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Since nobody answered, I thought I’d post an answer with what I’ve been able to find out myself Types There is a list of 7 different neonicotinoid insecticides on Wikipedia: Acetamiprid Clothianidin Dinotefuran Imidacloprid Nitenpyram Thiacloprid Thiamethoxam Some say that Sulfoxaflor is also a neonicotinoid, but not everyone agrees with this. The ...


6

You should try boric acid. Yes, it is an acid, but it is safe enough to be used as an eye wash for medical purposes. It is also toxic to ants and safe to use around the kitchen. I'm not sure if you consider it sustainable or not, but mixed with powdered salt or sugar, it gets rid of ants quite effectively. I'm not quite clear on what you mean about non-...


5

I just came across this page as I was looking for a list of products with neonicotinoids in them. I found a list for the UK and another one for the US. The Xerces Society link includes links to additional articles with slightly different lists of products. I have also heard nurseries use potting soil with neonicotinoids in the potted plants they sell. Haven'...


4

Make sure your roses are not in a location with strong winds, if so relocate them. The best place is a sunny area with at least 4 hours of sun and only slightly windy. Use an organic fertilizer so the roses have enough nutrients. Usually you need to do this twice a year (early spring and after the first flush of bloom) but check the instructions on the ...


4

Make your own Sticky Fly Traps using Tanglefoot’s Tangle-Trap Sticky Coating. Easy to make, cheap and highly non-toxic.      Make it of strips of paper/plastic and hang it around your roses. If you choose the right color you can make them almost invisible.


4

Spray the plants with soapy water; a natural vegetable-based soap will work fine (no more than about a tablespoon per 2 liters of water). Make sure to spray the undersides of the leaves too. However, do first check for ladybugs or other aphid predators; if there are any such predators present, there is no need to spray at all (and the soap would kill them ...


4

Many 'tree farmers' spray trees to increase the shelf-life. We know bugs and fungi will attack organic matter such as the Christmas trees once there is the opportunity to. There are pesticides and herbicides used throughout the life of the tree and these are all known to have residual effects that can last many years. Surveys carried out by Dr. Steve Toth, ...


4

It's all a matter of how you do the counting! If you take into account how much diversity you destroy, non-organic food is worse than "too much" cardboard packaging. But how do you count this? Life has no price, and damages are potentialities. On the other hand, the more you use "non-organic" method for farming, the more you need them. So it's even worse on ...


4

For most insects a mixture of 1 cup water, 1 cup borax powder or welding flux, and 1 cup honey works. Dissolve the borax in water, add the honey, and mix. Spray around edges, under the fridge etc. It is safe to use. Honey draws most insects to eat it. The borax sticks to them and perforates their shells, so that they 'bleed' to death. They also carry it ...


3

Weed control is easier in greenhouses, so herbicides aren't used much. However the higher humidity levels and more constant temperatures make both insect and fungi much larger pests. The expense of operating a greenhouse also pushes to maximize production per square foot, so the use of fertilizers is increased. I would expect more pesticide use per tonne ...


3

To a general question this general answer: I don't know, but in general I don't think so ;-) but then again, ... First: a greenhouse is not a closed environment. It is aerated (insects can come in and go out) and (unless the water is drained in an isolated way) water escapes via the soil (residue pesticide escapes also). Second: pesticides can be a lot of ...


3

I personally use a combination of d-limonene & borax. First, borax is a natural occurring salt from lake beds and d-limonene is basically just orange oil, a solvent. Mix the two together and spray on nest. *****NOTE***** Because the d-limonene is a solvent, it will disolve plastics & rubber seals. Use a solvent safe sprayer. OR You can use ...


3

One of the best ways to minimize the impact of pesticides on vegetables as a consumer is to plant a garden (or buy from someone with growing practices you trust and understand). That way you know most of what's going into it (other than environmental pollution and such, which is probably present in the others in equivalent amounts anyway). Growing indoors is ...


3

I am a grower of herbs and alpines. I use only bioinsecticide ie critters that control other critters. In the uk as far as I can tell there is only one product still in use as an insecticide from the group of chemicals known as neonicitinoids. It has very strict conditions of use one of which is that treated plants must not be planted in the ground for 9 ...


3

I would suggest baking soda. It is very effective against ants, cheap and available in the supermarket. Just put some on the areas that frequented by the ants and if you can locate the points they enter your house and put some there. A chemical reaction I can't describe right now will kill the ants when they eat the powder. I had the same problem with my pot ...


2

Sticky Fly Traps are great in greenhouses, but rapidly overwhelmed outdoor. And ladybirds are inefficient in face of an herd of green flies protected by ant shepherds (the ants protect the greenflies from which they eat some secretion). Having tried several solutions, the best thing for me is to spray a mix of black soap and water. The basic recipe is to ...


2

I found what looks to be a fairly comprehensive (and easily printable!) list of products to avoid here: http://www.beyondpesticides.org/pollinators/documents/pesticide_list_final.pdf


2

I found more information about these 'rumours'. An expert on forests working for the German WWF has told the German 'Taz' newspaper that many Christmas trees grown in Germany are full of pesticides. The German growers claim the use of pesticides is necessary due to the widespread use of monocultures (to keep the prices low). In monocultures diseases and ...


2

Another way is to use a trap to get rid of them. I hate wasps and these devices work quite good and most importantly passively (i.e. you don't have to spray the wasps). It's also very easy to build one yourself if you want to try it out without spending money. The traps work by luring the wasps in with something they like (e.g. sweet soda). Due to the trap's ...


2

One method that I have found to be particularly good is using a soap with surfactants in a Hand Pump Garden Sprayer which can be found for under $20, for example here is one on Amazon that looks similar to the one I have. Fill the tank with some water and enough mild dishwashing soap such as Dawn to make a soapy feeling liquid between your fingers. I found ...


2

If you have a particular location in the room where you suspect they may have been used, you could try releasing some live bugs there (ones that are moderately welcome indoors), eg some jumpy spiders. If they quickly die, that would indicate insecticide use. Obviously you would ensure any bugs released are in good health to start with, and release several ...


2

It's common practice for professional growers to use pesticides when cultivating flower bulbs. Greenpeace investigated the use of pesticides in commercially sold flowering plants in Europe and found that: Only 2% of the samples contained no detectable residues. Insecticides regarded as of particular toxicological significance to bees were found frequently....


2

If it was easy to remove any pesticide or residue from a large variety of fruits and vegetables, by rinsing or soaking them in some easily-available harmless product, then there would be far less need for activists to try to get companies to stop using such products on our food. (Not zero need: the effect on farm workers, on bees, and on the ground where the ...


1

Summary: either there is no link, or no one did any research on this. The latter doesn't seem likely given the amount of research there has been on grain protein content. Most likely the farmer meant 'use of herbicides' as this does have an effect on protein content. I don't have access to the full article, but in this abstract they say that the grain ...


1

Farmers wanting (or being forced) to avoid the use of pesticides have a wide variety of choices at their disposal. Most of them will in fact alter the quality of the crop, but most of the alternatives are often not known or considered. Switching to a different variety is obviously one of the easiest, but it also has a big effect on the final product. ...


1

I wash vegetables under tap water. For leafy vegetables I use potassium permanganate solution. That's all, no complicated processes :) The following explanatory paragraph was taken from article Potassium Permanganate to Wash Vegetables. Also have a look at How to clean Fruits and Vegetables for more information. Potassium permanganate solutions ...


1

Different groups have put forward different lists of foods one should always buy organic and foods one does not need to buy organic. To make it catchy, some have created a Dirty Dozen list and a Clean 15 list. Different groups have assembled different lists, with some overlap. Here are items I've found on various Dirty Dozen lists that have some of the ...


1

Your question is quite broad, but I've been following the following practice for non-organic apples, once recommended to me by a bio-chemist. Apparently, apples are usually sprayed with oil/wax-based pesticides. The oil "protects" the apples from yeasts/pests and "keeps the face pretty". You can use normal soap (e.g. dish-washing liquid) to remove the oil/...


1

Rubbing alcohol will prevent all insects. Of course, it doesn't last very long. Clove powder will kill ants, even causing burning to them if it is just sprinkled on top of them. But, I do not know the way to get cinnon into the hive. If put along the edges, it will be extremely effective at first but after the worst part of the oils wear off they may ...


1

I had tried Lemon juice spray on Ants and it worked well. I used un-fresh lemon and squeezed its juice into spray-can containing water and sprayed it on ants. On next days, ants weren't there!


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