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Yes, being a vegetarian is more environmentally-friendly than otherwise This question has been asked and answered on Skeptics Stack Exchange, based on a claim by PETA to that point. Full details are in this answer. To summarise the summary: Production of meat is a major source of anthropogenic greenhouse gases. A vegetarian diet therefore leads to less ...


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Several news outlets and popular science publications have reported on this subject in the last few years. Often, the focus is not specifically on vitamins, but on nutrients in general (i.e. "phytonutrients"). One study often cited is Donald R. Davis' publication from 2004 that showed that 6 out of 13 nutrients had declined (statistically significant) in ...


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Your question seems to be specifically limited to grain fed to livestock, even though a great deal of the feed grown for livestock is not grain, and most livestock are not fed, let alone fed grain. It's likely based on stories like this one saying "U.S. could feed 800 million people with grain that livestock eat, Cornell ecologist advises animal scientists". ...


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What to do with waste products, if not feed them to animals? Organic (of or relating to an organism) waste products all compost and if you want everyone in the world to live on grains and vegetables then you want all the compost you can get. In fact, you want to start using some of the waste products that the west mostly does waste already (nightsoil). ...


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Both of Tim's points (re: negative population growth and elastic demand) are important points, but I don't think they're doing a good job of answering your question. Unlike people living in the 1980s, a lot of people today expect marginal changes in their carbon footprint to have marginal global effects within their own lifetimes. Therefore, a plan of not ...


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Mass producers of the grain consumed in feedlots proudly assert that they are feeding the world, as if they want a medal for their efforts. This is an obvious consequence of cognitive dissonance. They have doubts about their own activities, but if you ask them what they fear about the future based on what they know, you will see "environmental impacts" in a ...


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Someone has to suggest the obvious answer... for the record. Q: "is there an entirely different solution?" A: Don't have children. Earth's problem isn't solely and exclusively with what its Human inhabitants are doing... how many are doing it is the main problem. No matter how carnivorous and voracious a single Human is (or could be), their consumption ...


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The answer by Jean-Paul Calderone correctly specified how much population the food can support. I'm not focusing on that at all in my answer; I'm only focusing on energy. This answer, however, did not take into account energy aspects, only mentioning than an unlimited supply of natural gas is needed. That is most certainly false: methane can be created with ...


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I suspect the public transport question doesn't give significant carbon variations, so I'd replace it with a different question. The research question itself will affect what you might ask. In the comments, you mention you're interested in the links between beliefs and behaviours with regard to carbon. There is some good existing work on beliefs and ...


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