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33

That the scheme actually has a net positive effect, both in the short and long-term How effective a tree planting scheme is in capturing and storing carbon dioxide, is for a large part determined by what happens to the trees after they are planted. When trees mature and are harvested for wood that's used in construction, then the captured carbon dioxide is ...


31

There are different levels of service. In itself planting a tree is very easy and cheap, of the 3 billion trees in the UK, most drop thousands of seeds each year and some germinate all by themselves for free. On the other hand, planting seedlings can be done mechanically using a Damcon PL10 with four row attachment, you can plant 20,000 in a day, costing ...


26

Questions about tree planting have come up on StackExchange quite often, and in the news various countries have great drives to plant vast numbers of trees in a single day. A common issue seems to be a misunderstanding of the relationship between planting 'a tree' and 'offsetting carbon'. Whilst its true that a single mature twenty year old tree will both ...


11

To qualify my answer I have ended up here following research into the new agreement made today in Paris regarding climate change (COP21). There appears to be a consensus that one of the most important ways of mitigating greenhouse gas emissions is to plant trees and then burn them in carbon capture facilities, generating energy but trapping carbon. (I have ...


7

Any time you want to give money to a charity, you should do some basic research on how the charity spends donated money. Some charities spend over 90% of donated funds on charitable works, with minimal overhead, others spend a lot of money on salaries and perks for executives, and some spend a lot of money on lobbying politicians or educating the public to ...


7

Pollution Trees (and plants for that matter) can reduce air pollution by trapping small particles (fine dust) on their leaves and by absorbing gases such as nitrogen dioxide, ozone and sulfur dioxide. However, depending on the location and type of tree it is also possible that trees prevent pollution like exhaust fumes from cars from flowing away quickly. ...


5

Perhaps the best answer to the question, as posed, is... Research the source of the tree. Was it farmed under the guidelines or certification of the American Tree Farm System or in Britain the British Christmas Tree Growers Association (BCTGA) or the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC)? There definitely are eco-friendly tree growers using low-grade land that ...


4

Each offset program is problematic in its own way. We can't (feasibly) put carbon back; we can only try to store away what's already out there, or give more people more options to develop without hydrocarbons. Consider giving to organizations that protect forests and other natural areas to preserve existing trees through policy action or by buying land, ...


3

One concern is that it takes too long. Because a sustainable forest needs decades to grow it is a midterm solution only. Another concern that comes to mind which I have not yet heard is that the forests compete with farming over land use: Both need reasonably fertile land. This conflict resembles the one created by plants grown for fuel: Rich countries ...


3

If you restore the ecology of barren earth so that it continues to sustain and increase total biomass, then you've made a big step in that direction. As soil improves, the total carbon contained or sequestered in it will rise. When a tree dies, or when it is thinned, trimmed, or pruned, the wood can be converted to biochar and most of the carbon removed from ...


2

If you don't buy a Christmas tree your impact on the environment is 0. If you do buy a tree, there will be some impact because most likely water, fertilizer and pesticides were used to grow the tree, the tree has to be dug out or cut down, and it has to be transported. Where I live some people like to gather and burn Christmas trees on new year's eve which ...


2

Mσᶎ is correct; you cannot include the embedded carbon of the tree itself because of it's short time in captured state. unless you take the tree's back from customers and then dispose of them in a very specific way. We will assume you cannot or would not do that; therefore all the factors are negative and contribute towards a carbon footprint. This includes ...


1

I can't think of any leguminous trees which produce edible fruit. Olives are the obvious trees for a dry Mediterranean climate. Then the citrines and Almonds Wallnuts and sweet chestnuts. But if you are emphasizing dryness what about coming down to ground level with pineapples?


1

My simple answer is yes, especially if you have two planted in it's place. That's assuming you mean to buy a Christmas tree that's been cut down. (Unless you plan on removing the tree from the earth's ecosystem, or it is the 'last' tree, than it's all a part of the circle of life.)


1

Trees follow the logistics curve for growth. More complicated, the number of trees descreases as they get larger. E.g. after a forest fire, lodgepole pine sprout at about 10 per square foot. In 10 years there is about 1 per square yard. At 30 years it's one per 6 foot square. The fastest mass growth rate is when a given area is mostly at the 1" diameter ...


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