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13

TLDR: in this particular case, where the buyer lives very close to the shop, it's likely that buying in a brick-and-mortar shop has a lower carbon footprint compared to buying online. Online shopping may become greener when the distance to the shop is more than 14 - 50km (depending on your shopping behavior and on which scientific study you consult). I ...


10

It depends on your definition of sustainable. Your question doesn't have an absolute answer as stated. Sustainable can refer to an individual, a community, a region, a country, or civilization as a whole. It is also used to make reference to the effect on the environment (which can become very controversial). If you make your money from the local community ...


8

I freeze bananas in a plastic container, which I wash and reuse. I also wash and reuse Ziploc-type plastic bags, which work equally well, but don't last quite as long. If your wife prefers aluminium, you can probably find an aluminium container (e.g. in an outdoor store), which should last you for several decades.


6

I simply freeze them, they don't need a container if you're going to eat them soonish (within a month, perhaps). When you take one out if you run it under water for a few seconds the skin loosens up and they just pop out. I squeeze them into my smoothies. If your wife eats them as a whole fruit, rather than in a smoothie, you can improve the condition ...


6

Like other fruits and vegetables I would just put them into a plastic container. It is practical to separate the pieces by plastic foil so that they can be easily separated in the frozen state. Both the boxes and foils can be reused without washing for a limited time when kept in cold. Later they can be washed and reused again.


5

I've had good success with the following system. All you need are two stronger plastic bags with handles: Bag one: non-handled bags 'roll and rip' style produce bags from the market bread bags ziploc bags anything else without a handle Bag two: handled bags plastic grocery bags mall shopping bags (think h&m or something — attached handles ...


5

In this question about rooftop hydro I covered the efficiency question almost as an aside. I can't find an actual plant with efficiency over 80%, only claims that that might be possible. The average efficiency will be much lower than the peak, as a lot of plants are old and have efficiencies around 60% (although some have been refitted to boost efficiency). ...


5

We just freeze bananas in their skins. But I do that when they're getting a bit old, and when I thaw them it's for cooking, so I'm not sure how edible they are.


4

Most places that generate a lot of cardboard (grocery stores, Costco, etc) seem to use a cardboard "baling" machine -- this machine will compress the cardboard and strap it to hold it together. You can often see the bales of cardboard behind the store or on their loading dock, awaiting pickup by a recycler. Photo from http://www.thecompactorguy.com/ This ...


4

I would chop them into suitable chunks and pop into a freezer bag, making sure the bags are not over filled and freeze only a few bags at a time on a clear bit of freezer shelf. Once frozen then can be stacked as normal in your freezer. Now I can grab the quantity I need.


3

STES (Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage) is, in most cases, too expensive to really be practical because of the huge quantity of the storage medium needed to supply the seasonal demand. Typically, you loose a good portion of the heat through conduction or have to invest heavily in insulated containment. I find it difficult enough designing thermal stores for ...


3

Energy Storage Association cites round trip efficiencies above 80% http://energystorage.org/energy-storage/technologies/pumped-hydroelectric-storage As for the evaporation question. I don't know of any specific data on it, but would expect it to be minimal if you charge the reservoir during off-peak (cheaper) hours and discharge it during the morning ramp. ...


3

I often use a vacuum sealer to seal up food, including meat. I don't know how the freezer shelf life compares to the other answers, but anecdotally I can attest that I've never encountered problems using the stored food several weeks later. I buy vacuum sealed bags that I can reuse (albeit sometimes I have to cut off a small amount of the plastic to open ...


2

You're smart to figure out a way that works for you to store & access your used bags. Without that they're not nearly as re-usable! We use these strategies to cut through the clutter & make our bags more manageable: Bring as few home as possible We keep reusable shopping & produce bags in a front closet so it's easy to grab on the way to the ...


2

I push them into the gap between a cupboard and a wall, the cupboard is about 6 foot tall so there's plenty of space and I can put/take from the gap as I want. Maybe I'm a bit of a cheap skate but didn't want to buy something to solve this problem. Sometimes two come out, but hey, it's not difficult to pop the extra one back in. When I moved house, I had to ...


2

Your idea is interesting but would fail in the real world for a number of reasons: The energy embodied in even a moderate storm is staggering. No amount of "Stormbuoys" could make even a dent on a severe storm. Their density would need to be so high that shipping and navigation would be impossible. You will never "mitigate the devastation of storms" with ...


2

No it is not. Your calculations of 13year ROI is based on the assumption that charging the power wall is free during the day time. It is not. Depending on your locale, either you need to factor in the cost of additional solar capacity or lost feed in revenue. This will easily push your ROI into the 20 year territory. Assuming that your locale supports ...


2

It may be technically feasible. But in reality, for places that do desalination, it's never going to be economical, because there's already an easier way to do things. Storage on the grid is useful because it enables more supply to be matched to more demand. It does that by shifting energy from the time it is generated to the time it is used. There is ...


1

I have done this sort of, in reverse. I'm a tree farmer. I get seedlings and to extend the time I can plant them I have made a cold room. This is a 12x12 foot room with 4" fiberglass + 12" strawbale insulation. Inside are 10 45 gallon drums of water on sections of pallet and 4" of styrofoam chips on top. In the winter, the door is left open and the fan on....


1

This all seems highly inefficient. Your one calculation based om m*g*h is meaningless, g is not 9.8 here. You have to displace the sea water which is almost as dense as the saltier water you want to descend. I do not understand how you regard bringing slightly heavier water down as "energy storage". Once the saltier water is down, you want to have caught ...


1

As a Mechanical Engineer, I know the efficiency of the pump(s) and generator will be a function of the head or the height difference between the upper and lower reservoirs. Also, the line losses will increase with distance. Finally, an uncovered reservoir in an arid climate will suffer evaporation losses. Therefore, there isn't a single answer to this ...


1

Leaking AA / AAA batteries are mostly due to overcharge when you use those chargers that charge them in pairs. See picture below for example. Get a dedicated slow charger that is able to charge single cell, that way you'll able to safely charge your battery to full without overcharging. Never get those fast charger as they tend to heat up your battery to ...


1

If your venting system can be started depending on a given (and changeable) humidity degree, then this is a very good thing for the cellar. Indeed, extracting humidity circulates air in the basement. We could think this is an issue because it will warm the place, which could be bad if you intend to keep, say, fruits and vegetable for later use. (I myself am ...


1

The article you linked says that the salt content of the seawater released by the desalinization plant is increased by 20%, not that the effluent is 20% salt. This means that normal 3.5% salt seawater becomes something like 4.2% salt seawater. Plug that difference into your mgh equation and desalinization plant numbers you get 110 kwH per day of desalinated ...


1

Good for the company that's greening-up their processes! The greenest options are to Reduce the stored amount (ordering less) or facilitate Reuse (i.e. package outgoing items; set up a box pickup for employees; list boxes for giveaway on a specific date using Craigslist, Facebook ReuseIt groups or Freecycle). I get a lot of deliveries & once a month take ...


1

Categorise the bags into a maximum of four categories. E.G. "Standard Bag", "Large Bag", "Small Bag", "Strong Bag". The bags must then be stored consistently in your clothes. i.e. A "standard bag" must always be present in the front left-hand corner of your trousers. A "large bag" will always be present in the front right-hand corner etc... So clearly ...


1

I don’t eat meat but anything I need to freeze, I normally slice it up and keep it in reused glass jars and freeze it . It works perfectly and you end up reusing old glass jars. Although i believe that if you truly worried about sustainability the best think to do is stop contributing to meat and dairy industry .


1

You could either make your own or buy pre-made beeswax cloth. It behaves like plastic wrap and can be washed with cold water and soap. Here is a link on how to make your own.


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