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Addressing the last paragraph of the question: No, this is not carbon capture according to the definition (this one from Wikipedia): Carbon capture and storage (CCS) (or carbon capture and sequestration or carbon control and sequestration) is the process of capturing waste carbon dioxide. It's creative bookkeeping ;-) If you first extract oil from the ...


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You (probably) cannot do it on demand side. The reason this is impossible is that 99% of aluminum users don't care if their aluminum comes from recycled sources. Let's say there's need for 100 units of aluminum, out of which 50 units are new, and 50 units are recycled. Now, you introduce one unit of aluminum consumption, with the requirement that it comes ...


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I'm not going to answer the support the recycling part of your question, but the avoid new production part. One stream of aluminium goes in to the coating of plastic for packaging food (coffee, crisps, etc). Although this layer is extremely thin (0.0055-0.1 mm) the total amounts are large. Recycling this metalized plastic (metalized film) is doable but ...


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A 30 minute drive would be approximately 15 miles, an average small car produces 200 grams of CO2 per mile, so you are emitting about 3 Kg of CO2. The CO2 footprint of new plastic manufacture is about 6 Kg CO2 per 1 Kg of plastic. For recycled plastic manufacture its about 3.5 Kg CO2 per Kg of plastic. So the nett difference is 2.5 Kg CO2. Supposing that ...


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Short answer: no, you can't assume anything. Food packaging can be pretty much any type of plastic, some of which are totally unrecyclable by their chemical nature. It's possible that there may be some other use end use for nonrecyclable plastic - being shredded and incorporated into other materials for instance. Supermarkets and other businesses are ...


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My favorite home is net zero energy and I try to run it net negative for all inputs including food, trash, fuel, power, water, wastewater, and money. I have a dishwasher, but I've never used it and probably never will. As long as it remains unused, it registers zero for all inputs except trash for which it scores negative. Although it's in nearly new ...


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Here we have a more expensive disposal system for anything with food residue. Dry goods and wet goods go to different land fills. They encourage us to rinse food containers and discard into the dry waste/construction waste. In the recycle streams they don't take dirty paper/cardboard or dirty sheet plastic. But they take any kind of plastic pail, even ...


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Here in the UK we are specifically told not to bag recyclable products, as it makes it more difficult for them to be sorted on arrival at the recycling facility - plus the bag itself can't be recycled, and so contaminates the recycling load - which in the worst case can mean the entire truck-load being landfilled... Our refuse trucks are enclosed though, so ...


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Embodied vs working energy. You would have to calculate the embodied energy that went into the production of both products. At some point the dishwasher will seem like the winner here as it should last a good portion of the time and be repaired for a fraction of the embodied energy of replacing it. The opposite is true when we look at the working energy ...


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Fleece if you mean synthetic fleece and not the fleece of a sheep,is not a good or sustainable alternative to cotton. Synthetic clothing is essentially a plastic, made from oil, and it does not break down in the environment for thousands, and as micro-particles'- perhaps millions of years. Moreover not much research has been done on the effects of breathing ...


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I put 'recyclable 'stuff in a plastic bin bag once and got a telling off from the dustman. I believe they make paper bags for so called 'recyclable 'rubbish but they're very expensive. I normally put mine in a cardboard box now. Shops sometimes leave cardboard boxes out for free. So far the dustman hasn't objected to this.


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The short answer is no. Almost nothing made of any plastic is, at the moment, sustainable. I don't know what it is like in the States, but in Britain all the different kinds of plastic are so mixed up in every product, that it is impossible to separate them and something like ninety percent is either dumped in landfill, which is usually conveniently near ...


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