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The best solution is for these windfall apples to never exist in the first place. Most apple varieties fall into a biennial bearing pattern. They produce a very heavy fruit set in year N. The burden of bringing this large quantity of fruit to maturity suppresses fruit bud growth (which happens in the fall). In year N+1 there are negligible fruit buds and ...


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This may sound strange but what I have tried this year was to collect a load of dry grass from the outside of my house and place a layer of about 3-4 inches around my apple tree. When the hundreds of windfall apples fall and eventually full grown apples fall, it’s going to create a natural compost. As of now the dry grass is slowly decomposing underneath and ...


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