13

If you are able to, you could discontinue the use of deodorant. I haven't used any in years and don't miss it a bit. However, I know that isn't for everyone. My boyfriend swears by using baking soda mixed with cornstarch (and I can vouch that it really works). This great article on My Plastic-Free Life looks at a bunch of home made deodorants. The ...


10

My toothpaste is made from natural materials (mainly clay, small quantities of herb extracts and essential oils) and comes in a (recyclable) aluminium tube. The cap is from recyclable plastic (but of course for plastics, "recycling" means downcycling). I find this toothpaste marvellous and pretty sustainable (except for the plastic cap). The clay part ...


7

I'm not sure about donating leftover bits... But for recycling/reusing, what I normally do is grab a new bar, and at the end of my shower/bath, get both the new bar and the small used piece(s) wet and squeeze them together relatively firmly. Leave it in the soap dish / on the shelf and they will dry that way. The next time you shower/bathe, you'll have a ...


4

You should look at the corporate responsibility of the companies who make toothpaste. Some will be better than others and you can be sure that many will be incentive by both government tax schemes and public opinion to reduce the negative footprint of their products. You can also be sure that the bigger companies are almost always better equipped financially ...


4

I'm an energy consultant - I'm also aware of the environmental impacts of plastic - however; I still have to ask, what is the issue with plastic? The only thing more sustainable than plastic is SOME wood IF it is carefully cared for. The carbon embedded in the production of plastic is VERY low compared to say aluminium, stainless etc... Plastic is a great ...


3

Update: Medical Research references attached in this article - 6 Natural Ways To Stop And Heal Receding Gums Before It’s Too Late I have the best source of information for this. I will not get a lot of votes for this as most people tend to believe AMA & Pharma lobby, but the information comes from the most reliable sources of ancient herbal wisdom. ...


3

Another option would be to use a cheese grater to turn the soap into flakes for use as laundry soap. Lux, in fact, is available as laundry flakes from the supermarket. Cannot comment on the biodegradability of Mysore Sandal, however the MSDS for Lux claims the product is biodegradable. Unfortunately no information on eco-toxicity.


3

Baking soda. Also cheap and useful in many other contexts.


2

Baking Soda baking soda is said to be a great alternative to deodorant. Aloe Vera I myself sometimes use aloe vera. It stays moist a little longer, but the you'll also protect your skin as well. Mother Dirt Someone also spoke about a thing called mother dirt which would prevent corporal odors to develop by replacing ill-smelling bacteria


2

There are a few recipes available out there. Most of those that I have seen are oil based and the ingredients that they use are very easy to buy (at least where I live). I will give you an example which uses just three ingredients (you can find different variations of this recipe here or here). The ingredients used are coconut oil, shea butter and olive oil....


2

I don't think there is a clear answer to this question. In a public environment where there is the risk of someone leaving the water running, then almost certainly yes. In a household where people can be taught and trusted to use water respectfully, especially hot water, then probably no, because the negligible resources saved is likely to be offset by the ...


2

What I have ended up doing is making my own toothpaste using kaolin clay, essential oils, marine salt and an infusion of herbs. There are a lot of recipes on the internet for making your own toothpaste using natural ingredients as this one (which is very similar to the one that I followed) or this one. I consider this more sustainable than conventional ...


2

We set them in a jar lid. With a hole in the bottom to drain. Set on sink. Small left over soap is good for washing your hands. Once supper small. Throw in bucket with a little water. Use to soak panties overnight & such. Before washing by hand.


2

You can dissolve the bits in water to make liquid soap.


2

In e.g. China, L-cysteine is produced from human hair (among other things) and used as a dough conditioner (bread 'improver') https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rKoi3P84OQU Or Google for l-cystine bread improver human hair


2

No, polyacrylamide is not used to make plastic microbeads According to Wikipedia, polyacrylamide "is highly water-absorbent, forming a soft gel when hydrated." This property makes it useful for several functions: Manufacture of soft contact lenses As a thickener and suspending agent As a filler in facial cosmetic surgery As a soil conditioner to increase ...


1

I was looking into this question for a project at work and found some research studies addressing water savings from automated faucets. Automated faucets result in increased water and energy usage, based on several real-world studies Increased water usage Hills, Birks, and McKenzie, 2002. "The Millennium Dome 'Watercycle' experiment: to evaluate water ...


1

I have found it good to deter rabbits from eating shrubbery/gardens, sprinkled on the ground. You don't need much as it lasts a long time.


1

If I were you I would collect them in a tin (or some container which doesn't take up big space), and the first time I go to some waste collector to get rid of something special (even if that might be in 3 years from now), I would just take them too. Might be less of an effort than making individual trips to get rid of a few blades.


1

A stainless-steel scrap-metal recycler can handle razor blades but they would need a very large load to be interested.


1

There are a bunch of different materials called alum. The most common, is potassium aluminum sulfate. KAl(SO4)2 * 12 H2O The material is very soluble in hot water, and melts at 92.5 C (less than boiling point for water.) Because of it's general solubility, I don't know if the stones sold are pure alum. You may want to add some form of filler that would ...


1

There are three ways I know of: 1: High PH (alkaline) cleaner such as borax, soda ash, baking soda. If you are able to raise the PH above the PH of the charcoal, it will come right off. 2: Natural solvents such as orange oil or lemon/lime juice. Natural solvents that contain citric acid will remove it as well. 3: Distilled white vinegar. Opposite on PH ...


1

There are a lot of alternatives to make your own shampoo at home and many of them use castile soap (because it doesn't involve any kind of animal fat in the production process). You have a few examples here and here. The idea behind all of them is pretty similar, mixing castile soap (I am pretty sure that other kinds of soap can be used but this is the one ...


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