13

I'm not going to answer the support the recycling part of your question, but the avoid new production part. One stream of aluminium goes in to the coating of plastic for packaging food (coffee, crisps, etc). Although this layer is extremely thin (0.0055-0.1 mm) the total amounts are large. Recycling this metalized plastic (metalized film) is doable but ...


6

Scrap metals are not cleaned, they are melted. For steel; Zn, Sn, Pb, and others vaporize or oxidize. The most problematic is Zn as the oxide in the slag can deteriorate the refractory. Aluminum is similar except scrape with Cu and Si will be segregated as much as possible, used for certain alloys. Copper scrap, being more valuable is separated according to ...


4

Since the original poster is in Vancouver, British Columbia, here is a response to this same question from the Recycling Council of British Columbia (Hotline@rcbc.ca) Summary: Rinse and remove grease soaked portions (garbage) before placing in the Blue Bin. That container you have is a tricky item to deal with. Since it is product packaging, it is ...


4

Oh, that's really not a problem. Recycling metal involves pre-processing. They are concerned with contaminants like paint and plating getting into the batch. What they use to remove paint and galvanization will certainly remove grease.


4

The old rails are certainly reused frequently here in the UK - they start off being used on high-speed lines. When they're too worn for that they get reused on low-speed lines, and then again on rarely-used sidings (spurs in US parlance). Once they're too worn to be used as rails at all, they get reused for other things - e.g. fence posts and supports for ...


3

Are you sure it doesn't? In sparkling water cans, sometimes the deposit label is stamped on the top (from a sparkling water I'm about to enjoy): The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation has a list of "Frequently Asked Questions About the Bottle Bill" which confirms that there is a deposit for these types of beverage cans (emphasis added): ...


3

I'll grant this is just an opinion... ... But you are better off creating a waste stream that lends itself to recycling. Maybe they bury all the 1+2 recyclables (which are chemically the same, just different treatment). But they bury them together. So when the economics change, and it becomes worth digging up 1/2, it is economical to do so, because they ...


3

You (probably) cannot do it on demand side. The reason this is impossible is that 99% of aluminum users don't care if their aluminum comes from recycled sources. Let's say there's need for 100 units of aluminum, out of which 50 units are new, and 50 units are recycled. Now, you introduce one unit of aluminum consumption, with the requirement that it comes ...


3

1. Reuse There are several websites describing ways to reuse aluminium cans, for example this page on WikiHow.com or this one on Earth911.com. Most common is to reuse them as a holder of some sorts (e.g. a pencil holder or candle holder), as earrings or as coasters. But I guess there a only so many pencil or candle holders and coasters you can use, so I ...


3

I contacted Kidde through Twitter, and they ultimately responded to me via e-mail. The document they sent (available here) is dated March 2017, so more recent than the data available on their website. Here are the steps you'll need to take in order to return your Kidde ionization smoke detectors to Kidde for disposal: Confirm that your smoke detector is ...


3

I've experimented with soaking foil-backed blister packs in caustic soda solution, commonly sold as a material to unclog drains. Caustic soda (sodium hydroxide, NaOH) dissolves the aluminium foil. The caustic soda solution can burn skin, so it needs care in using it. The dissolved aluminium produces sodium aluminate solution which can be flushed away with ...


3

The dirt that you are seeing is probably just marks made by rubber conveyer belts that are very common in the shipping industry. That's not a problem at all for the recycler. That all comes out in the wash. By the time it gets made into new packaging material it's usually pretty clean. If the final product isn't clean, it won't be used for food. If it's ...


3

The picture says 'made from coffee chaff & plant-based material', so there is something else in the pod besides just coffee chaff. After some digging I finally found this blog where it says that: The filter was maybe the most challenging part of this development..... The PLA fibers (PLA is made using corn sugars) have to stretch to hold the coffee ...


2

Hair can also be used to clean oil spills. Stuffed into upcycled pantyhose, it serves as an eco-friendly way of adsorbing oil spills which then allegedly can be composted with the help of worms. Sources: BBC article, Vox video.


2

Self answer, a bit off-topic maybe (depending on whether compost is considered recycling): If like I do, one considers composting a cleaner/higher/more efficient way of recycling, then for months (almost two years I think) I have been putting the pizza cardboards in my vermicompost/lombricompost device. Oil is not an issue for the worms, they eat it all ...


2

Reuse beats recycling. The active duty life span of an EV battery (cells and control electronics both) is hugely longer outside of an EV, so reclaiming lithium from them should be a last resort only at the point where no more economical uses for them exist. Thinking of the huge electric vehicle batteries as resources to recycle, once they no longer serve ...


2

If the goal is sustainability and I can only choose one, I'd choose aluminum. Aluminum is relatively cost-effective to recycle and doesn't decompose on its own. Paper is middling efficient to recycle, and decomposes on its own — eventually. Plastic is relatively inefficient to recycle, and also doesn't decompose much on its own — which means we should avoid ...


2

Short answer: no, you can't assume anything. Food packaging can be pretty much any type of plastic, some of which are totally unrecyclable by their chemical nature. It's possible that there may be some other use end use for nonrecyclable plastic - being shredded and incorporated into other materials for instance. Supermarkets and other businesses are ...


2

I followed the above instructions (which I got from Kidde directly BEFORE finding this article), waited the "2 to 4 weeks" for a response and... nothing. No response either way. I then called another 800 number from their web site and was assured they would accept them back if they came in the mail marked disposal.


2

You can advocate for a carbon tax. When fossil fuel energy costs more, recycling is more economically valuable. Cheap power means easier to mine new aluminum. We really need a carbon tax for many reasons. They used to make a zillion tons of aluminum in the United States Pacific Northwest with dirt-cheap hydro power. But when electricity got expensive in ...


2

In e.g. China, L-cysteine is produced from human hair (among other things) and used as a dough conditioner (bread 'improver') https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rKoi3P84OQU Or Google for l-cystine bread improver human hair


2

You are too late. A great tonnage of rail has already been used in the US. There is not "much" left in terms of serious usage. RR rails are hard, that is to say, they have a relatively high carbon content, so they can't be made into just anything. Concrete rebar WAS a perfect match for old rails, so essentially all old rail became rebar. Rebar is ...


1

If I were you I would collect them in a tin (or some container which doesn't take up big space), and the first time I go to some waste collector to get rid of something special (even if that might be in 3 years from now), I would just take them too. Might be less of an effort than making individual trips to get rid of a few blades.


1

A stainless-steel scrap-metal recycler can handle razor blades but they would need a very large load to be interested.


1

Addressing the last paragraph of the question: No, this is not carbon capture according to the definition (this one from Wikipedia): Carbon capture and storage (CCS) (or carbon capture and sequestration or carbon control and sequestration) is the process of capturing waste carbon dioxide. It's creative bookkeeping ;-) If you first extract oil from the ...


1

A 30 minute drive would be approximately 15 miles, an average small car produces 200 grams of CO2 per mile, so you are emitting about 3 Kg of CO2. The CO2 footprint of new plastic manufacture is about 6 Kg CO2 per 1 Kg of plastic. For recycled plastic manufacture its about 3.5 Kg CO2 per Kg of plastic. So the nett difference is 2.5 Kg CO2. Supposing that ...


1

Here we have a more expensive disposal system for anything with food residue. Dry goods and wet goods go to different land fills. They encourage us to rinse food containers and discard into the dry waste/construction waste. In the recycle streams they don't take dirty paper/cardboard or dirty sheet plastic. But they take any kind of plastic pail, even ...


1

Here in the UK we are specifically told not to bag recyclable products, as it makes it more difficult for them to be sorted on arrival at the recycling facility - plus the bag itself can't be recycled, and so contaminates the recycling load - which in the worst case can mean the entire truck-load being landfilled... Our refuse trucks are enclosed though, so ...


1

Contrary to the common mantra of "reduce, reuse, recycle", aluminium is best recycled instead of reused in a household setting. The reason for this is that demand for aluminium currently far outstrips the available quantity in the market, even at theoretically a 100% recycling rate. Thus, repurposing aluminium cans for things such as pen holders actually ...


1

First, it's pretty easy to remove sugary contaminants from the can right after you drain it. Everything is still wet, and you can just use dilution homeopathy style. If water is an issue in your area, get all the liquid out as best you can e.g. By shaking in sink add just an ounce or so of water cover the hole with your thumb and shake repeat I am not a ...


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