43

Good ventilation needs a strategy of its own accord. It doesn't just happen. It will depend on what climate zone you're in, and what your building is, but from your question, I'm going to assume that winter means you're having to use some space-heating to get the home to a decent temperature. The very best ventilation strategy we have, is to make sure that ...


35

Open all windows wide but only for a short period. It will replace the air, but won't cool down the walls. This is the usual recommendation of gas companies.


20

Take a look at a passive solar heat collector. They work on the principle of thermosiphoning. The design in the link and the picture below has an additional top vent exposed to the outside so you can close the top interior vent and draw air out of the building during the summer. I've seen more advanced designs that include doors that automatically close at ...


14

You don't state how much change you are willing to consider. A device called a Heat Recovery Ventilator (HRV) passes the outgoing air and the incoming air through a heat exchanger and transfers the heat from one to the other. It usually would be connected to your central air ducts to distribute the incoming air, and would require pass-throughs for the ...


9

If you have the property, and resources, make sure your house is tight. Then, dig a four foot trench that zigzags across a suitable part of your yard, taking care to call Mis Dig for location of underwater electrical, water, and gas lines. Lay PVC pipe into the trench, making sure it's water tight. Bring one end up from the ground, above the maximum snow ...


6

A few cubic metres of air are heated up and cooled down quickly. This is why fan heaters are usually a bad idea. They heat the air and before the air had a chance of heating something more substantial, it creeps out through some crevice you didn't know existed. I lived in a flat with a tiled woodstove for a while and it was fantastic. The stove gives off ...


6

You should turn off your heating at least half an hour before opening the window, and do not switch it on immediately after closing it. Open the window when temperature of air gets significantly lower and open it when it'll go back higher. Open all the windows, and for the short period of time. Warm air gets immediately sucked out and you'll feel when it ...


4

Positive input ventilation* (PIV) is a lot cheaper to install then a heat recovery system; it pushes some of the air from the loft into the house. The air in the loft tends to be warmer then the outside air. As a dryer house feels warmer, by improving the ventilation you may be able to reduce the temperature you heat to, therefore often a PIV system will ...


3

Not all "range fans" blow the air out of the house. We discovered after decades that ours does not. It has filters and the air just comes out of the sides and right back into the kitchen. You might think that can't handle your situation, but we roast coffee under it and it works fine.


2

I would answer this as a comment, but comments don't accept multiple paragraphs. On the face of it this is a bad idea. Better to pull air OUT of the house, and let it sneak in where it can. Scenario 1. The building vapour barrier is perfect. Air put into the house can only escape through faulty weatherstripping at doors and windows. Net result. Too ...


2

Simple Answer There is a simple answer that does not require significant modification to an existing residential or commercial building. This is the standard high efficiency HVAC answer to the question: Heat air as it enters. Scientific Validity This is based on thermodynamics. The efficiency of a heater is based on the temperature difference between ...


2

One expert colleague of mine had heard of this in the past. Once. So it's not unknown. Another thought that it might not be that uncommon, but that it wouldn't be wise to buy one that hadn't passed a high, independent, certification standard Amongst the experts I talked to, there was scepticism about the paper core; the heat recovery rate (75%) ascribed to ...


1

My high efficiency water heater has an electric damper. Conventional butterfly plate. The unit had a separate data sheet, so it wasn't part of the furnace itself. Try HVAC stores. Explain the problem. You may be able to find an off the wall solution. Failing that, you may be able just run an electric damper in parallel with the fan. There would be ...


1

There is a HRV without ducts, which can be installed relatively easy in houses without HRV. The first OEM name is "inventer", but there are cheaper alternatives. It works like this: There are two ducts in the outer walls of the house at markedly different places in the house. The short ducts contain a fan and a heat storage unit. The fans realize a cross ...


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