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31

In India you have to look hard to find toilet paper and if you do it is expensive. They wash themselves after each time the use the toilet (longer). For this purpose, public toilets (train stations, hotels, restaurants) in India sometimes have a (fairly high-power) shower head installed next to them. If you use shower gel for your washing process, the result ...


29

I started using a toilet paper alternative about nine months ago. I was tired of the old plumbing in the house clogging up, and knowing that toilet paper is a cut down tree used so I can wipe my ass, felt very wasteful. At the same time, we're living in a modern society. I'm a software engineer by trade, so I prefer using technology when I can. I found ...


10

Yes, there are plenty of suppliers, at least in the UK, that use recycled materials to make their toilet paper. You could also look for accreditation for sustainable sourcing: there are schemes such as the Forest Stewarship Council that accredit suppliers that meet their criteria for sustainability. Note that some of these accreditation schemes are ...


9

I've lived in a house with a DIY composting toilet, and we've since purchased one that's Australian certified(called EcoFlo) to be the toilet in the house. It looks prettier, but it seems to work the same way as the DIY one (but it has the magic paperwork that makes the government happy). I've only done this in urban areas (minimum 200m² of garden space on a ...


8

I am about to start the project. Here are the charges I plan: 4h - build an extra composter, in order to have 3 composters like advised here, where A minimum three bin system is recommended. 12h - build a small cabin for privacy 4h - build two big containers. So when one is full, the other can be used In my view it should take about 1 hour / month to ...


8

Try planting mullein (verbascum thapsus). It is a pioneer species that will grow in the worst soil conditions and improve the soil over time. It's leaves are large, thick and covered in a soft fuzz which gives them the feel of a high quality 3-ply TP. It also has a number of medicinal uses outside of hygiene. (I would advise against reusing "soiled" leaves ...


8

To add to Terry and Darren's suggestions, I wanted to insist on the fact that modern bidet attachments are available and easily installable on a sitting water toilet without major modification. This one I found at a "culturally aware" place in Brisbane, Australia (sorry about the bad quality of the photo): This kind of compact electronic attachment might ...


6

The Romans of antiquity used a sponge on a stick. The sponge can be washed in a bucket with water and soap or eco friendly detergent.


6

I am surprised no-one has mentioned bidets yet, which in Japan is your high-tech toilet. (Though, it sounds like in India it is a shower!) The "eco sums" will get quite complicated, as you are trading some electricity and water to save a few sheets of paper. If you reduce from say 8 sheets of 1-ply down to 2 sheets, I imagine that is an overall saving: ...


5

We live in a household of 5, and have 2 composting toilets. Whatever solution you choose, the biggest hurdle we have found is the cost of heating the waste to increase the evaporation rate. As we live off grid, having heaters and fans running 24/7 does consume a fair amount of the power produced by our PV system. The waste pile must be aerated every couple ...


5

Females can certainly reduce their TP use by using cut up cloth to wipe after #1. Using the cut off tops of old cotton socks works really well too. They have a good amount of thickness for absorption. Small cotton cloths & sock tops take up hardly any space in a load of laundry and can be reused over and over. Reduce your use of precious tree fibres, and ...


5

The role of sawdust/shavings in composting toilets is four-fold: Visually hide your waste so the next person using the toilet doesn't need to see it Trap gases immediately above the waste so that they don't waft into the room Absorb some of the fluids/urine Add carbon to the high-nitrogen mix so that the composting process can begin The labelled 'quality' ...


4

I think the only difference of using leaves compared to toilet paper is that you'll be adding more nitrogen to the mix. This means that your C:N ratio will change, but you can solve this easily by adding more browns (carbon). Some examples of good browns are straw, cardboard or sawdust. You can check the table in this answer to see the C:N ratio of some ...


4

Options fall in 3 categories: A: Reduce the amount of water to evaporate. This can be done as easily as running pee to whatever route your greywater uses. Urine is moderately salty (various salts in addition to sodium chloride) and has urea in it from protein breakdown, but is not a health hazard. It does smell, but if mixed with greywater, and ...


4

The table on this Conservatree.org webpage explains that Processed Chlorine Free (PCF) means it's Totally Chlorine Free (TCF) plus it has recycled content. So all the PCF papers you found are also TCF. Conservatree.org also has listings for recycled and PCF paper products, including this relatively large list of toilet paper for consumer usage (US and ...


3

When my daughter was in diapers, we used cloth wipes for her. I bought them online, but pretty much any small piece of cloth will do. I would wet it with a spray bottle of water or a wipes solution to keep her skin clean and free of any rashes. The only thing I didn't like about it was having to using a diaper sprayer/bidet to rinse solid waste before ...


3

I live in Korea and we have a bidet toilet seat. I was wary at first, but now I'm a complete convert. Paper just cannot clean as well. There are a few varieties of bidet toilet attachments, but they basically fall into the categories of mechanical and electrical. The mechanical ones are of course the most environmentally friendly, and I personally don't like ...


2

If you have a sufficient yard area, a composting dry-toilet can be easily built as a very simple facility. create a composting pile - you will require at least 2, and better 3 composting piles in the long run. buy 2-3 big square flower-pots, and have a toilet seat fitted on top of it. The seat can easily be removed from the flower pot for disposal to the ...


2

Although I have not made my own composting toilet, I have been interested in the idea. I've heard that waste can be collected in a bucket (typically a 5-gallon) beneath the toilet hole. Peat moss makes a great compost material- just use it as an additive to the waste. I have heard you can also use sawdust or woodchips to eliminate odors.


2

As I understand the smell is the problem. The naphthelene masks the smell but it too is a problem. So the issue is "How to reduce the smell" One answer is to cover it up. Anotehr answer is to dilute it. When I worked in a school we had a fly problem at some times of the year. We got a sprayer on a timer. It would put a 1 second mist of fly spray every ...


2

In remote and undeveloped locations, composting toilets are considered the first step toward civilization. On the other end of the spectrum, namely cities and large towns, a sewage system is the only option. The middle range is where septic systems become required by code. When developing human habitats outside of sewer system range, I've had to consider ...


2

A. The composting toilet will use essentially no water. While the water in a septic system is recycled into ground water, this doesn't help. Water is plentiful, and not in short supply. Clean water suitable for drinking is not. A comment mentioned using rain water. A conventional residential toilet is used about 5 times a day. If low flow, call it 4 ...


2

Check this out: http://www.strawbalecentral.com/cinva/sunnyjohn.html This is a 'mouldering toilet' It composts, but slowly. Downsides: Bulky: You need room to move a drum in and out under the seat. Needs to be kept warm to work. (True of most non sewage toilets) Upsides: Simple, stink free.


2

Assuming you can get the appropriate variance or exception from municipal and state health and building codes to put drain water into the toilet feed at all (which is unlikely in the United States), the low cost solution uses a combination of height (which fluid systems use all the time to create pressure differentials) and a second tank. There are a few ...


1

One method of making a composting toilet is to connect the outlet of a regular flush toilet to a ~1 cubic meter flowbin (just a container with an inlet at the top and outlet at the lowest point). And then you fill it a third to half way with mulching material (woodchips work well) and a kilogram of earthworms. What will happen is the solids will get trapped ...


1

Composting toilets seem like the obvious solution. In warmer climates it's easy to have a hot compost that cycles fairly quickly, in colder climates you will likely need to heat it or accept a very slow cold cycle (which is risky because not all pathogens will be killed in a cold cycle). The key is to mix in cellulose to help aerate the mix and even out the ...


1

Composting Toilets and Capacitation We are doing work in the Colombian Andes, and this is our current go-to solution. The idea is to elevate the toilet, create a seal for insects, keep waste dry with sawdust, ash, lime, rice husk, or other dry product. When the bin fills, remove it, seal it and date it with proper saftey equipment. We use long gloves ...


1

In more outhouse oriented times, folk would use old corn cobs. Giving us the expression 'corn-hole'


1

After much experimentation and financial, environmental and hygienic considerations, I have found that, for my use, Skoy cloths make the best alternative to toilet paper. They are the right size, absorbent, easily and thoroughly washable, wring out almost dry, dry quickly and last a long time. I feel clean and pleased to help the planet. Of course, I do ...


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