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11

Yes, limonene is a terpene and terpenes react with ozone to form formaldehyde and other micro-particle pollutants. Limonene itself isn’t toxic and hasn’t been found to be harmful, but some people are sensitive to it’s various oxidation products causing skin irriation or respiratory problems. Research has shown that: when people use the [terpene-based ...


8

First of all, in many products BPA has not been replaced at all. It is still present in many types of food packaging, especially in canned foods. AFAIK the main exception is baby bottles which are required to be BPA free in the US, Canada and the EU. France is also an exception as it is the only EU-country where BPA is banned for all food packaging. Second,...


8

PCB remediation is not something you can (or should) handle yourself. First thing is I would get the soil tested. If it comes back contaminated, you might consider whether it is still safe to live there, as PCBs are pretty toxic. Poking around the EPA's pages on PCBs, it appears that there is a real issue of cleanup and disposal, as in, one has to be ...


6

I know that in the past PBDEs were used as flame retardant in all kinds of products like clothing, computer monitor casings, couches, but also in foam mattrasses, including memory foam. I suspect manufacturers stopped using them after it became known that PBDEs accumulate in human bodies and may cause cancer. Also, PBDEs have been banned in the EU in 2004 ...


5

Unless polyethylene has been pretreated during its manufacturing process it is a very obdurate material, being susceptible to degradation by oxidation and UV light. Degradation can occur with chlorine, particularly of polyethylene water pipe that convey chlorinated water. Concerning minute fragments of polyethylene results from degradation, these like the ...


5

Short answer: Since the flammability requirements in the state of California are changing, you probably can shop for a new couch which does not have flame-retardant chemicals come next summer. Although the label TB-117-2013 on the product menas that it meets the new requirements, but it does not guarantee that the product is free of flame-retardant chemicals....


5

Their website states that: it is rated as "excellent" on the WWF Check Your Paper platform (see here) it is FSC® Recycled certified it is Chlorine-free bleached their producing mills are ISO 14001 (environmental management) certified it is CO2 neutral optional (it looks like some of their paper supports a hydro electricity project in Indonesia) It is hard ...


4

Many 'tree farmers' spray trees to increase the shelf-life. We know bugs and fungi will attack organic matter such as the Christmas trees once there is the opportunity to. There are pesticides and herbicides used throughout the life of the tree and these are all known to have residual effects that can last many years. Surveys carried out by Dr. Steve Toth, ...


4

The danger is real enough for so-called "ground contact" applications, such as in your garden case. Over time, the constant exposure to moisture leaches out the chemicals from the lumber and into the soil or ground water (especially in soils high in clay). Much before 2000, many pressure treating processes within the US involved some form of arsenic. ...


3

What you're seeing: biopiles it looks like companies just dig the ground, leave everything in a pile for a while (few weeks?) and then bring over the dirt elsewhere. It sounds like what you're seeing are biopiles (also known as heap pile bioremediation, bioheaps, biomounds, or static-pile composting). From the Remediation Technologies Screening Matrix ...


2

As I understand the smell is the problem. The naphthelene masks the smell but it too is a problem. So the issue is "How to reduce the smell" One answer is to cover it up. Anotehr answer is to dilute it. When I worked in a school we had a fly problem at some times of the year. We got a sprayer on a timer. It would put a 1 second mist of fly spray every ...


2

The German Wikipedia page on PVC contains some of the information you seek. I'll paraphrase: Soft-PVC emits hazardous substances (BPA). I recall but don't know from where that PVC is no longer allowed in Germany for drinking water. Most PVC is used in buildings (pipes, window-parts...) and separated gathering is easier than with other plastics. PVC can be ...


2

I found more information about these 'rumours'. An expert on forests working for the German WWF has told the German 'Taz' newspaper that many Christmas trees grown in Germany are full of pesticides. The German growers claim the use of pesticides is necessary due to the widespread use of monocultures (to keep the prices low). In monocultures diseases and ...


2

If you have a particular location in the room where you suspect they may have been used, you could try releasing some live bugs there (ones that are moderately welcome indoors), eg some jumpy spiders. If they quickly die, that would indicate insecticide use. Obviously you would ensure any bugs released are in good health to start with, and release several ...


2

I found a (eventually political) study made by NABU Hamburg from 2013 about copper slag. They state, that several materials are included with toxic and hazardous to health impact, among others (per 1000 t of slag): lead (1t), manganese (1t), arsenic (0.37t), nickel (0.2 t), cobalt (0.3t) and some others, like antimony, cadmium, tin and chromatics. Most of ...


1

You've raised a few issues in your posts, so having just built a new house I'll address those I'm able to: To start with, I live in a country/area where corrugated steel roofing is the absolute norm and has been for over half a century. In my town less than 1% of roofs are clad in anything else. Everyone collects rainwater. Everyone uses that rainwater. ...


1

As it turns there are several solutions. And as I've discovered, the headline is: aluminum is probably fine. HOWEVER ... in my case I think it will be cost-prohibitive, since a 4x8 sheet costs ~$100. I found the documents that @Dispenser referred to, and luckily, they were commissioned by the Texas Water Development Board. TWDB Document 1 TWDB Document 2 ...


1

http://globalsilicones.org ----- /sustainability/ and /silicones-chemistry/ 'Alot has to do with type of silicone. All silicones are sensitive to uv light and will break down eventually. Some will leach oil over time and some will become brittle. My suggestion is to find out the type of silicone and the manufacturer and check the specs. I have silicone ...


1

This brochure from greensciencepolicy.org provides the following guidance: Foam-Free Furniture: Polyester-, down-, or wool filled furniture is unlikely to contain added flame retardants. Furniture without filling (e.g. wood, wicker) is also a good option. Flame-Retardant-Free Furniture: More flame retardantfree options should become available to consumers ...


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