Podcast #128: We chat with Kent C Dodds about why he loves React and discuss what life was like in the dark days before Git. Listen now.

Hot answers tagged

18

You are asking to choose between two bad systems, and the least bad choice will depend on the surplus capacity of the sewage system vs space in the landfill. Vancouver B.C. has now passed a building code against garburators. Reason: It doubled the amount of solid waste in the sewer system. The additional solids also made for more problems with blockages. ...


17

TLDR; don't use them for lighting. Given that you could keep your incandescent bulbs for when your current energy-efficient (I will assume CCFL) bulbs need replacing, your choice boils down to: buy a new CCFL; or use an incandescent that has already been manufactured. This helpful analysis gives the embodied energy in a CCFL as 1.7 kWh. Let's assume that ...


16

Do you know the rationale behind washing the containers? There's a large-scale system for, among others, plastic containers in place in Germany, and here you are explicitly advised not to wash the containers. My gut reply would be to not wash the containers. This is based on the assumption that they will either be recycled, and no recycling plant can rely ...


16

Well, composting would give you a way to use waste products and have them turned into something useful. A sustainable system is closed in the sense that you need to buy as few resources as possible and produce as little waste as possible. Your system just keeps turning, like a perpetual motion machine, with you feeding off the system. Composting your waste ...


16

Apples, like practically all other organic waste, are ideal for composting. You can cover the apples with leaves, sawdust, other soil, etc., to prevent them being eaten by birds & insects and carried away from your compost pile. But in principle you need nothing but a little patience and soon your apples, whether windfallen, stormfallen or hand-picked, ...


15

First, in case you aren't already aware, Catalog Choice offers something they call MailStop Shield. Here's how they describe it: MailStop Shield opts you out of the marketing lists that data brokers share with companies you have not done business with, which reduces unwanted advertising mail. We resubmit your data broker opt-outs on a regular basis ...


15

Not an exact answer to what you're asking, but: Re-use them! Re-using is almost always better than recycling, since recycling isn't 'free' (it still takes energy). They take up little space, you can save them for years, you don't have to go to the post-office when you do need them, and it saves you some money!


13

Composting (to enrich soil and provide fertilizer) and for use as mulching material (to reduce water use and keep weeds down) are actually great ways to reuse these materials — especially if you use them to replace less-sustainable alternatives (e.g. water soluble chemical fertilizers and commercially-farmed mulches).


13

No. First, if you throw things in the river, especially waste, you'll likely be cited for dumping and/or littering. Second, there are definite environmental concerns to doing so. Dog waste is quite unhealthy; there are definitely bad bacteria and potentially bad parasites in there. Dogs don't poop in rivers naturally; do not put it in there. Also, ...


12

Things you could do with organic waste, other than composting: For food and garden weeds/waste, most of this makes decent chicken food. If I dump a wheelbarrow of weeds from the garden into the chicken run, the girls go nuts -- similarly with a bucket of kitchen waste. They'll skip the stuff they don't like (e.g. banana peels), and you can rake this up when ...


12

If you twisted my arm to choose between those two options, I would say the garbage disposal is more sustainable. Sewage goes through physical and biological process to remove contaminants and the treated water is returned to the ecosystem. Even though not all the sludge byproducts are reusable — some are only suitable for disposal — it's pretty ...


12

Unfortunately, knowing what is normal waste generation per capita isn't going to help you much when it comes to being sustainable. To put it simply, the current reality is that it's normal to be unsustainable. That needs to change. There are two things most people can do to heavily reduce waste without too much effort, depending on their situation: ...


11

I've heard conflicting reports on feeding eggshells to reptiles. Most people seem to think it's ok. The concern seems to be about heavy metals and hormones in the shells--though if you're buying organic I don't think that would be as much of a problem--and salmonella contamination. Tortoise Trust says not to do it because of the salmonella risk and because ...


11

I know about two different studies that investigated which funeral method has the smallest environmental impact. I will base my answer on the most recent study and then shortly discuss the differences with the other one. Two studies In this report drawn up by the Dutch research institution TNO in 2011 two alternatives are mentioned that are have a lower ...


11

I use them in garden/indoor. Something like this... (source : google search)


11

I live off-grid, so I did a lot of study on this topic. All used coffee grounds make good fertilizer. Drip machines seem to use a lot of energy, and they seem to use it for a lot of time. They also use disposable filters. Drip machines are kind of on the off-grid "blacklist". Percolators waste a lot of energy because they have to keep the water boiling ...


10

I have seen broken glass (± 1" (~25 mm) square pieces) used effectively as the drainage backfill around a residential foundation. The owner reported that it worked very well. An internet search shows other situations where the crushed glass is used as aggregate in construction, including some cases where the aesthetics are used to an advantage. See ...


10

If you're willing to put some effort in, then check out http://www.e-stewards.org/ to look for a third-party certified e-waste recycler. Otherwise, Best Buy accepts many electronics and accessories for recycling, free of charge. http://www.bestbuy.com/site/Global-Promotions/Recycling-Electronics/pcmcat149900050025.c?id=pcmcat149900050025 There are ...


10

Technical terms To partially understand the process of draining batteries it is important to know some technical parameters: voltage - Battery operated electric devices need certain minimal voltage level and current to work correctly. As a battery is being drained the voltage drops down. In some batteries the voltage goes down very slowly during most of ...


10

Some countries have introduced a tax on plastic shopping bags. For example, in Ireland the tax is 0.15 EURO (about 12p in English money or $0.20 in American money). Within a short space of time, shops offered customers a choice between: (1) free paper bags, or (2) heavy-duty reusable bags (usually made of cloth, but sometimes made from thick plastic) for 1 ...


10

The opther answers are all basically ok, but I want to add some details. The first issue is nutrients: By adding your leftovers to the river, you practically add fertilizer that can lead to algae blooms and, ultimately, eutrophication. Of course, fish also poop in the river, but they also eat from the river, so they don't add much nutrients. Soil ecosystems ...


10

Yes, using a menstrual cup (such as DivaCup) is much better for the environment. I located a thesis paper written by a student at Dalhousie University for her BSc in Environmental Science and Gender and Women Studies which compares the financial and environmental costs of various menstrual products. Here's the relevant part of the abstract: The ...


10

It may depend on your local rules, but here it's certainly better to put a recyclable thing in the bin than a non-recyclable thing in the recycling. That is, if your council doesn't have any sorting facilities: if they deem the recycling to be 'contaminated', they'll send the whole load to the incinerator - whereas if you put it in the normal rubbish, it's ...


9

In The Netherlands, we can put a sticker on our mailbox. One states No/No, which means you don't want to receive unsollicited mail and also not the non-subscription local newspaper. The other states No/Yes, indicating you do wish to receive the latter. There is agreement with the marketing companies and the people who deliver the mail to respect this wish. ...


9

Some experience with this. You won't get a yes/no answer. In general many omnivorous fish (carp, catfish) will eat lots of things but they may not be able to chew or bite with much force. This limits what they can eat. Additionally some can be somewhat picky eaters. Here are some suggestions I have found helpful: Unless it is really easy to chew (think ...


9

Many in the sanitation treatment industry feel the garbage disposal was among the most troublesome inventions in the history of the modern home. Treatment facilities are designed to remove bacterial and viral contaminants, not solid wastes (grinding it and sending it into the sewer system does not change the fact that it is solid waste). Most plants have ...


9

Try Bokashi composting: Done in the kitchen in an air-tight container--this is an anaerobic composting method or fermentation, not aerobic like conventional composting--surprisingly little odor is produced because nothing rots as happens in conventional composting. Can take a greater variety of wastes than conventional composting (including meat, bone, ...


9

I disagree with the answers that say not to use it. It may in fact be an excellent idea to use it if: you live somewhere that requires your home to be heated in the winter you currently heat with electricity or with something less efficient than electricity The "wasted" energy from an incandescent bulb is wasted as heat. In the summer, this is really bad ...


9

Ironically, the better you are at reducing your waste, the less likely you are to succeed at replacing plastic bags for the irreducible portion. My mother throws out actual garbage twice a year - one small plastic bag such as the ones you get from grocery stores, every 6 months. While she always has a reusable shopping bag in her purse, she finds that ...


9

​​Yes, blister packs are recyclable (for example with machines like this one) but chances are there's no recycling company in your area that will accept and recycle it unless you are able to separate the different materials yourself. Blister packs like the one you posted typically consist of plastic (usually PET or PVC) and aluminium. The problem with ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible