14

Baking Soda and Lemon should be on the top of your list. There are different solutions to use based the situation. I have found the following site useful for a more natural and safe way to clean food and stuff around the house, http://eartheasy.com/live_nontoxic_solutions.htm


13

In addition to Baking Soda and Lemon, as @Colby mentioned, I'd add that Vinegar will clean most everything; it is non-toxic and cheap. I've found it to be very effective for getting rid of molds and musty smells. If you get Vinegar on your food, who cares, right? You could still eat it, unless you don't like the taste.


8

All fruits and vegetables give off ethylene, a harmless, natural plant hormone that stimulates ripening. Ripe bananas give off a relatively large amount of etyhlene, so placing other fruits in a confined space (a paper bag works great) together with some ripe bananas or banana peels will speed up the ripening of the other fruits. Some examples of fruits ...


8

I'm in the cleanliness is over-hyped in our culture camp, so I probably have a different outlook than you. But, I wash surfaces mostly with just water and a cloth. If there's grease to cut or I want to damage microorganisms, I'll wipe down with vinegar. I don't even use baking soda for surfaces -- just for burned pans and such. This mild sanitation ...


6

You'd be surprised how much you can achieve with a piece of cotton, clean water and much patience. While camping, we're cleaning all pots with water and a piece of grass or leaves. It requires more time than using detergents and hot water, but it is possible. Fats don't dissolve in water, so you can use a bit of alcohol for them. Home-made, of course :)


6

This is a question that many Departments of Transportation have struggled with as well! There are other chemicals that you can use, but all of them will have at least some impact on the environment. Even sand can cause problems in our stormwater systems. Other chlorides (magnesium chloride and calcium chloride) are popular as alternatives, but still have ...


4

I think it would be milk paint. http://www.milkpaint.com/ Milk Paint receives USDA Biobased Certification Safe for MCS, Hospitals, Children's things and the Environment


4

Make sure your roses are not in a location with strong winds, if so relocate them. The best place is a sunny area with at least 4 hours of sun and only slightly windy. Use an organic fertilizer so the roses have enough nutrients. Usually you need to do this twice a year (early spring and after the first flush of bloom) but check the instructions on the ...


4

Make your own Sticky Fly Traps using Tanglefoot’s Tangle-Trap Sticky Coating. Easy to make, cheap and highly non-toxic.      Make it of strips of paper/plastic and hang it around your roses. If you choose the right color you can make them almost invisible.


2

Sticky Fly Traps are great in greenhouses, but rapidly overwhelmed outdoor. And ladybirds are inefficient in face of an herd of green flies protected by ant shepherds (the ants protect the greenflies from which they eat some secretion). Having tried several solutions, the best thing for me is to spray a mix of black soap and water. The basic recipe is to ...


1

Ducks will eat slugs and produce duck eggs (hens), duck meat (hens and drakes), and high-nitrogen contributions (poop) to your compost pile or directly in your garden area.


1

If you want commercial products check out Good Guide, they rank products based on ingredient hazards and larger environmental impact. They have an extremely large database and rank things from cleaners to food to makeup.


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