9

An extra box below a main box with holes can be used for 2 purposes: Capturing fluids. The holes make sure that a surplus of fluids can escape and your box doesn't get too wet. Holes used for draining only are usually small. Harvesting compost. When using a continuous flow approach (a.k.a. flow-through approach), you regularly remove compost that is ready ...


9

Generally this comes from having an excess of "greens" rather than "browns" in the bin, and potentially too much moisture also. When this has happened to me I generally put a generous amount of shredded newspaper / junk mail in, and try to let it dry out as much as possible - the fruit flies will then tend to up and leave. It's probably also worth noting ...


9

I can't offer anything by way of vermicomposting advice, but an opinion to consider. You are likely to get greater participation by putting "one bin per story, alongside the usual trash bins, each serving 4 apartments (10-15 people)." The more convenient you make participating, the more people will do so. This option requires minimal change in routine on ...


8

In Australia Wheely Bin Worm Farms are fairly common. They're usually built into a 140 litre wheely bin. We had one with 6 students living in a house but at times struggled to keep it fed because we also had chickens and a composting system. We used to raid the local fruit and vege shop's rubbish bins for extra stuff to feed them, and also used that green ...


8

Either way (dumping on top or burying) is fine, but both methods may have some influence on the processing speed of the food. Worms don't eat fresh material. First microorganisms need to soften the food and start decomposing it, only then will the worms eat it. Most people don't care much about how fast food is processed and simply dump it on top of the bin....


7

I think you have ample soil, and that soil is still filling up with castings. But if it's been a couple of weeks and you're not seeing anything, your worms are probably too dry. In Australia it's often necessary to water your worm farm as the heat dries them out too much. It's like a pot plant - you have a small amount of soil that doesn't have the thermal ...


6

Avoid sulfer rich foods in addition to the normal vermicomposting no-nos. The best way to prevent odor is to ensure adequate air circulation and proper hydration. Most odor comes as a consequence of too much moisture. As for the fruit flies, you can try placing cups of vinegar in the bin, but this will probably only reduce the quantity of flies rather ...


6

The general rule of thumb that I have heard is no. I can't seem to find a good resource at this time that breaks it out conclusively, but the logic that I have heard goes as follows. Composting happens at different speeds and different heat levels. Your typical worm bin tends to operate at a low temperature (otherwise the worms would bake!). This would be ...


6

If the worms are growing (dig down and check on this every now and then), eating (new food should disappear from the surface in just a few days), pooping (leaving casings on the top of the worm bin soil) and reproducing (really healthy bins get so full of worms that some of them need to be "re-homed" on a regular basis), then they are doing well. If food ...


5

A general rule is if you dig around carefully in your bin and you see worms of all sizes, ranging from tiny baby worms to large adult worms, as well as worm cocoons (small white-brown eggs that look like seeds), then the worms are procreating fine and should be ok and healthy. Just don't check this too often, because worms don't like to be disturbed. Other ...


5

If you run your worm farm properly then it doesn't smell. It will give of a earthy scent. However if things go wrong because your worm farm contains too much water or nitrogen then it will start to smell sour or rotten. So make sure you have proper drainage and keep an eye on the C:N ratio of whatever you put in the farm. If you are using your worms to ...


5

With an indoor worm bin, we're very strict about just putting vegetable and fruit matter into the bin. Much of it comes from our juicing. This kind of matter doesn't put off much of a smell as long as we don't over feed the worms. We learned how much our worms could eat by trial and error. It'll be obvious if they're getting too much food because they'll ...


5

Many sites on the internet mention that the liquid from vermicompost is the ideal fluid for (fertilizing) your garden. However, I haven't seen any scientific evidence on this anywhere so I suspect it doesn't exists. I did a quick google and found this document where on page 19 it says The evidence for the nutritional value of vermiliquid products is ...


5

If your bin has a lid and the container is nice and dark the worms will come to the surface for the food. The worms have no problem coming out of the medium for a variety of reasons but they run from the light. Keep it dark and placing food on the surface shouldn't be a problem. That being said I think it depends on how you've processed the scraps. If it'...


5

I've always just put scraps on top. It works perfectly fine and the worms eat it without drama, but I do notice a few slaters, cockroaches and spiders gathering in the worm farm and I'm wondering whether digging the scraps in would discourage these critters from taking up residence in the worm farm. An update on this; our worm farm had soooo many red-backs,...


4

Be sure to put easy to read instructions above each bin, detailing what to put in the bins and how to do it. Otherwise, there is no telling what people will be putting in there and you could end up with a putrid mess instead of compost.


4

Quick answer: It depends on the circumstances in your bin and your abilities to keep those circumstances ideal for a particular type of worm. Assuming this is no problem, my best bet would be that a mix of Eisenia Fetida and Eisenia Hortensis has the highest throughput rate. Long answer: Most research on vermicomposting focuses on reproduction and grow ...


4

The variously sized worms lower in your bin are a good sign. Apparently they are still procreating, so there doesn't seem to be an immediate danger of extinction. You mentioned that the bottom of your bin feels like a damp sponge. That is more or less the moisture level you should be aiming for; a damp, wrung-out sponge. Some types of worms, like the ...


4

First of all, shredded cardboard is rather dry so you have to make sure that you are not starting with too little moisture. Also cardboard doesn't have much bacteria to start decomposition and preprocess the material for the worms (worms only eat material that's already decomposing), so I'd add a little bit of dirt and a few greens at the start as well. ...


4

I'm not sure if the bones still contain meat, so I'll answer for both. Meat It's certainly possible to add meat to your worm farm, but many people warn against this because of the risk of attracting vermin and the possible bad smell of decaying meat. To reduce these risks it's best to use a closed worm bin so critters can't enter, add only a few small ...


4

I have one, and I would have to say it's possible but not certain that it will smell. With care you could avoid it as demonstrated by people using them indoors. You would have to be more careful than me about the amount of water that gets in, and possibly about the mix of food hot give them. Mine has a sump to collect liquid plant food, and a tap to remove ...


3

Quail Though I haven't kept them myself, I remember reading that quail tend to be much quieter than chickens (especially when compared with roosters!), require a smaller area to live and are well suited for suburban backyards. They and their eggs can be eaten and are generally considered a delicacy. Here's a basic introduction about them: http://www....


3

There is no need to add or change soil in a stackable worm farm. If a tray is full you just start placing food in an empty tray above. The material in the new tray will decompose and turn into soil eventually. After a while, when the top tray starts to fill, the worms will move there provided the conditions in the bin are right and the worms have good access ...


3

The combination of 4 things worked for me: stop over-feeding and let the compost dry if too wet vacuum the flies daily cover all the food scraps and put a layer of dry newspaper shred on top of the compost have a trap near the compost to catch some of the flies (yellow container with water + dish soap + sugar works for me, as yellow color and sugar attract ...


3

I will make this brief: Search for fruit fly lifespan. An associated article shows an experiment of the effects of sweeteners on fruit flies done by a 6th grader. He found that Truvia killed fruit flies. So I tried Truvia in my worm bin and it works! AND the worms are not harmed. You should try it and if it works for you, spread the word: No more fruit ...


3

You can make a trap to catch the existing fruit flies with an empty jar, a small plastic sandwich or zip close baggie with square corners, a rubber band and some wine or beer. Pour a small amount of beer in the bottom of the jar. Snip off a tiny bit of the corner of the bag, making a small hole. Push the corner of the bag a few inches down into jar, making ...


3

Summarising from the instructions that came with mine (a similar shape) you should add material in layers, first filling the bottom layer and only then moving on to the top. It's quite easy to add too much, especially at first, and it may be getting too wet. If used mainly for kitchen scraps it may also end up with too much nitrogen-rich material. Adding ...


2

You don't have to worry too much about molds or fungi in a worm bin. Molds are useful and help decomposing the bin contents. However, you do have to regulate the moisture level of your worm bin! If a worm bin is too wet it will start to smell and the worms won't like a lot of water. If a bin becomes excessively wet your worms may even die and/or drown. Most ...


2

You could use some food grade DE on your compost pile this will help dry it out and will most certainly kill all the fruit flies.


2

Sounds like the video was pretty good. This sounds like a stackable system. They seem to be the least labor intensive. Eventually you would want the worms to move from the lowest level because you should harvest the worm castings. You may still have some stragglers in the lower level of castings so if you're making tea or anything other than top ...


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