining or saving energy by composting, but you're offsetting the energy needed to cut and process new trees by recycling the bags into new bags. So, from an energy perspective, recycling probably wins. For which one is 'better' (in the question title), we'd need to define better. It might also be good to ...


20

reduce, re-use, recycle, in that order. Get the uses you can out of the bags first. When that's done we get to the recycling bit. This includes basically three things you can do: Official recycling. This is probably the best thing to do with bags you have no other specific uses for. However in addition you can: papermaking (there are good how-tos on ...


15

Personally I use a wire rack over a cookie sheet to drain fried or greasy foods. The oil drips to the pan below and I can pour the oil into a container or dispose of it however I need to.


12

There is a possibility you are looking for the wrong thing. In Australia we have a reasonable selection of "not rebleached" 100% recycled toilet papers which are almost identical in whiteness to regular bleached papers. So maybe you are looking for brown when there are white options which fit what you are after (pulp sourced from sustainable options or 100% ...


11

Paper products should always be recycled first before composting (assuming they are clean and dry). This gives them another 'go' round the system. Once composted it takes a lot more time and resources to turn them back into paper.


11

I ask my colleagues to keep the papers they print and do not use anymore, and I pile them up, cut them in half and make two holes at the top. I bind them together with a binder ring and I have a new notepad! If the paper is soiled, I compost it (bakery paper bags, tissues). If it is office paper, after I wrote on both sides, I use it in my garden to layer ...


10

Most areas do collect paper for recycling. The paper gets chopped up into pulp. Air is introduced and the ink sticks to the air bubbles, which rise to the top. The ink bubbles are then skimmed of the top and the fibres are processed into recycled paper (newspaper, for example). This might be a nice little project, but I doubt anyone has the stamina to make ...


10

Disclaimer: I sometimes read up to three heavy books a week. I don't know how you'd begin to compare. What assumptions do you use regarding the lifecycle of the paper? Is the paper to be read once and then discarded? Is it recycled? Is it read over and over again? So rather than answer the question I want to explain why it is unanswerable by looking ...


10

Yes, there are plenty of suppliers, at least in the UK, that use recycled materials to make their toilet paper. You could also look for accreditation for sustainable sourcing: there are schemes such as the Forest Stewarship Council that accredit suppliers that meet their criteria for sustainability. Note that some of these accreditation schemes are ...


10

I'm adressing newspaper paper here specifically, but for some of these you can use other paper types as well. (Also, only things you can do repeatedly, and no low-volume hobby stuff like papier mache). Use for packaging. This may not get rid of all their old paper, and it may not look particularly festive, but 'in the old days' when we didn't yet have all ...


8

Try planting mullein (verbascum thapsus). It is a pioneer species that will grow in the worst soil conditions and improve the soil over time. It's leaves are large, thick and covered in a soft fuzz which gives them the feel of a high quality 3-ply TP. It also has a number of medicinal uses outside of hygiene. (I would advise against reusing "soiled" leaves ...


8

To add to Terry and Darren's suggestions, I wanted to insist on the fact that modern bidet attachments are available and easily installable on a sitting water toilet without major modification. This one I found at a "culturally aware" place in Brisbane, Australia (sorry about the bad quality of the photo): This kind of compact electronic attachment might ...


8

I know of two things you can do with it. If they burn wood (or anything else for heat) then they can make fire bricks with it. The neatest thing I know to do with it is to make your own paper out of it. Homemade recycled paper looks nice, and has a neat texture. Some people use it in place of stationary. I have not personally done either of these projects ...


8

This may depend on where you are (who does the processing and collecting, and what is the paper recycled into). I know for sure that here (The Netherlands) it does not matter: tape parts, staples, and paper clips are sieved out of the pulp when recycling the paper. I assume this is the case in all processes, you see this mentioned at many places: From The ...


7

Our local recycling center now takes food-soiled paper products for use in their composting program. You might look into that and see if there is anything like this in operation where you live.


7

We put shredded paper in our compost without noticeable ill effects, for much the reasons you are thinking about it (ie, it's readily available). The laser printer toner is probably better thought of as plastic than ink, and is unlikely to be biodegradable. It's apparently not toxic, it's just fine, inert particules (before it's printed). I suspect we're ...


6

The Romans of antiquity used a sponge on a stick. The sponge can be washed in a bucket with water and soap or eco friendly detergent.


6

I am surprised no-one has mentioned bidets yet, which in Japan is your high-tech toilet. (Though, it sounds like in India it is a shower!) The "eco sums" will get quite complicated, as you are trading some electricity and water to save a few sheets of paper. If you reduce from say 8 sheets of 1-ply down to 2 sheets, I imagine that is an overall saving: ...


6

I like to use wire cooling racks, brown paper bags, and cloth dishtowels dedicated to this endeavor would work for draining. Paper towels you do use might be compostable.


5

Females can certainly reduce their TP use by using cut up cloth to wipe after #1. Using the cut off tops of old cotton socks works really well too. They have a good amount of thickness for absorption. Small cotton cloths & sock tops take up hardly any space in a load of laundry and can be reused over and over. Reduce your use of precious tree fibres, and ...


5

There were two great related articles in The New York Times last month concerning recycling: Your Recycling Gets Recycled, Right? Maybe, or Maybe Not 6 Things You’re Recycling Wrong In the latter article they specifically address the subject of pizza boxes as one of the six: Pizza boxes are among the most common offenders when it comes to ...


5

Their website states that: it is rated as "excellent" on the WWF Check Your Paper platform (see here) it is FSC® Recycled certified it is Chlorine-free bleached their producing mills are ISO 14001 (environmental management) certified it is CO2 neutral optional (it looks like some of their paper supports a hydro electricity project in Indonesia) It is hard ...


5

Depends on the type of cloth. Natural fibres such as cotton and wool often make sustainable materials, especially if they are certified organic as this adds a greater level of sustainability to the product. Wiping cloths for babies can be washed by hand to reduce the water use and increase the sustainability of its usage rather than using a washing machine. ...


5

The city of Ottawa apparently composts butcher's paper without distinction. Both Oakland and Berkeley include butcher's paper in their compostable lists (and Berkeley's even includes "Brown Waxed Paper Sheets"). The town of Sherborn also says that "wax paper and butcher paper" can go in your compost pile. However, the city of Portland does not want butcher'...


5

They could put it in their garden to suppress weeds and leave it there to break down. It conserves water and keeps the soil cooler too for the earthworm population. Putting it down between the rows keeps you from getting muddy feet when you are out there working after a rain. Put rocks and water on it initially to keep it on the ground and from blowing away.


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